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Tonight on AC360: Toddler sings anti-gay song at church
A viral video of a young boy singing an anti-gay message at Apostolic Truth Tabernacle in Indiana has drawn protests.
June 4th, 2012
06:01 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Toddler sings anti-gay song at church

About 20 protesters gathered on Sunday outside the Apostolic Truth Tabernacle here to voice opposition to a viral online video that was taped in the church and shows a young child singing a song with lyrics that offer a harsh message for homosexuals.

The video, which surfaced on YouTube last week, shows a child in front of the congregation, singing "I know that God is right, and somebody's wrong... ain't no homo going to make it to heaven."

The congregation erupts in applause at those lines, which the unidentified boy repeats as the pastor looks on.

At another point in the video a voice is heard shouting,"That’s my boy."

In the first Sunday service since the video surfaced, congregants arrived to the church as protesters jeered them over the video.

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Filed under: Religion
May 22nd, 2012
10:45 PM ET

Church member to CNN: 'Lay off my pastor'

Just about everyone here is talking about the local pastor who made national headlines this week after a video that features him telling congregants how to "get rid of" gays went viral.

Neighbors of the Providence Road Baptist Church - where a sign advertises "old time religion" - say Pastor Charles Worley is known for being over the top, with one neighbor describing him as "fire and brimstone" whose views are out of sync with much of the surrounding community.

"I figured a way out, a way to get rid of all the lesbians and queers, but I couldn't get it past the Congress," Worley told his church on May 13, in a video that has been seen half a million times on YouTube.

"Build a great big, large fence - 50 or 100 miles long - and put all the lesbians in there," Worley said. "Fly over and drop some food. Do the same thing with the queers and the homosexuals, and have that fence electrified so they can't get out. Feed them. And you know in a few years, they'll die out. You know why? They can't reproduce."

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Filed under: Religion
Tonight on AC360: FLDS police corruption
May 9th, 2012
03:04 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: FLDS police corruption

As you drive into Colorado City, Arizona you can't help but feel blown away by the picturesque scenery. The mountain range is so beautiful; it's a shame that very few people have seen the area that is only a few hours from Las Vegas. It's no secret that visitors aren't welcome here.

Gary Tuchman and I have been coming to the FLDS town for several years to report on their leader and convicted child rapist Warren Jeffs. We’ve done stories on the way he runs the polygamous sect in the area also known as Short Creek. Journalists who have worked out there know there are challenges to covering stories in the area. The minute anyone from the media arrives, text messages are sent around the community alerting everyone not to talk with them.

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Filed under: FLDS
April 24th, 2012
09:05 PM ET

Prostitution easily found in Cartagena

The old city in Cartagena, Colombia is an amazing sight. The “walled city” probably doesn’t look too different now compared to when the Dutch, French and English attacked the city in search of its wealth of gold and silver. It truly is breathtaking. But once you get passed the archways and enter the old city, you notice prostitution is thriving here.

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Filed under: Secret Service
Tonight on AC360: A Texas family's story of survival
Photo credit: Brett Brown
April 4th, 2012
05:08 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: A Texas family's story of survival

As we turned the corner into the Forney, Texas neighborhood, we stopped and spoke with a family who was talking outside their home. Brett Brown told us how he stood on top of his truck and focused his iPhone on the massive tornado heading straight for the area he calls home. Brown says he has seen countless tornado videos on television over the years, but nothing compares to actually witnessing it firsthand.

As the tornado hit Crosby Elementary school, the school his children attend two blocks away, you can hear the concern in Brown's voice. He shouts at his family to head indoors and take cover in the bathtub.

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Filed under: Tornadoes • Weather
December 9th, 2011
05:15 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Cops bought on the U.S side of the border?

Editor's Note: Watch the full report from Martin Savidge on AC360° at 8 p.m. ET.

Sullivan City, Texas is unlike other border towns I've visited. It's one of several towns along the Rio Grande Valley on the southernmost tip of Texas.  People here have a close connection with those across the Rio Grande in Mexico. They are cousins, brothers, sisters, uncles, even parents to relatives on both sides of the border. With family members so close, many have spent generations traveling across the tiny border here to visit the other side.

On the American side, the populations are relatively small. The area consists of dusty towns that line Highway 83 along the border. There is a lot of farm land, some small business and a handful of traffic lights in each town.

We did what very few people have done in recent years.  We took the hand-pulled ferry across the border into Mexico to get a better understanding of the relationship between the two sides.

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Filed under: Crime • Martin Savidge • Mexico
October 8th, 2011
09:02 AM ET

Who would Peter be today?

Who would Peter be today?

It’s a question I ask myself all the time. Where would Peter be living? What would his life be like? What would he have chosen as a career?

I knew Peter for many years when we were kids. We grew up in the same town, but we weren’t friends. In fact, I can’t remember a meaningful conversation Peter and I ever shared. We had many classes together and we were both in the school band. He was definitely a more talented musician. I struggled in my attempts to play the saxophone. Peter mastered playing the tuba. I was more interested in sports, since I also played baseball and football. Peter focused on his classroom studies and his music.

Peter didn’t have many friends. He wasn’t like us. Everything about him was different. He didn’t dress like the rest of us; he didn’t have the same interests as most of us; Peter just didn’t fit in.

For as long as I can remember, Peter was bullied.

Bullied probably isn’t the right word to describe the way Peter was treated. I’m disgusted thinking of the days of our youth and remembering how he had to go through his life at school. The abuse was relentless. Students would heckle loudly as he walked by; he was laughed at and teased at almost every corner. People would shout out, “Peter the nerd!” or “Geek!” every chance they could.

Almost everyone I knew would join in. I’m ashamed to admit that I’m not innocent either. I honestly don’t remember any specific taunt or harsh words I may have said toward Peter or his close circle of friends, but I know I laughed along with the others in my crowd.

I watched as he was kicked and I did nothing. I didn’t say anything to a teacher, nor did anyone else.

I watched as people would trip him or knock his books from his hands. I did and said nothing.

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Filed under: Bullying • Ismael Estrada
June 7th, 2011
05:15 PM ET

Producer's Notebook: Interviewing 'the bravest woman in all of Mexico'

El Paso, TEXAS (CNN) - As Marisol Valles Garcia sat down for an interview with CNN correspondent Ed Lavandera, I was struck, by how uncomfortable and nervous she was while talking about the life she led as a police chief in her hometown of Praxedis, G Gurrero, Mexico.

Related: 'Bravest woman in Mexico' seeks asylum in United States

The 21-year-old woman, who was dubbed the “bravest woman in all of Mexico,” agreed to meet with us in El Paso, Texas. To escape death threats she says she was getting daily after accepting the job as police chief last October, she fled her country and the only life she knew with her one-year-old son, husband and family. She is seeking asylum in the United States, saying that had she stayed in Mexico, she’d be dead.

As she sat uncomfortably during the interview, she rubbed her legs together as she talked about the fear people live with in an area run by drug lords. A place, she says, where murders, decapitations and shootings became a normal way of life. She says she fears she¹ll never be able to return home and that her preference would be to remain in Mexico as she’s struggling with the fact that she may never be able to see family and friends that she has known her entire life.

After the interview we took Garcia and her husband along with her attorney to lunch. She talked about the things she wanted to accomplish in her hometown as police chief. She says she is so concerned about the youth who don’t have very many options outside of working for the drug cartels. She says that she wanted to put programs in place to give children hope that there was more out there for them than a life filled with crime and drug running for the cartels that rule the area.
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Filed under: 360° Radar • 360º Follow • Mexico
AC360 Preview: Ex-police chief opens up about life in deadly Mexican town
Marisol Valles Garcia speaks with CNN's Ed Lavandera about her efforts to seek asylum in the U.S.
May 18th, 2011
02:42 AM ET

AC360 Preview: Ex-police chief opens up about life in deadly Mexican town

Editor's note: Tune in to AC360° Wednesday beginning at 10pm ET to see Ed Lavandera's report about Marisol Valles Garcia.

(CNN) - When 20-year-old Marisol Valles Garcia became police chief in one the deadliest parts of the world, she was dubbed the “bravest woman in all of Mexico.” Her predecessor had been beheaded, and it was a job no one was willing to take. Now, she’s left the only place she knows - a place where beheadings, shootings and gangland killings have become commonplace.

Earlier this year, Garcia fled Praxedis G Guerrero, Mexico fearing for her life and the lives of her one-year-old son, husband and family members and saying that threats from the cartels that rule the area became too much to handle. She is now in the United States seeking asylum and worries that the place she once called home will never return to the place she once knew as a child.

Related: ICE official says Garcia in U.S.

In an interview set to air Wednesday on AC360°, Garcia sits down with CNN’s Ed Lavandera and talks about the life she led as a police chief in a deadly town and details the threats she says she received from a drug cartel that targeted her and her family.

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Filed under: 360° Radar • 360º Follow • Mexico
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