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April 14th, 2014
10:35 PM ET

Co-pilot's cell phone signal detected after Flight 370 vanished from radar

A signal coming from the cell phone belonging to Flight 370's co-pilot reached a Malaysian cell tower in the moments after the plane lost contact. The tower was about 250 miles from the location of the flight's final signal. It is raising serious questions about how far off course and how low the plane was flying. Pamela Brown has the latest on the investigation.

Martin Savidge takes a look at what this cell phone data says about Flight 370's altitude.

April 11th, 2014
09:38 PM ET

Searching below the surface

The Flight 370 search zone is now about 16,000 square miles. That section of the Indian Ocean can reach depths close to three miles. Anderson takes a look at some of the high tech tools that are being used to find the source of those pings.

Gary Tuchman reports on why we may never know about some of the assets the U.S. Military is using to search for Flight 370.

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Filed under: Gary Tuchman • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 11th, 2014
09:26 PM ET

Are black boxes really the key to solving the Flight 370 mystery?

Australia's Prime Minister says he is confident a series of pings is coming from Flight 370's black boxes. If they are in the area where searchers are looking, they could be nearly three miles below the ocean's surface. When and if the black boxes are recovered, there are serious questions about what sort of information will be on them. Randi Kaye takes a look at what investigators were able to learn from the black boxes salvaged in previous air disasters.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Randi Kaye
April 11th, 2014
09:24 PM ET

The difficulties of tracking underwater pings

Authorities continue to narrow the Flight 370 search zone after picking up a series of pings. Tom Foreman takes a look at why it is so difficult to figure exactly where those signals are coming from.

 

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Tom Foreman
April 10th, 2014
10:27 PM ET

New pings detected, but no wreckage spotted

Searchers are reporting another possible new ping in the search for Flight 370, but so far there is no sign of any debris from the missing plane. Gary Tuchman looks at the kind of wreckage that can be found, and what it might say about how Flight 370 may have gone down.

Anderson discussed some of these scenarios with former Department of Transportation Inspector General Mary Schiavo, CNN safety analyst David Soucie and David Gallo, who co-led the search for Air France Flight 447.

April 10th, 2014
09:36 PM ET

Sarah Bajc: Hope is the only thing we have

Sarah Bajc's partner, Philip Wood, is one of the 239 people who has not been seen since boarding Flight 370. She and the other families have been dealing with the twists and turns of false leads and new clues. She tells Anderson "if we run out of hope, then we stop asking questions and the investigation dies."

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 10th, 2014
09:15 PM ET

Malaysia's missteps in the Flight 370 search

Malaysian officials now say it was Flight 370's pilot, not the first officer who uttered the final words to air traffic control. It is just the latest piece of information coming from Malaysia that has changed over time. It took weeks for authorities to admit that the final words from the cockpit were not "Alright, good night." These are just two examples of the confusion caused by Malaysian officials. Randi Kaye takes a closer look.

April 9th, 2014
09:54 PM ET

U.S. Navy Commander on finding Flight 370: We are much more optimistic

The towed pinger locator has become one of the most important tools in the Flight 370 search. Since Saturday, it detected four pings within 17 miles of each other. Anderson speaks with U.S. Navy Commander William Marks aboard the USS Blue Ridge.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 9th, 2014
09:53 PM ET

How deep is the Flight 370 search zone?

After picking up this latest round of pings, authorities say they are optimistic they will find Flight 370. Investigators are narrowing the search zone. If the missing plane is there, it could be 13,000 feet below the surface in one of the most challenging environments on earth. Anderson has a closer look.

Gary Tuchman reports on a company that is using cutting edge technology to map the ocean floor.

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Filed under: Gary Tuchman • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 9th, 2014
01:01 AM ET

Ship picks up new pings in the Flight 370 search zone

Authorities report an Australian ship detected fresh pulses in the search for Flight 370. Retired Air ChiefMarshal Angus Houston says the pulses are consistent with electronic equipment. He went on to say that he is now "optimistic we'll find the aircraft or what's left of the aircraft." Anderson discussed these developments with safety analyst David Soucie, aviation correspondent Richard Quest, Boeing 777 captain Les Abend, aviation analyst Miles O'Brien and former Department of Transportation Inspector General Mary Schiavo.

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