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April 23rd, 2014
10:16 PM ET

If the Bluefin-21 can't find Flight 370… maybe these subs can?

Nearly the entire search area has been scanned by the Bluefin-21, and there is no sign of Flight 370. But there are other unmanned submarines and submersibles waiting in the wings that may be able to find the missing plane. Gary Tuchman looks at these subs.

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Filed under: Gary Tuchman • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 23rd, 2014
09:42 PM ET

New twists in the sonar search for Flight 370

The Bluefin-21 completed 90% of its sweep of the Flight 370 search zone. But finishing the job could take longer than expected. That's raising new questions about how the search is being conducted. This comes as doubts grow about whether a piece of debris that washed up on an Australian beach may be from the missing plane. Miguel Marquez has the latest from that beach.

Michael Holmes has the latest on the sonar search from Perth, Australia.

April 18th, 2014
11:51 PM ET

Cutting through debris on the ocean floor

So far, the search for Flight 370 has not turned up any sign of the missing plane. But if it is found in the area where searchers are looking, the next step will be to call in submarines to retrieve it. David Mattingly is in British Columbia's Horseshoe Bay to demonstrate one of the tools needed to cut through a tangle of debris on the ocean floor.

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Filed under: David Mattingly • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 17th, 2014
09:50 PM ET

Looking for wreckage in an ocean full of garbage

Planes are searching from the air looking for any signs of wreckage from Flight 370. So far plenty of debris has been spotted, but none of it is from the missing plane. The search zone is in area known as one of the world's biggest floating junkyards. Randi Kaye takes a look at the garbage floating in the world's oceans.

Anderson spoke to Air Commodore Kevin McEvoy of the Royal New Zealand Air Force for the latest on air search.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Randi Kaye
April 17th, 2014
09:47 PM ET

How submarines pick up debris from the ocean floor

If Flight 370 is spotted in the depths of the Indian Ocean, high tech submarines will likely be sent in to retrieve it. David Mattingly is in Horseshoe Bay in British Columbia for a first-hand look at how a submarine's claw can pick up objects.

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Filed under: David Mattingly • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
April 16th, 2014
10:03 PM ET

What if the Flight 370 search zone is completely wrong?

Search officials say they are convinced they are looking in the right area for Flight 370. But, so far, there is no sign of any wreckage from the missing plane. What happens if the search for Flight 370 is off target? Randi Kaye takes a look at what went wrong in the search for billionaire Steve Fossett's plane.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Randi Kaye
April 16th, 2014
09:57 PM ET

If the Bluefin-21 finds Flight 370… what happens next?

If the Bluefin-21 sonar finds the Flight 370 wreckage authorities will likely call in high-tech equipment that is usually used in oil drilling. Rosa Flores takes a look at the subs that can be used to retrieve objects that are several miles below the ocean's surface.

Scanning the ocean floor is a slow and methodical process. Stephanie Elam got an up close look at how this is done, and the type of images investigators are working with.

April 16th, 2014
09:53 PM ET

New questions about Flight 370's co-captain's cell phone signal?

Authorities say a cell tower picked up a signal from the phone belonging Flight 370's first officer about a half hour after the plane disappeared from radar. Did other cell phones on board also register signals? Did other cell towers pick up any signals from Flight 370? Pamela Brown looks into these questions.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Pamela Brown
April 15th, 2014
10:56 PM ET

Will the Flight 370 disappearance lead to new aviation advances?

The FAA announced the completion of a new system for tracking aircraft that relies mainly on satellites and GPS rather than radar. It will be mandatory by the year 2020. If that system had been in place for Flight 370, the job of finding the missing plane would have been much easier. Previous aviation safety advances were the result of past air disasters. Randi Kaye takes a look back.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Randi Kaye
April 14th, 2014
10:42 PM ET

Sonar submarine hits a snag on its first search for Flight 370

The first day of the underwater sonar search for Flight 370 came to an early and abrupt end today. The Bluefin-21 unmanned submarine reached an area of the ocean that was deeper than expected. It was forced to return to the surface about ten hours early. Anderson spoke with Captain Mark Matthews who is heading the U.S. Navy's Bluefin operations and he described the search as tactical rather than strategic.

Randi Kaye got an exclusive up close look at the Bluefin-21

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 • Randi Kaye
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