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November 12th, 2012
10:50 PM ET

Hospital helps Sandy victims but pays a price

CNN's Deb Feyerick visited St. Johns Episcopal Hospital in Queens, New York, which took in displaced Sandy victims but is unable to recoup the costs - nearly $3 million.

"EMS was lined up with stretchers out the ambulance door. They couldn't even get into the Emergency Room. It was horrible," says Sharon Behar, the vice president of the hospital.

At 14 feet above sea level, elderly and disabled residents in the Rockaways knew they would be safe in the hospital after they were forced to evacuate. The needs varied with some patients requiring electricity for their medical devices, a stable location, or prescription refills.

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
Tonight on AC360:  Still in the dark 2 weeks after Sandy
(photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
November 12th, 2012
07:25 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Still in the dark 2 weeks after Sandy

Two weeks ago tonight Superstorm Sandy slammed New York. Two weeks later, tens of thousands of New Yorkers are still waiting for the power to be returned in their neighborhoods and as you can imagine, there’s massive outrage at the situation.

Most of the anger is directed at Long Island Power Authority, which has nearly 60,000 customers still in the dark.

About 29,000 of those customers live in the hard hit Rockaways section of Queens, New York.

A LIPA executive met with hundreds of Rockaway customers over the weekend and came under fire when he told them they would need to hire a licensed electrician to inspect their homes before the power could be restored, and to just go online and print the necessary forms.

Go online and print the forms? That’s impossible when you have no power for your computer or printer.

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
November 10th, 2012
09:58 AM ET

Charity scams claim to aid Sandy victims

Editor's note: For a list of legitimate charities and other ways to help Sandy victims from CNN's Impact Your World team, check outCNN.com/Impact

As the Northeast digs out from a second major storm in little more than a week, experts say Internet scam artists are preying on generous Americans who want to donate to the victims of Superstorm Sandy.

According to a Maryland-based Internet watchdog company, more than 1,000 Internet domain sites with the words "Sandy" or "relief" were registered either as the storm was approaching the Caribbean last week or, in some cases, even before the hurricane hit.

"We have no idea who these people are," Johannes Ulrich, president of SANS Security told CNN from his home in Jacksonville, Florida. "And what we notice is that they do register hundreds of these domains, in part, trying to trick people who go to these domains and then donate the money.

Read more...

November 9th, 2012
11:24 PM ET

KTH: Utility company's failure after Sandy

The Long Island Power Authority is blamed by the New York governor and others for failing to restore power after 12 days. What's taking them so long? Anderson Cooper is Keeping Them Honest.

November 9th, 2012
11:22 PM ET

Queens resident: It's like Armageddon

CNN's Deb Feyerick reports on the Rockaways, a neighborhood in Queens, New York without electricity 12 days after Sandy. New York Governor Cuomo says the Long Island Power Authority "should be held accountable for their failure" to restore power to 150,000 homes. Burglary there has increased by 7%, police say. One resident worried about defending the belongings he has left tells CNN "They just forgot about us."

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
November 9th, 2012
11:19 PM ET

Doctors Without Borders helping Sandy victims

Anderson Cooper speaks with the executive director of international aid organization Doctors Without Borders. For the first time, they've set up medical clinics in the U.S. Their volunteers are helping victims of Superstorm Sandy at several locations in the New York area.

"We learned our lessons from Katrina when we thought the medical needs would be covered, and when we realized there were gaps it was too late for us to react," says Sophie Delaunay.

She tells Anderson the most challenging place right now is the Rockaways in Queens where people who need help are homebound in high-rise apartment buildings and have had little contact with the outside world since they lost their electricity. The group is helping with a variety of needs, but 60% of the consultations are to assist with prescription refills.

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
November 9th, 2012
11:11 PM ET

Staten Island man patrolling for looters

After Sandy, a Staten Island resident says he's in survival mode, living without electricity and patrolling his block for robbers. He stays out each night to guard his community. "I want to protect what little we have," Joe Ingenito tells Anderson Cooper.

Ingenito has lived there for 20 years and plans to rebuild. Asked what it's like to see his neighborhood in shambles, he says, "It breaks my heart."

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
Tonight on AC360: Funeral for Sandy's youngest victims
Damien and Glenda Moore at the funeral for their two young sons. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
November 9th, 2012
07:10 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Funeral for Sandy's youngest victims

Last week Gary Tuchman reported on the dramatic events that led to the death of two young boys on Staten Island, New York during Superstorm Sandy. Brandon and Connor Moore, ages 4 and 2, were swept from their mother by powerful floodwaters. Their bodies were found three days later near the place where they were last seen alive.

The tragedy is compounded by claims from their mother, Glenda Moore, that she tried desperately to seek shelter in a man's home after her SUV was damaged, but he wouldn't allow them to come inside. The man in question denies that he saw the family, but claims a man asked him for help during the storm and he didn't provide assistance.

The brothers were put to rest today in a single coffin during a funeral at St. Rose of Lima Church in Brooklyn, New York. Mrs. Moore and her husband Damien Moore were inconsolable.

Tonight, Anderson Cooper will honor their memories and the joy they brought to their family.

If you'd like to make a donation to contribute to the costs of the funeral, visit the website set up by a friend of the Moores.


Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
Tonight on AC360: Anderson broadcasts from Staten Island
Snow from a nor'easter coats homes wrecked by Superstorm Sandy in the Breezy Point neighborhood in Queens, New York. (Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
November 9th, 2012
02:27 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Anderson broadcasts from Staten Island

Tonight Anderson Cooper will be live from Staten Island, the New York borough with the highest number of fatalities from Superstorm Sandy. Already reeling from the powerful winds and flooding, the nor'easter brought snow and freezing temperatures this week, along with new hardships for the community.

It was 11 days ago that Sandy destroyed homes and lives in the Northeast. When the floodwaters receded, people were desperate to pick up the pieces, where possible, and return to normalcy. Power came back gradually to homes and businesses in Manhattan and New Jersey, but there are still hundreds of thousands in the dark.

Some storm victims went to shelters, others to stay with family and friends, and there are also people like the Camerada family who are afraid to go. They don't want to risk leaving their Staten Island house vulnerable and attractive to looters who could rob them of everything they have left.

Anderson will talk with New York City Councilman and State Senator-elect James Sanders about why it's taking so long to restore power. Do electric companies like Con Edison and the Long Island Power Authority have requirements that are too difficult for those hit hardest to meet before they can get their electricity back?

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
November 8th, 2012
11:20 PM ET

Staten Island family afraid to leave home

The Camerada family hasn't had power in their home for 10 days - since Superstorm Sandy flooded and destroyed parts of their neighborhood. Diane Camerada told Anderson Cooper she's worried looters will rob them if they leave so they're remaining in their house with their three kids.

"I'm going to stick it out. I have no choice. I have nowhere to go and this is all I got over here. I'm probably not the only one that's bearing the storm and bearing this tremendous inconvenience by the city, " says Nick Camerada.

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