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October 26th, 2009
03:09 PM ET

Frustration looms as H1N1 vaccines run out

Concern about the H1N1 virus grew after it spread quickly around the globe earlier this year.

Concern about the H1N1 virus grew after it spread quickly around the globe earlier this year.

Elizabeth Landau
CNN

Yessica Maher of Los Angeles, California, feels let down. She had wanted to get the H1N1 vaccine for herself and her children, but that's proving to be difficult.

Her doctor is out of the vaccine, and so is the pediatrician. Her two older sons were not eligible for the nasal spray version because of asthma, and she was told the shot would not become available until perhaps November. Her youngest son, 2, goes to a preschool where there was recently a diagnosis of H1N1.

"I feel that the government and health officials, they knew this was big when it first started, they know the size of our population before it started, and they didn't make leaps and bounds to make sure it was available to everyone when they would need it," she said. "It shouldn't be a supply-and-demand thing."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced last week that production of the vaccine is slower than expected. While the CDC had hoped for 40 million doses by the end of October, the real numbers will be about 30 million doses because of manufacturing delays, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, CDC's director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: H1N1
October 26th, 2009
11:45 AM ET

Send us your H1N1 questions!

AC360°

Over the weekend, President Obama declared a national emergency to deal with the “rapid increase in illness” from the H1N1 virus. The declaration could help local health-care providers set up special facilities to deal with swine-flu outbreaks more rapidly.

The CDC announced last week that production of the vaccine is slower than expected. While the CDC had hoped for 40 million doses by the end of the month, the real number is estimated to be about 30 million – due to manufacturing delays. Public health departments across the country are quickly running out of H1N1 vaccine and don’t know when the next batches will arrive.

Do you have questions about the H1N1 virus and the vaccine? Dr. Sanjay Gupta will be on with answers tonight.

Let us know! We'll have answers tonight.


Filed under: H1N1
October 23rd, 2009
11:17 AM ET

Video: Flu fears, vaccine concerns

Anderson Cooper | BIO
AC360° Anchor


Filed under: Anderson Cooper • H1N1
October 22nd, 2009
07:49 PM ET
October 22nd, 2009
04:26 PM ET

A H1N1 flu to-do (and don't do) list

CDC believes that up to 12 million fewer doses of H1N1 vaccine than expected will be available by month's end.

CDC believes that up to 12 million fewer doses of H1N1 vaccine than expected will be available by month's end.

Theresa Tamkins

Swine flu vaccines are rolling out this month - finally. Health-care workers in Indiana and Tennessee were the first to get the nose-spray version, while New Yorkers clamoring for the H1N1 vaccine finally had their chance too.

However, the onslaught of information about H1N1 - be it playground rumors, employer signs telling you to cover your cough, memos from your kids' school, or scary-sounding news reports - is making it pretty hard to figure out what you should be doing right now.

Although some people have already been vaccinated, it could be weeks - depending on your age and risk factors - before you even get a chance at the shot (or spray). So now what?

Sometimes it feels like you have two choices. A: Wring your hands endlessly about something over which you have no control. Or, B: Tune out the static and pretend this is all just a horrible dream. (Call it the ignore-the-whole-sorry-mess-until-my-neighbor-is-sick approach.)

Keep Reading...


Filed under: H1N1 • Health Care
October 22nd, 2009
03:29 PM ET

Send us your H1N1 questions

AC360°

As more people are getting sick from the H1N1 flu virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting that the production of the H1N1 vaccine is slower than expected.

The CDC had hoped that about 40 million doses of H1N1, or swine flu, vaccine would be available by the end of October. But due to manufacturing delays, "we think at most it will be 10 to 12 million doses less," said Dr. Anne Schuchat, CDC's director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

At the same time, recent poll numbers report that many are nervous to get the vaccine, while others are afraid they won't have access to it. What do you think?

Do you have questions about the H1N1 virus and the vaccine? Let us know! We'll have answers tonight.


Filed under: H1N1
October 21st, 2009
02:44 PM ET

Interactive: H1N1 Vaccine deployed around the world

Stephanie Busari
CNN

A mass H1N1 immunization program began in the UK Wednesday, with the country's health minister urging all priority groups to take up the vaccine.

Health and social care workers are among those identified in the "priority" group given first access to the vaccine against the H1N1 virus, commonly known as swine flu.

Others include pregnant women, those over 65, people with asthma, diabetes and those having cancer treatment, the country's Department of Health has said.

From Monday, this group will be given appointments to visit doctors surgeries to receive the vaccine.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: H1N1
October 21st, 2009
01:07 PM ET

Map: H1N1 swine flu by state

Elizabeth Landau
CNN

For 13-year-old Brandon Marti, the intranasal vaccine felt "good," "cold" and "watery" at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York, on Tuesday.

Marti, among the first to get vaccinated against the novel H1N1 influenza virus this week, said he would tell his friends and classmates that "the swine flu vaccine is good, and protects me from getting the swine flu."

New York has received a shipment of 68,000 doses of the FluMist variety vaccine. This form was made available before the injectable kind because it was ready first, said Thomas Skinner, spokesperson for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Click here to keep reading and find out where H1N1 activity is greatest.


Filed under: 360° Radar • H1N1 • Health Care
October 19th, 2009
09:00 PM ET

Send us your H1N1 questions!

AC360°

As more people are getting sick from the H1N1 flu virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting that the production of the H1N1 vaccine is slower than expected.

The CDC had hoped that about 40 million doses of H1N1, or swine flu, vaccine would be available by the end of October. But due to manufacturing delays, "we think at most it will be 10 to 12 million doses less," said Dr. Anne Schuchat, CDC's director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

Do you have questions about the H1N1 virus and the vaccine? Let us know! We'll have answers tonight.


Filed under: H1N1
October 19th, 2009
04:43 PM ET

Map: Weekly H1N1 and influenza estimates by state

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Click here to check out a map of weekly H1N1 influenza activity estimates reported by state and territorial epidemiologists.


Filed under: 360° Radar • H1N1
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