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December 16th, 2010
05:16 PM ET

Procedural snag delays House vote on tax deal

Liberal Democrats  are pushing for changes in the tax package.

Liberal Democrats are pushing for changes in the tax package.

Deirdre Walsh
CNN

Washington (CNN) - The House of Representatives moved toward a final vote Thursday night on the $858 billion tax deal negotiated by the White House and top Senate Republicans after an argument among Democrats over possible amendments delayed consideration for several hours.

The bill, which cleared the Senate 81-19 on Wednesday, was expected to win approval eventually, despite strong objections from both the left and the right. Among other things, House liberals remain strongly opposed to what they argue is a deficit-exploding giveaway to the rich in the form of a lower estate tax.

A procedural snag earlier Thursday forced House Democratic leaders to pull the bill from consideration over concerns they lacked support on how the debate would proceed under rules they had set. The House then went into indefinite recess as liberal Democrats seeking changes to the bill huddled with party leaders to work out a solution.

Eventually, debate resumed on a new set of rules that would allow the House to vote on a proposed change to the controversial estate tax provision, and then on the full bill itself. If the House passes the measure with no changes, it goes to President Barack Obama to be signed into law.

Full story

Updated 7:04 p.m.


Filed under: 360° Radar • 360º Follow • Deirdre Walsh • Raw Politics
November 1st, 2010
03:15 PM ET

What's at stake in the House: Hostility 'on nitroglycerin'

Rep. John Boehner will become speaker if Republicans take over the House in Tuesday's election.

Rep. John Boehner will become speaker if Republicans take over the House in Tuesday's election.

Deirdre Walsh
CNN Congressional Producer

Editor's note: Deirdre Walsh has covered Capitol Hill for CNN for five years. Prior to joining CNN's Congressional unit, Walsh worked as producer for "Judy Woodruff's Inside Politics," the first television program exclusively focused on political coverage.

Washington (CNN) - With an incoming freshman class of conservative and Tea Party Republicans skewing the GOP conference to the right, there will be little mood for compromise or bipartisan legislation on any major issues in the House, most observers say.

Ron Bonjean, a Republican strategist who worked for the last Republican House speaker, Dennis Hastert, put it bluntly:" It's been a hostile atmosphere, but it will be hostile on nitroglycerin."

While Ohio Republican Rep. John Boehner, who would be the next speaker should Republicans regain control of the House, plans reforms that he says will make the chamber work better, he's already signaled he's not planning to negotiate with the White House or congressional Democrats on his party's top priorities.

Asked last week by talk show host Sean Hannity about a fellow Republican's suggestion to hold off on repealing health care, Boehner said, "This is not a time for compromise, and I can tell you that we will not compromise on our principles."

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Filed under: 360° Radar • Deirdre Walsh • Raw Politics
December 10th, 2008
12:03 PM ET

An auto bailout deal – start your engines

Dana Bash, Ted Barrett and Deirdre Walsh
CNN Capitol Hill Team

House Democratic leaders and White House negotiators finalized an agreement on a 15 billion dollar auto bailout, and House Democratic leaders are moving to bring it to a vote.

The agreement between negotiators was finalized Wednesday morning after Democrats agreed to a Republican demand that they drop a provision blocking Detroit from filing lawsuits on greenhouse gas emissions.

House Democrats are meeting this morning to discuss the measure. House Democratic leaders are hoping to hold a vote Wednesday, but the timing is still up in the air.

Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid announced “it appears unlikely” that the Senate will vote today on the auto bail out legislation. That is because the final text of the 25-page bill is not completed and Senate Republicans have told him they want to study it before deciding how to proceed.

FULL POST


Filed under: Bailout Turmoil • Dana Bash • Deirdre Walsh • Raw Politics • Ted Barrett
December 10th, 2008
07:03 AM ET

Democrats & White House – Step on the gas

Ted Barrett and Deirdre Walsh
CNN Capitol Hill Producers

A late meeting on Capitol Hill of congressional Democratic staff and staff from the White House on the auto loans broke up a few minutes ago with two senior Senate Democratic aides involved in the talks reporting progress on several key issues but not a done deal yet.

The two key remaining issues to be resolved involve whether to block the auto companies from suing states over their greenhouse gas emission standards and how the bill can ensure taxpayers can get repaid for loans to Chrysler, a privately held company, in the event the company goes bankrupt. Congressional Democrats want to add language they can reach up to the holding company, Cerberus Capital Management, if that happens, but the White House is “pushing back” according to one Democratic aide.

The talks did resolve two sticking points. One dealt with a provision that any expenditure by the three companies over $25 million would have to have to get prior government approval. To satisfy some Republicans who considered the requirement too cumbersome, the dollar amount was raised to $100 million.

The other change involved language to ensure the government would revoke the loans if the companies weren’t restructuring in a way the government found satisfactory. The legislative text was changed to say in the event that happens the government “shall” revoke the loans from “could” revoke them.

FULL POST


Filed under: 360° Radar • Deirdre Walsh • Economy • Raw Politics • Ted Barrett
December 9th, 2008
10:27 PM ET

Democrats & White House – Step on the gas

A key concern is how the bill can ensure that taxpayers are repaid for loans to Chrysler.

A key concern is how the bill can ensure that taxpayers are repaid for loans to Chrysler.

Ted Barrett and Deirdre Walsh
CNN Capitol Hill producers

A late meeting on Capitol Hill of congressional Democratic staff and staff from the White House on the auto loans broke up a few minutes ago with two senior Senate Democratic aides involved in the talks reporting progress on several key issues but not a done deal yet.

The two key remaining issues to be resolved involve whether to block the auto companies from suing states over their greenhouse gas emission standards and how the bill can ensure taxpayers can get repaid for loans to Chrysler, a privately held company, in the event the company goes bankrupt. Congressional Democrats want to add language they can reach up to the holding company, Cerberus Capital Management, if that happens, but the White House is “pushing back” according to one Democratic aide.

The talks did resolve two sticking points. One dealt with a provision that any expenditure by the three companies over $25 million would have to have to get prior government approval. To satisfy some Republicans who considered the requirement too cumbersome, the dollar amount was raised to $100 million.

The other change involved language to ensure the government would revoke the loans if the companies weren’t restructuring in a way the government found satisfactory. The legislative text was changed to say in the event that happens the government “shall” revoke the loans from “could” revoke them.

“The hammer is the loans get called,” said one of the aides.

FULL POST


Filed under: 360° Radar • Bailout Turmoil • Deirdre Walsh • Raw Politics • Ted Barrett
October 2nd, 2008
01:45 PM ET

Steny Hoyer on bailout vote

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, speaks to the press in his office on the financial market turmoil on Capitol Hill, Wednesday.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, speaks to the press in his office on the financial market turmoil on Capitol Hill, Wednesday.

Deirdre Walsh
CNN Capitol Hill Producer

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md, told reporters "on our side I think we're not losing substantial votes."

He said Republicans are still trying to add votes and "we're now assessing where members are."

He was clearly still unhappy about the process of having the Senate force this package on the House, but blamed Senate Republicans. "I deeply regret that the Senate refused to pass this. This was largely, I understand from Senator Reid, the refusal by Republicans to pay for tax cuts."

Hoyer expected "minimal" losses from conservative House Democrats known as "blue dogs." Hoyer pointed out that 25 of the 44 blue dogs voted for the bailout on Monday and do have concerns about the tax piece. "They don't like and I don't like the fact that the Senate jammed us, and put it on this bill in the end." But Hoyer added, he believes these blue dogs who already voted for it will still support the package.

FULL POST


Filed under: 360° Radar • Bailout Turmoil • Deirdre Walsh • Economy