.
The AC360 Weekly Buzz: STOCK, Sandusky, Syria, Christmas crimes, Iraq, RidicuList
December 14th, 2011
06:16 PM ET

The AC360 Weekly Buzz: STOCK, Sandusky, Syria, Christmas crimes, Iraq, RidicuList

What everyone’s talking about:

Congress delayed a bill to make Congress members obey the same rules the rest of us do, when it comes to making money on inside information. Keeping Them Honest, we called every lawmaker on Capitol Hill and asked if they would support the STOCK Act.

Jerry Sandusky waived his right to a preliminary hearing on child sexual abuse charges. Some of his accusers were prepared to testify against him. Yesterday the attorney for alleged victim six told Anderson that his client was, “ready, but Jerry Sandusky ran away.”
Also, find out about the apparently close ties between the former Penn State police chief and Sandusky.

With the death toll in Syria now 5,000, according to the United Nations, the Secretary-General is calling for intervention, saying “it is time for the international community to act." A medical student spoke to Anderson about the violence he’s witnessed in Homs.

From awkward family Christmas cards to thieves with “Christmas balls,” and a government official who landed himself on our RidicuList, it’s been an interesting holiday season!

Today’s scoop:

We’ve told you about the suspected hazing-related death of 26-year-old Robert Champion at Florida A&M University. Now, another alleged hazing incident just weeks before the drum major died has many asking if warning signs were missed. We’re Keeping Them Honest. Tune in tonight at 8 and 10 p.m. ET.

An Afghan woman who was jailed after reporting she was raped by her cousin’s husband is now free - but she is still under pressure to marry her attacker. She described the incident in an exclusive CNN interview: “When my mother went out, he came into my house and he closed doors and windows. I started screaming, but he shut me up by putting his hands on my mouth.”

A look ahead:

U.S. troops in Iraq are returning home by the end of 2011 after an eight-year military mission. Today at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, President Obama hailed their service and bravery.

Anderson wants you to vote for your favorite RidicuList of 2011. We’ll air the Top 10, one each night, beginning Monday, Dec. 19. Vote now and share the poll with your friends!

Buzz-winning story:

In a country where bear bile is used as a hangover cure, fourteen bears were rescued from a bear bile farm.

Follow Deena Sami on Twitter.

Post by:
Filed under: AC360° Weekly Buzz • Afghanistan • Iraq • Raw Politics • Syria
soundoff (One Response)
  1. ARALE NORIMAKI

    Opposition to the Christmas tree was intense in past centuries. The early Christian Church in the third century strictly prohibited the decoration of their houses with evergreen boughs. The decorated Christmas tree only caught on in the mid-19th century.

    Many Pagan cultures used to cut boughs of evergreen trees in December, move them into the home or temple, and decorate them. 7 Modern-day Pagans still do. This was to recognize the winter solstice - the time of the year that had the shortest daylight hours, and longest night of the year. This occurs annually sometime between DEC-20 to 23; most often, it is DEC-21. As the solstice approached, they noticed that the days were gradually getting shorter; many feared that the sun would eventually disappear forever, and everyone would freeze. But, even though deciduous trees, bushes, and crops died or hibernated for the winter, the evergreen trees remained green. They seemed to have magical powers that enabled them to withstand the rigors of winter.

    Germany is credited with starting the Christmas tree tradition as we now know it in the 16th century when devout Christians brought decorated trees into their homes. Some built Christmas pyramids of wood and decorated them with evergreens and candles if wood was scarce. It is a widely held belief that Martin Luther, the 16th-century Protestant reformer, first added lighted candles to a tree. Walking toward his home one winter evening, composing a sermon, he was awed by the brilliance of stars twinkling amidst evergreens. To recapture the scene for his family, he erected a tree in the main room and wired its branches with lighted candles.

    December 14, 2011 at 7:58 pm |