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March 15th, 2011
09:49 PM ET

New Trouble at Nuclear Plant: Join the Live Chat

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/01/02/liveblogfinal.copy.jpg]

Anderson is reporting live from Japan tonight, where another fire has broken out at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. We also have developments on the rescue efforts and what's being done to help the survivors. Plus, a live report from Libya where Gadhafi forces gain ground in their march east.

Want more details on what covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
soundoff (227 Responses)
  1. Steve

    Evacuate the children and start pouring the concrete. Did we not learn anything from chernobyl. They did not evacuate the children and they will pay for it the rest of their shortened lives.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:28 pm |
  2. Mike, formerly from Syracuse

    @Casey Jones, if the 50 were getting high rates of exposure, they would swap them out periodically with others. It would be good to know that actual radiation rates inside the building. The periodic releases are venting to keep pressure at lower levels. They won't result in serious doses.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:28 pm |
  3. Merl,Ohio

    Does boron cancel out the nuclear reaction in a reactor? Like alcohol takes out the magnetic properties on a cassette tape.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  4. Ken

    Anderson,

    Based on the sacrifice of the 50 or so workers at the nuclear facility in Japan, I'd say that Japan and world owe these people a huge debt of gratitude. These 50 are your hands down "Heros" for 2011.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  5. Betsy, MO

    Question: What is the desired outcome here? We've heard for days now about the nuclear and what's happening (explosions, fires) and we've heard speculation but what is the end result? Will these reactors just cool eventually or are they just trying to maintain status quo for now? But for how long? But what are they waiting on exactly?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  6. Janis

    I'm sure glad you have this nuclear expert on your show, Anderson. His information and reactions are genuine and he explains things in layman's terms. He's very good.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  7. john callahan

    i think the best way to cool the rods are dry ice
    it will work!!!!!!!!

    March 15, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  8. Yuki

    I read about one worker who volunteered himself to go to the plant from different area.
    He believes that this is his mission to be there and do something about it. I pray for him.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  9. Lynn

    In the worst-case scenario of one of the reactors going critical and with winds unfavorable would it be possible to evacuate the people of Japan?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  10. BettyAnn, Nacogdoches,TX

    Maybe the workers decided they did not want to be the sacrifice? I don't blame them

    March 15, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  11. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    Yuki,
    my heart goes to you, Keep safe for me.... I hope you take care of your things and did you felt temor?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
  12. Mike, formerly from Syracuse

    It would be prudent to swap out the 50 with another 50 to minimize exposure.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
  13. Casey Jones - Palm Springs, CA

    @Mike, formerly from Syracuse...I fear where there's smoke, there's fire. What are we not being told?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
  14. Holly

    OMG Anderson tell us that isn't true that the 50 workers have just left?????

    March 15, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
  15. Marie

    If the workers have suspended operation and are evacuating, that's real bad news.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  16. Toni,Nuclear Tech

    Unfortunately,there are most certainly more than 50 workers in there.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  17. Kelly

    Anderson...reactor number 3 is the ,sot dangerous it has the MOX fuel containing plutonium

    March 15, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  18. Janis

    Evacuated? That does not sound good at all.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  19. Vince

    Indeed we are all more at ease to see AC that you and the team are actively monitoring with your pocket dosimeters.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  20. Austin

    You have an nuclear expert on TV plaeding to the goverments to help with tears in his eyes because he understands how bad this is. If this station trusts this man they should enact his advice.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  21. Nina

    Vince
    Are 50 workers sufficient resources to work on 6 reactors? With the situation worsening, why would there be a need for less workers to solve a growing problem?

    These workers, in essence, are signing their death certificate.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  22. anthony

    do they have any communication with workers inside plant # 4, and is there anyone left inside the other 5 plants

    March 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  23. Janis

    Fifty people? When Japan's future beyond the horrific tsunami is in jeopardy, that's very disconcerting. Maybe those fifty are the only ones that know how to do it in Japan at the moment. I agree with your commentator, Japan's PM should request help from the international community.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  24. Paula, Colorado

    It's good you have a device to measure radiation wherever you go.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  25. Grace

    Amen to Mr Walsh for asking where the International Atomic Energy Association is in all this! Leaving 50 people to take care of the Nuclear situation in Japan ,24/7, is RIDICULOUS. Kudos to CNN for great coverage as always.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  26. Sharon Hastings

    I totally agree that these poor people left in the plant to deal with this hell need HELP!! They must be exhausted and this can cause them to make mistakes. Isn't there a larger plan in place for when this happens in a country? I thought I heard at one time that we were sending people over to help??

    March 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  27. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    Betty Ann,
    I agree with you.... That is so scary right now, Yikes, Yes, could be ring of fire.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  28. Nicole Netherlands

    @Yuki, where do you live? Are you near the disaster, are you affected by the earthquake?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  29. Kathryn PlymMtg PA

    Yuki- Please know that our prayers are with you and your countrymen- (It is a constant presence, an awareness of your plight.) How much we wish we could make all this go away-

    March 15, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  30. Holly

    I'm with you Nick. I think they should be honored for giving their lives in this way and I also think their families should be well taken care of.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  31. Nina

    When addressing the risks of severity and frequency with Nuclear power, one must question whether risk management is capable or even trusted with power this dangerous?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  32. BettyAnn, Nacogdoches,TX

    @Yuki I don't know what you are suppose to feel either. I can not imagine! I think I would be num.
    Keeping you in my healing thoughts and prayers. I hope we get relief to you soon! You and Japan ~Hang On!

    March 15, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  33. Kenya

    I fear for those workers. Godspeed to them.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  34. Casey Jones - Palm Springs, CA

    @Kimberly...Indeed, the Japanese have always been very civilized and highly dignified. Quite opposite of most Americans.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  35. Kim, Clarksville, in

    Those poor workers still inside the plant! I fear for their safety.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  36. Mike, formerly from Syracuse

    The dose rates publicly disclosed are really not very significant. If the dose rates are accurate, the 50 workers are likely not exceeding max permissible doses.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  37. Shawn Louisville Ky

    @ChrisInKnox

    that "Blast Wave" that you see is the nuetron ring. it is a ring of small radiation particales that is released into the air. that is you the radiation measurments increased in the area after the blast.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  38. Toni

    Relieved to see u with pocket dosimeters

    March 15, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  39. Vince

    Are 50 workers sufficient resources to work on 6 reactors? With the situation worsening, why would there be a need for less workers to solve a growing problem?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  40. Nick Keefe

    Let's get the names and pictures of those 50 brave souls who are sacrificing their lives for the rest of us. Let's find a way to honor them.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:19 pm |
  41. Nina

    @ Starr
    Honor is an important element of Janpanese culture.
    May God bless the 50 people who are risking their lives trying to protect their people

    Agreed Starr and well stated. The Japanese have always been a culture of pride and honor!

    March 15, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  42. Kimberly Lyon

    Having lived in Japan during my early teens during the 1970's, I was not surprised to see the strenght of the people. Now seeing that 50 have remained behind at the Nuclear plant just re-affirms my respect of their strenght. My father was in the Air Force. My neice is married to an Airman and is now living at Yacota AFB in Tokyo. She is scared, but is exhibiting great strength. We are just concerned about exposure since they have a 3 mo old son. Can babies take the pills.?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  43. Marie

    @Yuki – I wish you well. Watching this on TV I have tears in my eyes.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  44. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    I agree with Mr. Walsh – where is the IAEA?

    At this point it is clear that the utily is not able to control what is happening.
    The utility should be working with the IAEA and/or other nuclear specialists.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  45. BettyAnn, Nacogdoches,TX

    Amen! Why are 50 men risking their lives? Really? Why were nuclear energy plants put in the ring of fire?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  46. Janis

    Steam vapor and smoke look different and act differently, shouldn't it be easy to identify whether steam or smoke is detected?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  47. Toni

    Observe wildlife and vegetation. Any changes?

    March 15, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  48. Nina

    @Janis
    I don't think they would ever tell the public the complete story about what is going on in the reactors just to avoid panic.

    Panic and responsibility

    March 15, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  49. Merl,Ohio

    According to the U.S.NRC this form of radiation can penetrate through paper, skin, wood and cement.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  50. Marie

    I understand that a former GE employee quit because GE would not heed his warnings about these reactors. Warnings about pressure and containment in a stressful situation.

    March 15, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
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