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February 10th, 2011
09:54 PM ET

Mubarak Defies Rumors, Not Stepping Down: Join the Live Chat

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/01/02/liveblogfinal.copy.jpg]

The biggest protest yet could take place in Cairo Friday after President Mubarak defied rumors and didn't not step down. Instead he "delegated powers" to the his vice president. We'll have the latest developments from Egypt and tonight's other headlines.

Want more details on what covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
soundoff (491 Responses)
  1. Marleen Abdelnour

    Hello,

    I am an Egyptian myself–born & raised there. I've lived in America for 13 years now. Despite the obvious fact that Mubarak has not fulfilled his duties as president for over 30 years, we now have to think about Egypt's stability as a whole. If Mubarak steps down now, who will take control? The Muslim Brotherhood does not represent anything democratic whatsoever. El Baradei also cannot and should not become president. Also, what many countries are not aware of is the cruelty and culture that is present in Egypt. Even if you sent Barack Obama himself to Egypt, if the people do not change, the country will not change.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:32 pm |
  2. William Winder

    Mr. Cooper;
    How is it possible for the United States to continue to hold itself forth as the Great Bastille of Democracy when we choose to support the actions of a dictator, claiming him as ally rather than the interest of the people of that country when it is in fact they who are our allies?
    By choosing to delay our call for Mr. Mubarak’s departure in support of his attempts to remain in power, we thereby becoming accomplice in this crime against the Egyptian people; we become part of the official state propaganda machine and surrender our honor on the almighty alter of consumption.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:32 pm |
  3. Casey Jones - Palm Springs, CA

    @Maha...where are you? Thanks for your comments.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:31 pm |
  4. Kathy from Vancouver

    As long as the people are in the square they have not lost.
    Hey Starr I am with you. My candles have been burning for over two weeks now and will until these gracious people get the justice they deserve

    February 10, 2011 at 11:31 pm |
  5. Prof. Nabil Rageh

    Mubarak is now being used as a shield for VP Suliman in his attempt to consolidate his hold on power in Egpyt. This explains the line Mubarak took in today's speech in delegating presidential powers to Suliman.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:31 pm |
  6. Emily

    @Maha,
    "Today our weekend starts, but come Sunday, we should really feel yet another blow to our economy. This might just tip the scales and get the army to declare a coup."

    Thanks for your posting, Maha!
    Nic Robertson has done a great job covering Alexandria. It sounds like there are many people that are speaking out against Mubarak & his regime. I wonder what's going to happen there today? I really hope that it's not going to be a day of violence, etc. I don't want to see anyone seriously injured or die.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:31 pm |
  7. Carolyn

    @Gloria – your truthful and powerful words do inspire, "Because there is no turning back, the people must keep moving forward for change!"... Hope and Faith does indeed remain... the Egyptian people are strong... God Bless!!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:30 pm |
  8. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Emily, "I heard that King Abdullah, of Saudi Arabia told Mubarak today that he was on his side, and would cover any expenses he needed."

    Abdullah also had his nerve to warn Obama not to "humiliate" Mubarak.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:30 pm |
  9. Jack in NL Canada

    @ Casey James,
    Thanks for agreeing. Anderson is one of the most respected journalists in the world. But he can only return if safty guarantees are in place. Would be great to see him return, though.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:30 pm |
  10. Brent

    The comment by Jill D. about Saudi aid replacing the US aid misses a large point. The US is where all the spare parts, logistics and training for all of the Egyptian military hardware comes from. Getting money from Saudi Arabia can't replace that.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:30 pm |
  11. T Kara

    Many questions remain to be answered in time.
    I beleive that Mubarak does not feel powerless and does not fear the people; it seems more than likely that he has control of the military
    and that it is his strategy to refrain from the use of force. He has chosen to play with the emotions of the protestors, rasing their hopes with false rumors only to speak defiantly, maintaing his position in order to dash their hopes and spirit. He spoke deliberately without doubt, secure in his power.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:29 pm |
  12. Sarah

    Young people-Mubarak could leave tomorrow but democracy will not instantly appear out of thin air. Change takes time and planning-if you want democracy for ALL Egyptians- go home, go to work and put your country on the right path in the right way. Otherwise, be aware of others with a different agenda who will take control due to your impatience

    February 10, 2011 at 11:29 pm |
  13. Muneer

    @Lindsey, It all depends how disparate Mubarak is (or his supporters are). I hope the people will stick to the demand of ousting the VP.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:29 pm |
  14. Maha

    @ Emily
    Egypt lost today. Our whole country is on strike, our economy is dead, and we've just found out that we're going to have to keep doing what we're doing to get what we want, namely our basic human needs. Freedom! Did the protesters lose. No. They'll lose if they get violent and right now, everyone is being encouraged to keep it clean and keep it peaceful. Let the others discredit themselves further in front of us and in the eyes of the rest of the world.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:29 pm |
  15. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    America, when we start complainting about our country, just remember the people of Egypt. Anderson, is right we take our freedom for granted and except our rights to be obeyed. In the court of law. We have the freedom to speak our minds no-matter if it's right or wrong. We the people of America. We have the greatest country of the world. Let's enjoy it with pride!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:28 pm |
  16. Nalini

    The Arab world is cumulatively revolting...Tunisia, Yemen, Algeria, Jordan, Bahrain, Egypt. This is very frightening indeed. While some like Jordanians just want a better life, not necessarily to get rid of their King,
    what about those who want democracy, and those who want Shariah Law? Rising up at the same time.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:28 pm |
  17. Ranya

    I'm not sure I understand the comment about the army being "restrained". The army is supposed to protect their countrymen not attack them. The army is supposed to defend its people not defeat them! I understand that the top people in the army are Mubarak's puppets, but the solders are friends and family of the crowds. However, it did happen in the middle east in the past where the army turned tanks and fired on its own people. I just pray this doesn't happen in Egypt.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:27 pm |
  18. Cessy - Chicago

    Hoping for a peaceful Friday in Cairo not a bloodbath. praying for friends' safety and fight for their freedom and democracy

    February 10, 2011 at 11:27 pm |
  19. Aida

    Cooper( Mubarak the terrible) must go home..
    Can he not hear people say enough,leave!!!!!!!!!!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:27 pm |
  20. lisal -canada

    wow – global politics is insanely complex – but interesting

    February 10, 2011 at 11:27 pm |
  21. S Sullivan

    I just wish I could tell the people of Egypt that we support them and even though it is not easy that they have the courage to keep up the good fight.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:26 pm |
  22. Emily

    I heard that King Abdullah, of Saudi Arabia told Mubarak today that he was on his side, and would cover any expenses he needed.

    I wonder if there would have been different speech given if this was not so?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:26 pm |
  23. Janice of Liverpool

    to quote a famous German playwright : Why doesn't Mubarak simply dissolve the people and elect another??

    February 10, 2011 at 11:26 pm |
  24. Tom

    Good Evening,
    Thank you for the comprehensive coverage. If Professor Ajami is correct in his prediction that the Egyptian government could turn violent against these protesters, what action, if any, could the U.S. or any other government take to help the Egyptian people?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:26 pm |
  25. Maha

    @ Muneer
    The people have seen right through it all. They all know that Suleiman is just as Mubarak as Mubarak himself. The uprising continues, no one has gone home. More people are out in the streets and it's not yet 7 am.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:25 pm |
  26. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    Jack and Casey,
    I think so, I am sure Anderson also have plan back to Egypt in the future..... I hope he will keep safe for his life.... I agree your comment, Casey.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:25 pm |
  27. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @Anderson – great point about Americans saying freedom and liberty – yes, we have always had that.
    And yet, it is amazing if you can get 50% of the American population to Vote!!
    Hopefully, stories like Egypt will open some American eyes, so that we will ALL appreciate our freedom, liberty and VOTE!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:25 pm |
  28. Janis

    Stay strong Egypt. I believe there will be a good outcome for you and all your future generations. The world will see your peaceful revolution and Mubarak will not break you.

    Good night, AC360. Signing off the blog but still watching the show. Thanks for great journalism.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:25 pm |
  29. Ahmed

    Anderson, your show is absolute genius. Best reporter of what's going on in Egypt. As being an Egyptian myself, the stuff you say is the complete truth and i appreciate your honesty and straightforwardness.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:24 pm |
  30. Sayed

    Ben, Nic, Arwa, Ivan, and Fred,
    Thank you very much for your excellent reporting covering events of this historical turning point in Egypt.
    Sayed

    February 10, 2011 at 11:23 pm |
  31. Jo Ann, Ohio

    Everyone talks about how restrained the army has been, but we should give credit to the Egyptian people as well.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:23 pm |
  32. Gerry Schafer

    Anderson, I really have to congratulate your team on this remarkable coverage on the Egyptian Uprising. If I am looking for a revolutionary leader, I need not look further than Anderson Cooper. I should know, having been on the ground in Iran and Somalia, during their explosive events.

    My fear is that the Egyptian Democracy Movement will also be hi-jacked by the Islamic groupings leading to another 30 years of misery for the local populations. "Out of the frying pan into the fire"!!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:23 pm |
  33. cicly

    that's how we all feel it seems anderson

    February 10, 2011 at 11:23 pm |
  34. Sue R. Canton MI.

    Goodnight AC360 Team and fellow bloggers.
    Great coverage Anderson and CNN crew

    I admire the courage of the Egyptian protesters. I pray that this Friday will be a peacful day. I hope that your prayers for freedom and change are answered soon.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:22 pm |
  35. Ghada

    To answer your question about whether there is a percentage of Egyptians that are pro-Mubarak: NO!
    As an Egyptian, I can say that all Egyptians agree that Mubarak's 30 year rule has been a curse!
    However, there are Egyptians that do not believe in the ability of those protests to solve the problem, therefore they disagree with them and fear the violence and destruction associated with them.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:22 pm |
  36. Chi

    Influence is an entry in dictionary for years. It simply exists. And the people have choices. If they ever make a choice which is believe to be wrong or right, it is not about "foreign". It is about education and norms.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:22 pm |
  37. Uma, in Liverpool, UK

    'We're fighting for who we know we are. Fear is nothing in the face of that'. – Khalid Abdullah.

    So long as that remains in the Protesters' hearts, they will prevail. Sala'am aleikum.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:22 pm |
  38. Maha

    @ Emily
    Alexandria has been huge! They may not have a Tahrir Sq. but they have an entire major city of wonderfully brave people out in the streets.

    Upper Egypt (south of Egypt) and several industrial cities joined in. Also, unions have joined the uprising and strikes have been called all over the country. Today our weekend starts, but come Sunday, we should really feel yet another blow to our economy. This might just tip the scales and get the army to declare a coup.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:22 pm |
  39. Muneer

    Here is the play for Mubarak (Brilliant): 1) He escalates, being insulating, focuses hate and anger towards him, and away from his VP. 2) The military takes action against him to calm the situation 3) The people believe they had a victory. 4) The military claims credit for defending the people 5) The gamble: military will not dare force the VP out of office just after the drama of forcing Mubarak out of office. 6) The west is happy as VP is in. 7) All demands are met (including Mubarak out).

    Brilliant. I hope the protesters have an answer.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:21 pm |
  40. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Nothing won't surprised me at this point, Anderson. So, let's not let our eyes blink today. It's 8:17pm here in calif. I will have my T.V. on tonight in my bedroom, just in case.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:20 pm |
  41. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Nevine, I meant to say the "Egyptian" people understood what was said.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:20 pm |
  42. Jeff

    I hope and pray the Military steps in and removes Mubarack, and holds new elections soon.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:20 pm |
  43. Lindsey (Canada)

    @Lee: That's exactly what he's doing. The Prof put it perfectly earlier

    February 10, 2011 at 11:19 pm |
  44. Emily

    Do you all think that the Egyptian people 'lost' today?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:19 pm |
  45. lisal -canada

    "i am not tired in spirit"
    khalid – those are beautiful words and should be remembered (and the speaker's name spelled correctly – apologies – typing too fast)

    February 10, 2011 at 11:19 pm |
  46. Joe

    Most of the world is run by a handful of elite billionaires who keep their people in ignorance and fear. Cell phone cameras kind of screw that up.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:19 pm |
  47. Lee

    I feel fear for the Egyptian people now that Mubarack didn't step down. In my opinion, he's baiting the protesters. Baiting them, so that the military has to step in.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:17 pm |
  48. Casey Jones - Palm Springs, CA

    @Jack....I'm really hoping Anderson will go back to Egypt as well.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:17 pm |
  49. Jeff

    I am so moved by these people, What can I do as an every day Joe????
    I want to help somehow...

    February 10, 2011 at 11:17 pm |
  50. lisal -canada

    "i am not tired in spirit"
    khalind – those are beautiful words and should be remembered

    February 10, 2011 at 11:16 pm |
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