.
February 10th, 2011
09:54 PM ET

Mubarak Defies Rumors, Not Stepping Down: Join the Live Chat

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/01/02/liveblogfinal.copy.jpg]

The biggest protest yet could take place in Cairo Friday after President Mubarak defied rumors and didn't not step down. Instead he "delegated powers" to the his vice president. We'll have the latest developments from Egypt and tonight's other headlines.

Want more details on what covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
soundoff (491 Responses)
  1. Nalini

    I fear for the imminent bloodshed if thugs abound later today.What position will the army take ? Protecting the President and Palace or the People?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:16 pm |
  2. Jack in NL Canada

    Anderson, just wondering if you plan to return to Egypt for further on the ground reports?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:16 pm |
  3. Emily

    @Jana, Georgia,

    Good night Jana!
    What a day it's been. I hope that Friday is a good one for you.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:15 pm |
  4. Lindsey (Canada)

    @Emily: I suppose we could look at Tahrir Square as the heart, and the other places protests are taking place as limbs of the heart...together, they form a whole and matter

    February 10, 2011 at 11:15 pm |
  5. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Nevine, "He is playing with his people's emotions and the Arabic speech most definitely was by far more depressing for us than the poor English translation was for the world."

    Funny that some here tried to blame the confusion about what was said in the speeches on the poor translation, but the Arab people in Tahrir Square understood what was said.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:14 pm |
  6. Chi

    For sure this wave of democracy is so strong.Honestly, can't get it when some keep saying "foreign influence". Do they mean the people are incapable? Is it offensive to the people?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:14 pm |
  7. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Khalid Abdalla sound tired and sad. He can't give up, that's what the Mubarak government want!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:14 pm |
  8. Emily

    @Maha,
    "people have been protesting in 10 major cities throughout the country."
    Thanks for that information, Maha!
    There sure is nothing like Tahrir Sq. anywhere else there.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:14 pm |
  9. Maha

    @Lawrence
    No change at all. Same butcher, different name!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:13 pm |
  10. Gloria, Brooklyn, NY

    Because there is no turning back, the people must keep moving forward for change!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:13 pm |
  11. Sue R. Canton MI.

    When I see whats happening in so much of the world it makes me appreciate and always know that I will never take my FREEDOM for granted.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:13 pm |
  12. T Kara

    Chuck's analogy liking Mubarak to a baseball manager thrown out of the game but still calling the shots from the tunnel is right on.
    Mubarak will leave nothing to chance with the stakes so high; he has operated from a position of power and will not leave himself vulnerable for the sake of any real democracy.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:13 pm |
  13. Bernie

    Mubarak is Egypt's 21st Century "Pharaoh": Rebellious! Rebellious against his own people, and Country. He just won't go.
    And just as Anderson Cooper put it earlier, "He thinks He is Egypt".

    February 10, 2011 at 11:13 pm |
  14. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    But it didn't work out of the Bush years either. So, Mubarak are not going to listen to Obama too.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:12 pm |
  15. Casey Jones - Palm Springs, CA

    "I think President Obama spoke to soon..."

    a) We have no idea what the communications were leading up to the Press Conference
    b) Our President gave Mubarek positive encouragement and an open window to save face (and possibly himself) with some level of dignity and pride intact. Mubarek was too stupid to grab the golden ring. Where will he go for asylum or immunity at this point? Answer: Good Luck

    February 10, 2011 at 11:12 pm |
  16. Emily

    It seems like the World Leaders were ignoring the protesters in Egypt, hoping that if they were silent, they would go home. (ignore them, and they will go away).
    Now that Mubarak has had to address them, he seems like he's determined to take these protesters & Egypt down with him. Really very sad, as it just might happen too. The protesters sound extremely angry and they have no leader to speak of. (It's them, against Mubarak)

    February 10, 2011 at 11:12 pm |
  17. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    Maha,
    Thanks for your answer to Emily.

    Jana,
    Good night my friend! See you tomorrow.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:12 pm |
  18. Chari Mercier

    The whole news gang at CNN have been doing an awesome job reporting on the Egypt situation all day today and over the last 3 weeks! The other 24 hour news stations–MSNBC & Fox News–have also been all over the Egypt situation as well. Anderson, you are one tough cookie being in Cairo and getting roughed up like you and your people were last week! Great job reporting while you were in Egypt!
    Chari Mercier 🙂
    St. Pete, FL

    February 10, 2011 at 11:12 pm |
  19. Lindsey (Canada)

    We (Canada) are very close allies with the US and our armies are actually designed to complement each other. If the US makes a decision, we usually go along. I do not believe this is a situation for either country to get involved in, as this needs to be sorted from the inside out. If it proves to become a bloodbath, I believe (and hope) some sort of action will be taken

    February 10, 2011 at 11:11 pm |
  20. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @Maha

    I've had a candle burning every day for the freedom of Egyptian society for over two weeks now.
    I will keep a candle burning until you have your democracy and your fair and free elections!
    I will Not forget Egypt as long as repression remains.
    My prayers include that the Army will be true to its word and to the people of Egypt. I can't believe that they can continue to support such a corrupt bunch of old men!
    (i love your name – does it have a meaning?)

    February 10, 2011 at 11:11 pm |
  21. Lawrence Daley

    I really don't see any change with the Vice President in charge. It will be business as usual. Do the people really want him?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:11 pm |
  22. Nevine

    Pharaoh Mubarak is holding to the three most important things. He can take back what he just gave his crony Suleiman. He is playing with his people's emotions and the Arabic speech most definitely was by far more depressing for us than the poor English translation was for the world.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:10 pm |
  23. nancyinoregon

    I've wondered that too, Mike...how many outside the square are supportive? Goodnight, all. It's a work night for me! I appreciate, again, both the thoughtful and passionate ideas expressed here. It is good for me to hear such clear and civil reflections, even when they are at odds sometimes. Rest well...and pray for a good outcome for Egypt and all of us.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:09 pm |
  24. Maha

    @ Emily
    No, Tahrir Sq. represents the heart of the uprising, but people have been protesting in 10 major cities throughout the country.

    @ Mike, formerly from Syracuse
    I'd say around 70 – 80%. The rest just don't care one way or the other. The one thousand families who have benefited from this regime are probably the only pro-regime people left among all 83 million of us.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:09 pm |
  25. Jo Ann, Ohio

    Good night Jana,Georgia, enjoyed your contribution tonight!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:08 pm |
  26. Carolyn

    Anderson... the sun comes up in Cairo... and the Egyptian people remain hopeful... we who watch this movement, all around the world, are still with them in Spirit... God Bless Them All!!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:08 pm |
  27. Cory

    This has to be a turning point for governments where Facebook, twitter, skype, and other social media adds a new paradigm to revolution and social change on a major scale. it gas to be making a major impact!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:08 pm |
  28. Jack in NL Canada

    @Sue R. in Cal,

    I repsect your statement, but it's not only the US that has to play a large role in the situation, but all counties of the world, including primarly peacekeeping nations such as Canada. However, you do make a very good point. All the best to you.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:08 pm |
  29. Samson

    Anderson, you are doing a great job for all humanity. So proud of you and your team. Anderson please remember all tyrants read the same book. Ethiopia is one undersiege with same tyrant, acting and opressing the citizens of Ethiopia just like Mubarak. Lying and feeding wrong information to US government. My guess is this uprising is energizing east Africa. Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia will be next.
    Thanks to your reporting the world now know the whole truth about these dectators.
    Keep up the great work.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:07 pm |
  30. Sharon Hastings

    My little puppy needs to go out so I'll say good night. Thank you Anderson. I'm so impressed with your coverage and your attitude. We wish all people (and puppies) in Egypt peace and safety.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:06 pm |
  31. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @JD, "In the palace with his billions he said "Let them eat cake" ..."

    That is exactly what Mubarak and Suleiman said in their speeches today. As I recall it didn't work out very well for Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:06 pm |
  32. lisal -canada

    i know it is just the way of the architecture, but the one small square of freedom (at least from the air) looks like an area that is extremely easy to block off from all sides. liberation square – where people traditionally gather to protest – the architecture is beautiful

    February 10, 2011 at 11:06 pm |
  33. Jana, Georgia

    Great coverage tonight. I have to get up in a few hours for work.

    Good night Jo Ann, Emily and Megan.

    Hope all stay as safe as they can be in Egypt.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:06 pm |
  34. Mike, formerly from Syracuse

    What percentage of Egyptians support the protesters?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:05 pm |
  35. Emily

    Are the Egyptians only allowed to protest in Tahrir Square?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:05 pm |
  36. Mostafa

    Thank you Anderson for your consistent and honest coverage of the situation in Egypt. You are reinstating my faith in American news media. Most of the news shows on TV are nothing but entertainement segments covering the Lohans, Spears and hiltons of the world. Who cares about these PPL?????
    Keep your cameras on Egypt please. You are saving lives by keeping the spotlight on.
    Thank you very much

    February 10, 2011 at 11:05 pm |
  37. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    Bloggers,
    We are appericate Ben, Arwa, Ivan, Nic and Fred are doing great job in Cairo since 2 weeks now......... Anderson and I hope they will stay safe in Cairo. 🙂

    February 10, 2011 at 11:05 pm |
  38. Lori

    As this situation continues, I am becoming more concerned that those seeking democracy will not get their wishes.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:04 pm |
  39. don mehrtens

    few comments have been made about how "peaceful" this Egyptian uprising has been.mostly heard from the media is how"dire" the situation is.This is finally a credible uprising backed and maintained by unrelenting numbers of the people of the citizenry actually affected by the US backed 30 yr. leader Mubarack. Any violence eminating from this will come from the direction of the administration that hem-haws about leaving.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:04 pm |
  40. Maha

    @Starr
    Thanks so much for your support, prayers and wishes. Knowing that the rest of the world is with us in our quest for freedom really helps. And it's always the people, not the leaders that one should rely on. This truly warms my heart.

    Some people got text messages saying the army was to make a statement shortly at 2am. It's just after 6 am now. Surely, it was a hoax. I'm sure we'll hear from them again in a few hours, probably after the Friday prayers which begin at noon. I'm holding hope that they'll vow to not harm the people and will allow peaceful marches throughout the country.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:03 pm |
  41. Chuck

    Mubarak is like a baseball manager who has been kicked out of a game by an umpire, then continues to manage the game through his acting manager by giving instructions from the tunnel leading from the dugout.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:03 pm |
  42. Daniel R, Ohio

    @Ranko, 1040pm
    I agree with your sentiments about our need to back world leaders who are friends of U.S. interests and allies. But they must first show a commitment to respecting their own peoples' rights and interests.
    I look my friends in the eye. Not looking sideways with my head down. I do applaud you for speaking out

    February 10, 2011 at 11:03 pm |
  43. Cessy - Chicago

    @ Ibrahim Abaza. Yes. They will enjoy the wealth while the Egyptians continue to live in poverty.

    what's the likelihood that his son will return and run for office in the future? I'm not going to be surprised if this happens...

    February 10, 2011 at 11:03 pm |
  44. Lindsey (Canada)

    A new generation has risen, and with it, new ideas for an old Counry that is tired. We must not take the blinders off, and continue to encourage these brave souls. The Declaration of Human Rights was enacted to prevent regimes like this, and the ensure people receive basic rights as human beings. Let's not forget that

    February 10, 2011 at 11:02 pm |
  45. Uma, in Liverpool, UK

    The US government - and the UK - has enabled 'convenient' dictators for too long. The blood is on our countries' hands, and on Israel. Keep 'em honest.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:02 pm |
  46. Moustafa Bayoumi

    Anderson,
    Just a suggestion for future coverage… Why don’t you try to focus on the remarkable Egyptian protesters who are setting an example for the entire world?
    Do you realize that there hasn’t been a single incident of religious based racism despite the fact that there is no police to protect churches, mosques or synagogues?

    February 10, 2011 at 11:02 pm |
  47. Uma, in Liverpool, UK

    Please, do not stop covering this story, and keeping them honest. The US government - and the UK - has enabled 'convenient' dictators for too long. The blood is on our countries' hands, and on Israel. Keep 'em honest.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:01 pm |
  48. Sue R. Canton MI.

    @Mike from syracuse,,,I so much agree with your comments tonight. I think President Obama spoke to soon and Hillary Clinton is very much on top of this situation.

    February 10, 2011 at 11:01 pm |
  49. brian

    Thank God for the Internet, A new abb: How to stop a dictator in his tracks. He doesnt go away he just stops to stare...Simply Amazing

    February 10, 2011 at 11:00 pm |
  50. Paula, Colorado

    Your coverage has been fascinating tonight–extraordinary events. I'm glad you are continuing live!

    February 10, 2011 at 11:00 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10