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February 10th, 2011
09:54 PM ET

Mubarak Defies Rumors, Not Stepping Down: Join the Live Chat

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/01/02/liveblogfinal.copy.jpg]

The biggest protest yet could take place in Cairo Friday after President Mubarak defied rumors and didn't not step down. Instead he "delegated powers" to the his vice president. We'll have the latest developments from Egypt and tonight's other headlines.

Want more details on what covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
soundoff (491 Responses)
  1. Alyssa

    The VP will be a puppet of Mubarak, what hope could the protestors and democracy hungry citizens have now?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  2. Koye

    I think that the only reason that Mubarak isn't giving up his "title" is because he is in a position of having plenty of protection right now. I certainly wouldn't want to leave the palace under the circumstances that exist in the country. He is probably in the safest place he could ever find.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  3. Gary

    Im very pround of our generation in Egypt and hoping they succeed.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  4. Heleni

    Why did the military made the statement about demands? They were either fooled by Mubarak or they are playing everyone for a fool.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  5. fadi from cleveland oh

    delegating the power to his VP is against the egyptian constiution.
    According to article 82,its only under temporary obstacles- when the president cant perform his act as president-then he can deligate power to his VP..
    wonder what the temporary obstacle now???????
    his act is against constitution

    February 10, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  6. Emily

    I heard that King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud, of Saudi Arabia is on the side of Mubarak and made if very clear of that today to Obama. Is this true?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  7. Maha

    Rose, no one in their right mind, has ever trusted him. President Sadat was shot 36 times during the military parade in Oct. '81 and died almost instantly. Mubarak's hand was scratched!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  8. cicly

    their pain for all these years means nothing. absolutely nothing to the powers. corruption breeds corruption, not peace and hope.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:19 pm |
  9. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Jana, "I wonder why Obama didn't speak live after Mubarak spoke and only released a statement. Just curious."

    Hi Jana! I wondered about that myself. Although the statement was weak, it would have meant more if Obama had read it on camera.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:19 pm |
  10. Mohamed Elbaroudy

    The Egyptian people will prevail. Mubarak will go straight to history trash can.
    Egyptians will arrest him persecute him and bring him to justice.
    We will return back all the money they stole from the country.
    All his regime will also be persecuted and their money will be confiscated.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:19 pm |
  11. lisal -canada

    the actions today made the us look like liars – now it can be pointed out that the us lies

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  12. Lola, Texas

    God bless the people of Egypt our prayers are with them. Freedom does not come easy, but we are with them.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  13. Nina

    @Cessy – Chicago
    EVERYONE got played. including our President. Sulieman is not any different from Mubarak\

    I agree. They are different sides of the same coin and I am delighted to see the people of Egypt can clearly see this and not fooled!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  14. Heleni

    Mubarak is defiant because he knows he has the backing of the saudis.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  15. Mike, formerly from Syracuse

    President Obama should not have been so optimistic about history in the making.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  16. Lindsey (Canada)

    @eva: I know some of the youth activists are actually meeting with the council of the elders of Egypt

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  17. Emily

    @Jo Ann,
    "If he is the "transitional" president he will just be a puppet for Mubarak."

    I agree with you, Jo Ann! I think that both of their speeches were very confusing, and misleading. I noticed that Mubarak spoke much about himself & his son.
    Suleiman seemed to be talking down to the protesters as children; telling them to go home, now. (I think he said).

    February 10, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  18. Carolyn

    There is so much outrage in Egypt, it's palpable... Angels & Demons do appear to be present... Mubarak is playing a dangerous game... God Bless Egypt!!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  19. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    If Mubarak lied to the Army, and the world. Can you really trust him, at all?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  20. Maha

    Our protesters are insisting on keeping it peaceful, but the other side seems to be baiting them all the time. The regime unleashed their Republican Guard/Army, who are known to guard the presidential palace and some of them have been deployed at the Radio & TV bldg.
    Something happened in the few hours between the army's statement and Mubarak's defiant speech. There must be a cover up of sorts going on that the army head honchos are in on.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  21. lisal -canada

    stupid question, but if some rogue general (in any army) decided to give bogus orders to troops, would the troops obey the order? probably, i suspect, as that is what they are trained to do – good thing we trust our own best interests with our own democratic countrys' military and generals – whew

    February 10, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  22. Alyssa

    What if the worst happens? And what about the military, they are not helping the people of cairo because Mubarak still has full power over them, am I wrong?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  23. Nina

    This is the first time an American president has ever publicly taken the side of the people with a strong ally country. Thank You President Obama

    February 10, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  24. Cessy - Chicago

    EVERYONE got played. including our President. Sulieman is not any different from Mubarak.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  25. Jo Ann, Ohio

    I don't think any of this caught the White House by surprise. Mubarak's record speaks for itself.

    I think they saw the writing on the wall, but just ignored it, hoping it would never come to pass.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  26. eva hajaj

    to the youth of Egypt ... you have no respect for your elders ... you have not been around long enough to know what you want ... you have not lived through the times of Gamal abul Nassar and Anwar Sadat ... read your history then discuss it ... you want many things but do not have any plans for after president mubarak steps downs ... take it easy and think long and hard what you want

    February 10, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  27. Jana, Georgia

    I wonder why Obama didn't speak live after Mubarak spoke and only released a statement. Just curious.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  28. Sal sciampacone

    It's all about how much he can steal from the country before he leaves.the USA will let him rape the finances of the country. He should be tried in the hague for crimes against humanity. This will not happen because he is protected by the USA. How dumb is the USA

    February 10, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
  29. cicly

    i have a hard time believing any of them.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
  30. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    Despite Mubarek's insulting speech, again i believe that the young people's movement in Egypt will Not be tempted into violence.

    I am concerned, however, that "agents" for the "dark side" of the Egytian gov. may act violently and blame it on the peaceful demonstrators.

    Mubarek should hand his head in shame for what he is doing! He does Not Love Egypt!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
  31. Paula, Colorado

    I hope the protests continue peacefully. It seems Pres. Mubarak sees the end of his regime as going on between now and the next election–rather than the immediacy desired by the people.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
  32. lilly

    Suleiman is just the next dictator in line. He ignored the cries of the people he wants to lead. Instead he told them to go home! to get back to their regular life. Egypt wants freedom!!!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  33. Jana, Georgia

    Good evening Emily, Jo Ann and all bloggers

    Won't the VP just be a puppet for Mubarak? So nothing will change.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  34. Jo Ann, Ohio

    Suleiman's speech just echoed what Mubarak said earlier in the day. How can he possibly believe that the people would trust him now?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  35. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    Betty Ann,
    You're right, that will be worst fear for people right now, they will not be violence tomorrow, I am sure, I agree.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  36. Emily

    @Lindsey (Canada,
    "how can he not see his lies/deception/brutality are simply making this grow?"

    I don't think that Mubarak cares! He knows that he's leaving in September.
    I think this is a great example of:
    "Absolute power corrupts, absolutely".

    February 10, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  37. JB

    The government only has authority if the people give it to them. When will the army declare it stands with the people? When will the opposition announce it is proceeding with elections? Ignore Mubarek and he becomes irrelevant.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  38. Lindsey (Canada)

    @Sharon, I agree I think the military are perfecting a balancing act: being perceived as for the people, however are ultimately taking orders from the top

    February 10, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  39. Cessy - Chicago

    is it smart for Pres Obama to have a public say on what is going on in Egypt? I wonder what the other middle east countries or any other countries have to say about Pres. Obama's comment?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  40. Janis

    I think Mubarak is not in touch with reality. He will not leave willingly. Protesters should redirect to regular military, not the generals to lay down their arms, leave their tanks, military vehicles and join the revolution. That would be a peaceful outcome if they could convince their fellow Egyptians to leave Mubarak's military. Disarm him.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  41. lisal -canada

    is it true that each family has a member in the egyptian military? if so, and there is a conflict, there could be brother fighting brother – that is horrible – family killing each other – how cold

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  42. Paulita Pike

    Extraordinary job, Anderson. Thank-you for keeping us focused on the honest story unfolding before us, not the noise and the lies.
    Also, very good guests who know their stuff and help us understand.
    Greetings from the expats in El Salvador.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  43. Abera M

    Hi Anderson,
    It is crucial that the US stay on the side of the public. Mubarak has lost the touch of reality as all dictators do. I remember a speech by our dictator Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia when he lost election in 2005, after ordering the killing of more than 200 people, he said he stands to protect the public. Zenawi as Mubarak ia the "client" of the US gov't.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  44. Jo Ann, Ohio

    Anderson, The military are the ones that announced that Mubarak would be stepping down and that all the demonstrators' demands would be met. Were they lied to by the regime or did they lie to the people?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  45. Robert

    Good evening-the egyptians have been punked!
    this was a clear provocation-dont fall for it!
    remain steadfast and non violent and the victory will be yours! we are all praying for you! inshallah!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  46. Nina

    I am delighted to see that President Obama is the only president that is siding overtly with the people of a country of a long ally. Thank You President Obama!

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  47. James

    The US is backing the people against the Egyptian government. If the President of Egypt refuses to step down and starts killing the protesters, will the US really intervene?

    February 10, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
  48. Sue R. Canton MI.

    I heard an Egyptian writer/journalist(don't know for sure if she was a jouralist) say on CNN that she and many of the protesters felt like they had been "punked" today. I have to agree with her. It seems like Mubarak "punked" the world. It was nice to see that she had some sense of humor with everything that their going through.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
  49. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Mubarak just got the people angry and very upset heaven knows what's going to happen in a few hours. Mubarak lied again! Blaming everybody but himself, this man is in a world of his own, not in this world.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
  50. Ranya

    Good evening all. Anderson, thanks again for your great coverage. I agree with Dr. Ajami, I'm afraid Mubarak’s stubbornness is backed by further action that he would take against his own people.

    February 10, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
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