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February 7th, 2011
09:51 PM ET

Goverment Double Talk in Egypt: Join the Live Chat

Day 14 of protests in Tahrir Square and the Egyptian government has denied any involvement in the attacks by mobs on peaceful demonstrators and reporters. They say they have no idea how these things happened. But the Egyptian military stood there and let it happen. We're Keeping Them Honest.

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
soundoff (215 Responses)
  1. Nicole The Netherlands

    Thankyou Nic for the follow up on this random killing.
    Thankyou ladies for using the internet to putting this out, and the courage to give an interview!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  2. Jana, Georgia

    This story with Nic is very disturbing. I can't even imagine how many other people have been killed and we will never know about them.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  3. nancyinoregon

    I don't blame Anderson either, Star. I'm not altogether sure that he can afford the 'luxury' of simply feeling his rightful feelings, though. His role there is different than ours is; we are observers, watching and reacting. His role calls on him to exercise a different response sometimes, not that of an observer. I could not do his job...but as a journalist, he must not be just another 'feelingful' observer. A huge challenge.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
  4. Emily

    @lilly,
    I think that's a great reason for Anderson to be angry! It's the leaders that are lying, saying that changes are occurring, the violence will be stopped. The journalists are not able to report what is happening freely, like they were told that they could. It's an "injustice" to us all! It's truly tragic for the Egyptian people & the region. (not to mention those with family there living around the world)

    February 7, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  5. lilly

    anderson is right, just because he is not there it doesn't mean the protesters have gone away. the egyptian people are in danger. Govt got their way chased press away so they can violate human rights.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  6. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @Sharon – thank you for your post and I agree about swatting away "tough" questioning.
    And remember, Candy is only a "woman", why would he take a woman seriously?!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
  7. Jo Ann, Ohio

    I worry about these two courageous women because someone may be able to find out who they are based on the location from where they shot this video.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
  8. John

    Anderson:

    You have not played the hard hitting and emotional parts of the interview with Wael Ghonim, particularly the segment at the end. Please play it. It is powerful beyond words.

    Glad you are safe and putting the spotlights on the lying dictatorial regime in Egypt.

    John

    February 7, 2011 at 10:24 pm |
  9. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Sue R. Canton MI., "I wonder if there are any foriegn journalists who are in Egypt right now who can cover the story"

    Many American journalists are still in Egypt.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  10. Nissrine

    Wow I didn't know that journalists were so scary!
    The Egyptian regime definitely doesn't like them.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  11. raj Purohit

    Anderson - super coverage on Egypt PLEASE keep it going in the weeks ahead!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  12. Paula, Colorado

    It seems the protestors can't fully trust anyone but themselves–an anxious situation.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  13. nancyinoregon

    I wonder too Emily...it's sad, but how do we know who shot the man? And did he walk into the situation knowing it was mortally dangerous?

    February 7, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  14. Stefania, UT

    I'm so so glad that Anderson is still devoting time to the events in Egypt. It angers me how quickly the world seems to forget something as important as this is for the people of Egypt. I wish every media outlet would continue the fierce coverage of these events. These protests deserve to be heard!

    Don't forget Egypt! They deserve our attention now more than ever!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  15. Sara NYC

    My prayers go with you Anderson. And for the people in Tahir Square.
    I pray for the turning of the tide in minds and hearts today. Violence cannot steal Egypt's identity and cultural past.

    If my generation in America could be as noble as the generation in Egypt, sacrificing themselves for a free government of the people, we'd have a different America.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  16. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Nothing is going to stop Anderson from going back to Egypt. He is a reporter and as an reporter he feels that this story needs to be told because the Egyptian government will never tell us the whole truth. Yes, it is dangerous but that never stopped Anderson!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  17. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Starr, formerly known as vincent, "I heard that one of the remarks made by "state" TV is that the demonstrators were trained by the Israelies."

    Thanks Vincent, I had not heard that, but I am not surprised. This corrupt Egyptian government will take every opportunity to try to label Israel as the boogeyman.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  18. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @Nancy & Emily – I agree, Anderson Is angry and i don't blame him. He saw a lot of injustice while he was in Cairo. He also was a "victim" of injustice too.

    Heck, i would guess besides the protestors, Many of Us are angry, watching the Egyptian Gov. try to "wiggle out" of any serious committment to a real democracy.

    God, i hope that the demonstrators WIN this battle at the end.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
  19. saltia

    I wish they end the trouble in Egypt as soon as possible. The president needs to resign and leave the people alone. They don't want him. what he care about as long as he has his millions.....

    February 7, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  20. Karen, MN

    It's such a sad situation. It makes me feel so helpless. Seems as all I can do is sit back and pray for their freedom.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  21. Dave

    From what I can gather from the news, both sides love their country very much. But for the sake of humanity, the regime must stop killing their own people. If not for the goodness of their soul, at least do it for the integrity of the law. Someone from the regime must realize that when the government turns to democracy, those who committed crimes will be taken to court and will be held accountable for their actions. We have seen this in Iraq, have we not?

    February 7, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  22. Carolyn

    Wow... all of this new information coming from Egypt is so very disturbing. Anderson Cooper you are a welcomed sight, tonight, and every night, thank you for everything that you do to help others in need, and thank you to all of the other wonderful journalists who work so hard to bring us the 'Truth'... talk about 'Open Minds & Open Hearts'... Bless every one of you Caring Souls. Prayers to the people of Egypt and to everyone affected by the chaos in that area of the world, and everywhere.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
    • Terrell

      It's is sad to see the violents in Egypt,but at the same time the sacrifice of this generation l believe will bring peace to the next. Egypt our prayers are with you.

      February 7, 2011 at 10:38 pm |
  23. Lela Lombardo

    I salute you Anderson Cooper!
    Thank you for this very relevant coverage!
    We need to keep hearing about the protesters of Egypt in the news, to protect their lives!!!
    The eyes of the media keep them safe(r)! Let's keep watching!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  24. Emily

    Has that protester been identified yet?
    How do they know that the police are the ones that assassinated him?

    February 7, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
  25. Jay

    Why are the protesters staying in the square? Why don't they start a march towards the presidential palace? The army will either escort them, or stop them.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  26. Sue R. Canton MI.

    I wonder if there are any foriegn journalists who are in Egypt right now who can cover the story of the events that are taking place,since most have been forced to leave?

    February 7, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  27. nancyinoregon

    The video is so sad. I wonder if individuals like that truly realize they are walking into positions where their lives could really be ended?

    February 7, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  28. Sharon Hastings

    @Starr: I very much agree that he belittled Candy by saying "my dear". Also he was laughing when he said it. Sort of like swatting an annoying mosquitoe. These "tough questions" we have for them meaning nothing to them. If they must leave at some point, you can bet they will leave their bloody mark up until then.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:20 pm |
  29. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Nina, "50 billion is not enough for Mubarak. I am sure he wants to take more"

    It is a shame that the US has supported this dictatorship for so many years.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  30. Lori

    I really hope that these people get what they want from their protest. Their circumstances are pitiful.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  31. Nina

    @Doreen
    'Once the journalists went home the protestors fate was sealed. The world now has no way to see what is really happening in Egypt!!!'

    You are correct! The protesters have a little more safety as long as we are watching. I wonder if we could use our satellites to still see what the government is doing to the people in the streets.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  32. Emily

    @Jo Ann,
    "Something tells me the Egyptian government does not want the UN to interfere with their corrupt government."
    I know that the current corrupt government does not, for sure! However, if ElBaradei is going to be change for the future, he has the clout, and the respect of the UN. He could do more now, than later. I have a feeling this is one reason many question his motives.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  33. Allen

    Thank you Anderson for your honest journalism!
    You are a true reporter and a real hero in the world for being the voice of the protesters in Egypt. These protesters only have you to represent them in the world, here in the U.S especially.
    You are the key voice for reporting honest news in Egypt.

    Best of luck to you! Our prayers are with you always. We hope you have a safe return back to the U.S. God bless you.

    -Allen

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  34. nancyinoregon

    I'm all for illumination...and find that too much condemnation does not lead to the ultimate best good.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  35. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    I expect president Mubarak have to go now and protestors are waiting and waiting without patiently until September!!!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
  36. Nissrine

    Omar Suleiman is another Husni. Also another brutal Tyrant.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  37. Jo Ann, Ohio

    The media must keep the focus on Egypt and not allow themselves to be distracted by tabloid stories.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  38. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @JoAnn – I heard that one of the remarks made by "state" TV is that the demonstrators were trained by the Israelies.

    I agree with the Professor, this could be a very dangerous time for the protestors.

    I heard Ben W. report on this reaction the Egyptians to the interview of the Google executive.
    I hope Ben is right – it could be a real shot in the arm for the protestors!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  39. Nicole The Netherlands

    First the police, now the army is an threat?
    Anderson can you get Tom in and paint a picture for us in numbers?
    How many police?, how many army? etcetera

    And where do these millions of the U.S. go to?
    I am also interested in the number of people of these millions who are living in poverty..

    February 7, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  40. Nina

    50 billion is not enough for Mubarak. I am sure he wants to take more

    February 7, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  41. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Please, you know that the Egyptian government is corrupted.From top to bottom!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
  42. lilly

    emily

    anderson is angry only cause of the unjustice that the egyptian people is going through.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
  43. Nissrine

    I just can't believe that the Egyptian people have to deal with the brutal police, an army that is against them and a brutal tyrant. We need to stop supporting this regime.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  44. Hesham Morsi M.D.

    Anderson.

    You make me proud to be an american just as these youth in Tahrir square made me proud to be an Egyptian. God bless you.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  45. Doreen

    Once the journalists went home the protestors fate was sealed. The world now has no way to see what is really happening in Egypt!!!

    February 7, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  46. nancyinoregon

    Oh indeed, Emily, many are. It's deplorable. I just want Anderson to think of the big picture too...and of his role. He is not me or you. His role is different.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:14 pm |
  47. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Emily, "Why hasn't Mr. ElBaradei asked for the International Community to speak up?
    (The United Nations)"

    That is a good question Emily! Something tells me the Egyptian government does not want the UN to interfere with their corrupt government.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  48. randa

    I am so glad you were able to go and witness a piece of injustiss that the whole Arab People live with. It's fear that they live with daily that starts from a policeman, to s secret police to the national guards they simply terrorize people and our generation will not be silent no more. Silent no more!!I am proud,that for once, I hear a fair and honest say on CNN by AC360 about the dictatorship of Mubarak and his likes of Arab leaders.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  49. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Egypt standoff is not going to end good. I don't believe anything that the Egyptian government saying. I want to know if President Obama still giving the Egypt government our money to the military?

    February 7, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
  50. nancyinoregon

    Oh dear, talk of tanks and human chains...scary indeed.

    February 7, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
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