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February 4th, 2011
09:24 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Cairo's "Day of Departure"

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

The bloody images were replaced with a mostly peaceful protest in Cairo's Tahrir Square Friday. Thousands of anti-Mubarak demonstrators held a rally they dubbed "Day of Departure," as they called on the embattled Egyptian President to step down. Their demands on day 11 of the uprising were not met.

While the mood was mostly positive today, there is still tension. Our crews have heard sporadic gunfire. There were also street battles between supporters and opponents of Mubarak in another street plaza just half a kilometer from Tahrir Square.

Anderson will be reporting live from Cairo with the latest developments. He'll share the moving videos from today, and the last several days.

One of the most memorable images is of a white diplomatic van running into anti-government protesters near Tahrir Square. The U.S. Embassy in Egypt and U.S. State Department issued a statement saying that several embassy vehicles were stolen in Cairo on January 28. We'll talk it over with CNN's Jill Dougherty.

The lingering question is will President Mubarak step down soon or will he stay in office until elections in September?

Some are saying the Obama administration should be doing more to push him to resign now. Anderson will discuss the options with our team of reporters in Egypt, along with CNN's John King in Washington and Professor Fouad Ajami of John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Also, don't miss Anderson's 'Reporter's Notebook' on the sights and sounds over the past week.

Our live coverage from Cairo begins at 10 p.m. ET tonight on CNN. See you then.


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
soundoff (23 Responses)
  1. Doug Morley Sr

    Anderson Get home were its safe before you get yourself badley hurt or killed

    February 5, 2011 at 12:28 pm |
  2. sally

    Anderson's Reporter's notebook yesterday about conquering fear was sooo good how can I get it or see it

    February 5, 2011 at 12:23 pm |
  3. Joseph

    1st I would like to thank CNN and especially AC360 team for such a great coverage of the incidents back home in Egypt! I'm an Egyptian American who lives in LA and was following AC360 closely on the news back home. I'm very proud of what my countrymen and women have done in the past few days defending our freedom for the first time in many many years. I'm also so sorry for all the pain and suffering they had to go to because of it. I'm definitely keeping them in my prayers until this is all over.

    February 5, 2011 at 7:51 am |
  4. nadia

    I think that more chaos and certain attacks will start taking place. As the regime realizes that it's a media war and all there usual strategies based on detention, arrests and elimination of resistance don't work this time for the world is watching.
    I believe that they started to implement a new strategy of disturbing the country's internal security, damaging main institutes and more to come to establish their claim that having Mubarak or the current regime is essential for the stability of Egypt and the region.
    What we all need to understand that if this is not dealt with now within the proper channels and the opposition is suppressed it will only generate more rage and will be the best haven for extremist to plant their seeds as they nourish in a society that lost hope and turned desperate

    February 5, 2011 at 2:46 am |
  5. MNE

    Anderson, Ben, Hala, Ian,
    I am an Egyptian American who has been watching you report live during the January 2011 Egyptian Revolution. I admire your passion and honest values. You endangered your lives to ensure the truth prevails. You have done an outstanding job showing the world accurate news despite 1) the barbaric attacks and uncivilized dictatorial acts/abuse you suffered by the pro-Mubarak paid thugs and his corrupt regime 2) the lies the local Egyptian or better say the "Mubarak" TV was portraying to the public to convince them that you are part of dirty conspiracies orchestrated by West to destroy Egypt so people would turn against you. However, I am sure the true Egyptians/peaceful protesters did not believe those despicable lies. We love you and and will never forget your heroic acts. You helped the true Egyptians regain their dignity and supported them to fight for their basic human rights. You have played a key role in achieving a critical step which will be documented in the Egyptian History. You showed the world how great the true Egyptians are with their strong will to fight peacefully to create a new Era and transform this great country to a true legitimate democracy. We need more of honest passionate journalists in this world like you. I am convinced that this would actually mitigate and/or solve many political problems that exist today due to biased dishonest destructive journalism. Honest journalism is critical in keeping the peace!! We pray you come home safe and God Bless You!! Thank you! Thank You! Thank you!

    February 5, 2011 at 2:04 am |
  6. Doris

    The anti Mubarak protesters have shown the world their unity, bravery and steadfastness for their cause. The pro Mubarak and their goon-squads and the police that run the protesters down with their vehicles along with the arresting and beating of the press has been deplorable. It has only justified to the world the need of the uprising of it's citizens.Hope tomorrow finds everyone safe with progress to a better future.

    February 5, 2011 at 1:27 am |
  7. Susie

    I have been glued to CNN, I can't believe we are watching a country in the midst of bringing down its government. One day there is violence and gunfire and the next there is singing and dancing in the street. AC and the 360 team are doing an outstanding job covering all the action. Please be safe and know that you all have many prayers being said on your behalf! Come home safely!!

    February 5, 2011 at 1:17 am |
  8. rhonda

    Mubarak government supporters swinging clubs? Maybe not, they could be the Muslim Brotherhood inciting more violence aiming for disolution of the system. Instead of a peaceful leadership transition with the military keeping the peace, and organizing elections. Continuing violence and rioting will cause a systemic failure: the void could be filled with "The Brotherhood". Something like Iran, Sharia law, sometimes it is better to deal with the devil you know.

    February 5, 2011 at 12:49 am |
  9. Georgia Kefale

    Incredible commentary by Anderson. Good for all humanity. We are now one and the same in these times. Global and the same. Thank you Anderson

    February 5, 2011 at 12:06 am |
  10. Jennifer Sanders

    How amazingly brave Egyptian newswoman Shahira Amin was to quit her job in protest. Along with the brave Egyptian protesters, she inspires us and reminds us in the U.S. of the strengh of character and passion it takes to create a free nation.

    February 5, 2011 at 12:02 am |
  11. Catalina

    Brought tears to my eyes to see the tank running people over. I've been out of the loop and I can't believe my eyes. Thanks for showing the world what we is happening. I hope all Americans realize how lucky we truly are. I hope peace and democracy may reach Egypt soon enough.

    February 4, 2011 at 11:45 pm |
  12. Louise Canada

    Where are the women ? All these man in the streets manifesting to get rid of a dictator and no women. If they want liberty and freedom for themselves they should give the liberty to their wives and daughters to join them and be engaged too. Do they have to stay in their homes and say nothing ? The justice must not have sex.

    February 4, 2011 at 11:45 pm |
  13. Eric

    Your moving piece about their conquering of fear and the Tahrir events of Wednesday night gave me a new meaning of our own anthem like never before:

    O! Say can you see, by the Nile’s early light,
    They, where rally’d, we hailed, at coming evening,
    Tired and bloodied-red, pushing back sieging tyranny’s might,
    O’er the Barricades we watched, were so valiantly gleaming,
    And the rocks’ that they dared, Petrol bursting in air,
    Gave proof through the night, that the martyrs were still there;
    O! Say do those strongest hearts, Tahrir yet save,
    By the river of the free, the streets of the brave?

    We thought they wouldnt be there come thursday morning, but they were still standing!

    February 4, 2011 at 11:40 pm |
  14. Mikey Elms

    I was moved by your Reporter's Notebook segment tonight. It's the first time I've seen it. I'm not a regular viewer. I've just been watching more and more CNN to stay on top of what's happening in Egypt. What we're seeing hopefully is the beginning of a rebirth of a peaceful nation. I say hopefully because your Reporter's Notebook segment brings me hope and a deeper understanding of what's happened there over the last 48 hours. Be well, be safe and many thanks to you and all the other journalists risking your lives to bring us this story of freedom.

    February 4, 2011 at 11:33 pm |
  15. Judi Bennett

    So happy you all are safe and God Bless you for the amazing work you've done.

    February 4, 2011 at 11:27 pm |
  16. Heidi

    I know I can never speak to the Egyptian people myself, but perhaps my words can be heard through you, Mr. Cooper. I *need* them to be heard. Tell the anti-Mubarak protesters for me, a housewife from Mid-America...

    Through both tears and smiles I say to you, my Brothers and Sisters in Freedom, I am SO proud of you! I am SO proud people like you still exist, still stand to speak out and, if need be, fight for what should belong to all people. Your courage, your drive, your hope inspire me. You give *me* hope for mankind! Your pain, your loss, your fear touch me deep within my soul. Your insight to govern yourselves even now, by keeping calm whenever you can, barring weapons from your midst until the need for them was too great, tending to your fallen comrades while still under attack yourselves, protecting for the whole world the heritage your distant ancestors have provided us... it is all so wonderful... wonderful.

    Tell them Anderson, please... I AM SO PROUD!!!

    And Bless You, too, Anderson, for your courage and tenacity and for telling us what needed to be told. Stay safe and come home to us...

    February 4, 2011 at 11:21 pm |
  17. Christine

    To Anderson and the whole AC 360 gang – be well and it's wonderful to see you all much safer tonight. Getting the true story out takes enormous courage and I want to thank you for braving such ominous circumstances to report history in the making. Take very good care of yourselves. You are all very much appreciated.

    February 4, 2011 at 11:18 pm |
  18. Dr. Khaled

    Anderson, Me and my family were very impressed with your essay at the end of the show tonight. We like to thank you and your team for your extraordinary work in Egypt. As an Egyptian living in the US, I am very proud of the my fellow Egyptian and I have no doubt that they will kick this brutal regime out. Thank you.

    February 4, 2011 at 11:17 pm |
  19. Hazem CA USA..in response to Nicole about Amr Moussa

    yes I know Amr Moussa.. he used to be a minister in Mubarak's regime..however due to his solid point of views and popularity among Egyptian people ..Mubarak pulled him from his position and threw him away.. Mubarak does not any one else to shine except himself ..always afraid of any body that he hires as a minister that becomes popular in Egypt ..being afraid of loosing his power to that popular person..he did the same thing to former minister Abu Ghazalah..back in the 90's when he also became popular ..Mubarak pulled him out of his regime.. therefore Mubarak hires only greedy and yes mam people to guarantee he remains for long time..

    February 4, 2011 at 11:07 pm |
  20. Lisa

    Hi Anderson & the AC360 crew it was really good to see your show outside tonight. I hope everybody keeps safe each one of you is very brave. Your doing a great job Thank you very much

    February 4, 2011 at 10:10 pm |
  21. Annie Kate

    Looking forward to tonight's broadcast especially Anderson's reporter's notebook.

    I am relieved that today's peaceful demonstration was not interrupted with massive outbreaks of violence. I hope this is a sign that the Mubarak government will forsake the violence they have used so far, and that the government will let the press freely report what is going on rather than threaten them with violence and confiscate their equipment. Anderson and his crew are doing an amazing job given the circumstances they are having to work under. I appreciate their efforts and hope they stay safe.

    February 4, 2011 at 9:35 pm |
  22. Karyn. Indiana

    The world is watching! Stay safe

    February 4, 2011 at 9:29 pm |
  23. mondi

    Mohammed ElBaradei role in Egypt reminds me of Ayatollah Khoomaynee of Iran in 1979.

    February 4, 2011 at 9:26 pm |