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February 2nd, 2011
09:47 PM ET

Intense Gunfire in Cairo – Join the Live Chat

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/01/02/liveblogfinal.copy.jpg]

CNN's Ivan Watson is reporting new intense gunfire just moments ago in Cairo's Tahrir Square.  Anderson has the live breaking news details on the crisis in Egypt.

Want more details on what covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
soundoff (432 Responses)
  1. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @JoAnn – i don't know if it was Mubarek's original plan (i don't think he initially took the demonstrations seriously).
    However, since Pres. Obama's public denouncement of violence and the need for Mubarack to move Now, Mubarack most certainly made a plan to initiate this violence and stand his gound.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:52 pm |
  2. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    The UN only have a limited of choices I don't think they can't do much of anything until all of the countries in this area comes together and take action. They need to tell Mubarak to go or else!

    February 2, 2011 at 11:52 pm |
  3. T Kara

    This is the time where we will see where leadership, courage and the search for the truth will come from...I hope that it will not
    include tragedy

    February 2, 2011 at 11:52 pm |
  4. Nina

    Jo Ann, Ohio
    Someone has to speak up and the UN would be the body to do it. They need to hold Mubarak responsible.

    It is not up to the UN. The Egyptian people will hold Mubarak responsible. What the world can do is support the people by deportation of Mubarak back to Egypt when and if flees.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:51 pm |
  5. Emily

    look at all those that are camped out there?
    (with their tents)

    February 2, 2011 at 11:51 pm |
  6. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Jana, Georgia, "I am glad the CNN team made it out safe and hope the continue to stay safe."

    I am as well. I hope they are able to leave soon. There is not much they can do there now. It isn't worth the risk.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:51 pm |
  7. Gloria, Brooklyn, NY

    Not all the people want change, but still you don't fight the hand that try to feed you!

    February 2, 2011 at 11:50 pm |
  8. Chi

    Journalist is the most dangerous job. Seriously. Being in places where people have all kinds of weapons to creat violence and against violence, all journalists have are words and cameras. My God!!!

    February 2, 2011 at 11:49 pm |
  9. James

    Anderson,

    What is the Egyptian Government doing to protect the museums and other historical sites/artifacts? How many times has the Cairo Museum been attacked and set on fire; I have heard setting fire to it, has been continuous. Do we know who is attacking it and what they hope to accomplish if they destroy it?

    James

    February 2, 2011 at 11:49 pm |
  10. Emily

    @Starr,
    Obama & others, with the UN and alone should have issued strong statements against Mubarak right away. Letting Mubarak go when he wanted to or make his own decision(s) was not a good message to send, esp. when all the Egyptian people (& world) are watching.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:49 pm |
  11. Jana, Georgia

    Jo Ann, Ohio, yes the extended version of that video was quite frightening.

    I am glad the CNN team made it out safe and hope the continue to stay safe.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:49 pm |
  12. Jana, Georgia

    Jo Ann yes the extended version of that video was quite frightening.

    I am glad the CNN team made it out safe and hope the continue to stay safe.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:48 pm |
  13. Megan Dresslar - Shoreline, WA

    That's so scary morning in Cairo during protesting right now, YIKES!

    February 2, 2011 at 11:48 pm |
  14. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Nina, "What would be the goal of the UN asking Mubarak anything? He has already made his decision."

    Someone has to speak up and the UN would be the body to do it. They need to hold Mubarak responsible.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:47 pm |
  15. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    This part disturb me, I wonder how Anderson head feels.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:47 pm |
  16. Nina

    Rose from Muscoy, Calif
    It depends on the end result of the revolution

    Jo Ann, Ohio
    Yes, you are right, it can be done, but the cost, not to mention the extra time, would be enormous.

    You are correct, but at this point in time, I am more concerned about people's lives.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:46 pm |
  17. catlin - mexico

    Re: Suez Canal… the alternative route around Africa is terribly expensive which would reflect in oil prices. Also this route is very dangerous due to the Somali Pirates waiting to seize the tankers.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:46 pm |
  18. Nicole The Netherlands

    Bye everyone, have to sleep it's almost 6 AM here.
    Dear Anderson, Neil, Mary Ann, Ivan, Nic, Ben, Hala, Arwan all crew and producers please stay safe!
    THANKS! for this great reporting!

    I do hope this situation does not get any worse.
    Some hope in the internet back on in Egypt
    Peace! Democracy!

    Good evening bloggers great to with you again through so much history happening

    February 2, 2011 at 11:46 pm |
  19. marti martell

    May the Lord protect you in this difficult task, you're one of the braves that we admire and respect. You have earned our respect for going above and beyong to keep us informed...GOD BLESS YOU.
    Be back home soon and safe

    February 2, 2011 at 11:46 pm |
  20. James

    AC you doin a good job reporting in the middle of chaos,make sure u have a small army to protect you.The people of egypt needs you out there.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:46 pm |
  21. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @JoAnn – your post to me...my thoughts exactly re: Suez Canal – would add 6000 mile trip for oil and goods – prices would sky rocket.

    @Nichole- thank you for your post. I know you are right, i believe All democratic nations are giving Egypt a Lot of Thought and what to do.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:46 pm |
  22. Jo Ann, Ohio

    When I saw the short version of this tape I didn't think it was that bad, but seeing the entire footage is frightening.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:45 pm |
  23. Emily

    @Jo Ann,
    "That is because our leaders befriended Mubarak and looked the other way, refusing to recognize Mubarak as a dictator."
    Yes, peace at any price; talking out of both sides of their mouths. I think this is another reason people don't trust politicians.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:45 pm |
  24. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Nina, "If they cut off the Suez canal, the oil tankers can go around the southern tip of Africa. It would be 6,000 miles longer, but can still be done."

    Yes, you are right, it can be done, but the cost, not to mention the extra time, would be enormous.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:44 pm |
  25. Ralph ND

    how much longer can the egyptian people hold on without their grocery stores open?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:44 pm |
  26. Genevieve

    To Anderson and all the team,
    I'm glad everybody is sound and safe. Your courage is inspiring. Keep up the great work, but do not put your lives at risk, keep a safe distance. Special word to Hala: as a woman, I was really scared when I saw your video, but you've had an "angel" to protect you. Incredible!

    Back to politics: Don't feel like Mubarak will step down. Army is still behind him for now...

    February 2, 2011 at 11:43 pm |
  27. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    I wonder if President Mubarak is still going to step down, after this revolution?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:42 pm |
  28. Gloria, Brooklyn, NY

    I hope the people be calm today and think about the real reason behind this from the start.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:42 pm |
  29. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Starr, "Mubarak can also continue this violence and make it even worse"

    I think Mubarak had this planned all along, that is why he didn't come out to address the protests right away. His speech the other day was just an attempt to buy time.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:41 pm |
  30. catlin - mexico

    Please do not criticize your President Obama. We have no way of knowing what is going on privately; I am certain he is conferring with other world leaders working towards a solution. This very delicate situation must be managed with diplomacy. No one wants to see another war with the intervention of American, British, and Canadian etc. troops intervening as we have witnessed in the past. This revolution must end NOW! But with peaceful mediation.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:41 pm |
  31. Emily

    @Mauri,
    "What you see now is exactly what has been happening to all opponents of his regime for the past 30 years exept it wasn't reported live like this."
    I think that it's an outrage that this was never known. People were lead to believe, at least by multiply Administrations that Mubarak was an Allie and he could be trusted, etc. The way that he's been allowed to suppress the Egyptian people is disgusting.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:40 pm |
  32. Nina

    Jo Ann, Ohio

    If they cut off the Suez canal, the oil tankers can go around the southern tip of Africa. It would be 6,000 miles longer, but can still be done.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:38 pm |
  33. Nicole The Netherlands

    @ Starr, "what can Obama do"
    I don't know either, surely not invade the country 😉
    But I do think Obama has to do -something- especialy since the U.S. has been making large donations for years. And need Egypt as an friend in the region.
    (did not hear about large contributions to Egypt from the EU...)
    I am sure everyone in the U.S. government is doing a lot of thinking about how and what, and lots of diplomacy (!)

    February 2, 2011 at 11:38 pm |
  34. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Emily, "However, after hearing about the Mubarak dictatorship, it's hard to believe that he's been supported for 30+ yrs.

    That is because our leaders befriended Mubarak and looked the other way, refusing to recognize Mubarak as a dictator.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:38 pm |
  35. Jeanie

    Violence only begets more violence. How many times do we have to see that the biggest gun always wins? How long before someone comes up with an intelligent, non-violent way to solve problems? In every country, even the USA, there are always those groups waiting for something like this to happen (or helping to bring it about) so that they can unleash their agressive, sadistic tendencies. I wish Anderson and his people would just get out of there. I pray for their safety and for the people of that country.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:37 pm |
  36. John

    In the aftermath of this revolution, when the dust settles, what is this struggle for? Free elections, or replacing Mubarak with another despot? Who is the leader and what is the structure for the new order, to take over in event of a successful revolution?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:37 pm |
  37. Starr, formerly known as vincent

    @Emily – yes the aid is a card we can play.
    However, Mubarack can close the Suez Canal for starters, which would sky rocket the price of oil.
    Mubarak can also continue this violence and make it even worse – which i think he is doing in response to being "nudged" by Obama yesterday.
    To me, the key is the Egyptian Army. They are dependent on the aid we and Europe send, perhaps the threat of loss of aid would move them to action?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:37 pm |
  38. lillly

    Egypt shouldn't have to wait till Sept for a new election. That need's to be done immediately and monitor by the UN. Instead of allowing Mubarak's Govt handle the election.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:37 pm |
  39. Nina

    @ Aref Al Khatib

    Central China TV just confirmed your statement. They found two Mubarak supporters with police ID.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:36 pm |
  40. etienne piche

    a cameraman from radio canada was injured this afternoon by pro mubarack the journalist have to go see the army to break the fight whit the cameraman is injure and they have to leave tomorow

    February 2, 2011 at 11:36 pm |
  41. Rose from Muscoy, Calif

    Men on horse's I wonder? What was a peaceful protest now a civil war, between two camps. Did the Mubarak government have any connection with the men on these horse's?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:35 pm |
  42. Jo Ann, Ohio

    @Starr, "What can Obama do?"

    Don't forget we give a lot of aide to Egypt. Obama always said that he could reason with difficult leaders. This would have been a great opportunity for him to show off his skills at diplomacy.

    The negative consequences of this on the rest of the world is enormous. Think about what would happen if they cut off the Suez Canal.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:35 pm |
  43. Emily

    Listening to Ivan describe what he's seeing and what he's saw on Wednesday is really heartbreaking. (he's doing a great job painting the picture; unfortunatly it's not a pretty one)

    February 2, 2011 at 11:35 pm |
  44. Mauri

    @Emily
    Yes it is sad that Mubarak does this to his own people,now you know how determined the protestors against him will be.What you see now is exactly what has been happening to all opponents of his regime for the past 30 years exept it wasn't reported live like this.Also that's why they will never trust him with the change.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:34 pm |
  45. Nina

    @ Starr, formerly known as vincent

    Your assessment is accurate.

    The only time to intervene would be if mass murder developed.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:34 pm |
  46. Taryn

    I am curious to know how the buildings you and other reporters are in are safe? Aren't the hotels in that area unprotected too?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:33 pm |
  47. Emily

    @Starr,
    "What can Obama do?"
    Egypt gets more foreign aide, after Israel, than any other country. (approx. 2 Billion or more per year.) Money is leverage! Obama can put an end to that "Aide" ASAP!

    February 2, 2011 at 11:32 pm |
  48. Diane

    There must be hundreds of thousands of people outside of the pro-gov faction surrounding the square. They should rise up and attack from behind releaving those in the square. These people in the square cannot be left to die without support.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:32 pm |
  49. Aref Al Khatib

    All employees of the hospitals, police, military and any government employee has been told not to help the protestors and to go out and support their so called president. They have been told if they do anything against the regime they will be losing their jobs and not be paid their salaries. This is how Mubarak works and has worked for all these years. The Egyptian People have a choice of being just an Egyptian by doing what their President tells them or they can be A Just Egyptian by not listening to their President and join the protestors so they can truly begin a new future for everyone.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:32 pm |
  50. Nina

    @Jo Ann, Ohio

    I wonder if anyone from the UN has questioned Mubarak about what is happening in Egypt? Don't they want to know why he is allowing all of this violence and destruction?

    What would be the goal of the UN asking Mubarak anything? He has already made his decision.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:31 pm |
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