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February 2nd, 2011
08:55 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Clashes in Cairo

A supporter of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak expresses his devotion.

A supporter of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak expresses his devotion.

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

It's just before dawn in Cairo, Egypt, and despite a curfew clashes continue in the streets between supporters and opponents of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. There are worries it will only get worse when the sun rises in a couple of hours.

Anderson knows all too well the danger. He, his producer and cameraman were attacked by a mob of Mubarak supporters. For several stressful moments they were punched and surrounded by an angry crowd.

Tonight on 360°, Anderson will take you inside that scuffle. They recorded video of the tense encounter near Tahrir Square.

That's just one incident of dozens we witnessed in Cairo. For the past several hours, supporters of Mubarak have also thrown Molotov cocktails and there's been sporadic automatic gunfire.

Anti-Mubarak demonstrators in the square desperate for ammunition were destroying the sidewalks and throwing chunks of cement at their opponents.

Egyptian state television reports three people have been killed and more than 600 others wounded in today's clashes.

We'll take you to one hospital where they're treating the wounded. Some have burns from the Molotov cocktails, others have stab wounds.

We'll also dig into who's responsible for this day of violence and what this all could me for the country, the region and U.S. relations.

And, we’ll have the latest on the massive winter storm that has affected one in three Americans. Tonight Chicago could see wind chill temperatures that hit 40 below zero. The city got a record-breaking 19 1/2 inches of snow. Meanwhile, in Massachusetts, several roofs have collapsed after a day of snow and rain.

Join us for these stories and much more starting at 10 p.m. ET on CNN. See you then.


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
soundoff (30 Responses)
  1. Virginia in Illinois

    Anderson, this is my second message. You've more than fulfilled your responsibility to me as a daily CNN watcher. Now please gather your crew, contact the American Embassy, consult with CNN producers, and come home to your viewers ASAP. I am not usually a blogger, but feel compelled to write after yesterday's incidents. Like others, I want to see more of you and the causes you follow. You have successfully pointed out who is honest and who is not in Cairo. Please come back to us before we lose your talents to a senseless tragedy!

    February 3, 2011 at 12:09 pm |
  2. David

    Anderson:

    Doing a helluva job out there......stay safe.
    Dude.....your tolernace and presence of mind in that miele yesterday was UNBELEIVABLE .....I'm might be dead right now if that was me .....I don't know if I could have taken the abuse !!!!

    It would have been my last stance .....literally.

    Never doubt your courage nor your intellect after that ......BRILLANT

    February 3, 2011 at 11:54 am |
  3. Virginia in Illinois

    Anderson's coverage 2/2/11 of harrassment of media personnel in Cairo, Egypt, was riveting and breathtaking. Saying "thanks" doesn't begin to express my emotion as I saw Anderson's photos "tumble" from all the jostling and watched him being struck in the head. I almost screamed! Then after all that, Anderson was apologizing (no need!!)for broadcasting from a small space where he and two others had to hide (along with the camera crew, I presume?). OMG! I thought Anderson's coverage of Katrina and Haiti had been outstanding and moving, but I think last night's coverage topped them all!! Greatest appreciation, Virginia in Illinois

    February 3, 2011 at 11:40 am |
  4. David Cerchio

    Anderson, I pray to God that you and your crew have a successful exit strategy. Get home in one piece.

    February 3, 2011 at 10:59 am |
  5. Rana

    Thank you for your coverage, really impressive, discribe the true picture, no more no less, picture that worth more than a thousand words..

    February 3, 2011 at 2:59 am |
  6. magdy

    Dear,Anderson sorry about what happened to you and CNN group from the criminal Gan of the Egyptian Gov. thanks thank you so much for your fantastic cover you and CNN and please please stay their inside with the people of Egypt now CNN became the front line of defense for this revolution became the eyes of the world if you stop now it'll be blood bath from this Presdent against the people of Egypt. thank you thank you

    February 3, 2011 at 2:13 am |
  7. Sandy Griffin

    Anderson,

    It is courageous men like yourself who risk their lives to bring us news on what it is like to live in a country run by dictatorship. Your reporting from Cairo makes me realize more than ever what a wonderful country the USA is. I hope that you have a safe return back to American soil. Thank you for all you do in trying to exploit the inhumanities in this world.

    February 3, 2011 at 1:59 am |
  8. louis muscato

    I wish you werent there it is out of control and we keep getting involved in other countries affairs. It is barbaric. we are getting deeper and deeper in debt and countries live 500 years back in time and we will eventually join them because Everything we have fought for and worked for is getting taken away from us. wages are stagnant jobs lost homes lost gas prices high weather changing dramatically earthquakes volcanoes hurricanes floods the end of civilization is threatened. i hope calm comes in egypt with no more violence. We cannot afford to get involved in anymore revolutions. i hope that dont come to that here.Im afraid of our children growing up in these next generations..

    February 3, 2011 at 1:58 am |
  9. Jeannie Louie

    Anderson, you be careful. btw..you are doing a great job as always.

    This is when I realize how precious freedom is and how truly lucky we are. We should never take it for granted.

    To Egyptians around the world and especially ones who are fighting for their freedom right now...my thoughts and prayers are with you. And I am so proud of you all !

    February 3, 2011 at 1:51 am |
  10. jamal

    How smamefull.In a muslum country.as a muslum american all I can say is what in GOD's name are these fokks doing.Mubarke leave NOW.and yes those paid thugs beating people.Anderson be safe. Jamal.

    February 3, 2011 at 1:47 am |
  11. sherif

    so sorry for what happend to you in Egypt if it was a free cantry the real egyptian will be wellcoming You. take care

    February 3, 2011 at 1:37 am |
  12. Joshua

    Anderson thank you so much for providing these history changing pictures and stories of these poor Egyptians fight for freedom. Please you and crew stay safe and give Ben my condolances, it has to be hard watching your home fall apart in front of your eyes.

    February 3, 2011 at 12:52 am |
  13. ED

    It is being reported that the military is not getting involved but in fact are not letting any more anti Mubarek protestors into the square. This is passive involvement which leads me to believe that the military and pro Mubarek forces (Police and security forces in civilian clothing) are in fact working together.

    February 3, 2011 at 12:43 am |
  14. Patricia Lawrence

    Anderson Cooper is a National Treasure...

    I am so glad that he reported that he has told his Mother (and therefore told us) that he is ok.

    I think we all feel like we are Anderson's mother – and we are praying for him and his whole crew!

    February 3, 2011 at 12:04 am |
  15. J.V.Hodgson

    The guy Ivan is a brave man and I would not be where he is for all the sand in Egypt let alone say all the tea in china.
    However talk of tracer bullets is clearly from the Military and being fired in which direction
    At anti Mubaraks or pro Mubaraks.
    The real question/reporting is to prove definitively (maybe show as well difficult I guess) which side has the guns one or both.
    That would prove definitively whether Wedemans extrapolation of whats happening is merely guess work or good reporting... sorry to say based on the program I watched its guessing and reporting lacking the integrity I expect, not speculation please.
    Previous elections may have been rigged, but there will remain people who will vote for Mubaraks party next time Excluding Mubarak or son OK from any transition committee but someone from the current admin plus army has to be part of a Transitional Junta consisting of Army to the top selected general and say the police to ElBaradie. The Muslim brotherhood has to be represented as well. It is said ElBaradei may have their support..? Other ideologies would need to be represented.
    With UN help Elections could take place in 3-4 months max not the 7 Mubarak wants that's nonsense.
    Regards,
    Hodgson.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:53 pm |
  16. Curtis R

    From Winnipeg Canada, now that it's daylight Anderson and crew; get some rest and be safe out there today! Maybe you should dye your white hair as to not attract attention to your self when out on the streets of Cairo.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:53 pm |
  17. Bob

    The middle east has been this way for thousands and thousands of years. The middle east is the most volatile, the most unstable region in the world. Every country or state in the middle east is either a dictatorship or a terrorist state. Everyone, including myself is hoping for a peaceful democracy, but the way to a peaceful democracy is a long one... Don't underestimate mubarack, the dictators seem to have only one skill, that is to preserve themselves in power, no matter the cost... I first read Professor Ajami's amazing articles on the middle east in academic circles, after 9-11. Professor Ajami should be counseling the Obama administration on this very complex subject...

    February 2, 2011 at 11:44 pm |
  18. chicago

    I would like say the US should stop aid to Egypt and and Israel they are same. Egypt with its people and Israel with the west bank. The wall is like east and west Germany. Can someone tell me what's the differents?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:33 pm |
  19. Audrey

    Anderson, please be careful. Sometimes the price for freedom (and honesty) can be high. I also agree with Hossam: freeze the money and get
    Mubarek"s attention. It's one thing to be forced out and lose face- it another thing to do it broke.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:29 pm |
  20. Bill

    Anderson, I was shocked to hear about the attack on you and your crew. My heart goes out to you and them.Please be careful. I think you're one awesome journalist, and an asset to CNN....This is the first time I have ever done anything like this,meaning to write in a blog....but I was just so concerned and surprised that a person such as yourself had this happen to you.....

    February 2, 2011 at 11:00 pm |
  21. John Ottman

    For God Sakes, The U.S. needs an immediate congressional resolution threatening to withdrawal all foreign aid until internet access and communications are restored and government-backed thugs are thwarted by the Egyptian military. We can no longer look the other way for all that we stand for.

    February 2, 2011 at 10:53 pm |
  22. Daphine

    With the escallation in violence, what is the status of the military? Can we be sure that Mubarek is sending in the thugs or could it be a ploy to gain sympathy by using the media to show these acts as a means to build up outside support against Mubarek? The reason I ask, is that it would not be the first time outside forces have interfered in another nation's chaos to try to influence the outcome.

    February 2, 2011 at 10:52 pm |
  23. Kathleen Allen

    Another great job from Anderson Cooper and his team, but...GET OUT OF THERE! (I know, I'm yelling.)

    February 2, 2011 at 10:47 pm |
  24. Lin

    There is no way Mubarek can justify sending in thugs on horses and camels with whips, throwing Molotov cocktails at crowds which include women and children, paying thugs to shoot peaceful protesters, and beating up journalists. If he didn't order and pay them to do so he should have demanded the army arrest them. Hossam is right – freeze all of his assets in the U.S. now!

    February 2, 2011 at 9:58 pm |
  25. Jacqueline Elmarhoumy

    Anderson, be careful you are doing a wonderful job, you are the reason I watch CNN because you do keep them honest. Be safe and keep up the exceptional work.

    February 2, 2011 at 9:42 pm |
  26. Jacqueline Elmarhoumy

    Mobarek should be made to step down the only reason this is being allowed to continue is the concern over Isrel security is more precious than the right of the Egyptian people. So sad that we would condone Mobareks mess for the sake of Isreal. Everyone is aware that Mobarke is calling the cheap shots by sending his undercover thugs in. Wow, how we pick and choose when and who we help.

    February 2, 2011 at 9:40 pm |
  27. Hossam

    I am Egyptian living in the US and I would like o offer my apologies to what happened to you today in Cairo. These “hired gangs” or the so called pro-Mubarak have all to gain from what happened today. They just want Cameras to be away so they can do what they want with the protestors. If they are there to support Mubarak then they would want Cameras of the world to be rolling to show that he still has “some support” somewhere in Egypt.
    The US can do things to help: freeze Mubarak’s family assets in the US- $ 40 Billion. This will let him listen. Stopping the aid will hurt the Egyptians!
    We thank you; thank CNN and all other reports who are fairly trying to let us know what is happening back in Egypt and we hope that the situation ends soon before things gets more ugly than they are.

    Hossam

    February 2, 2011 at 9:25 pm |
  28. Annie Kate

    Sounds like a really good show coming up. The metamorphosis of a peaceful demonstration into a violent one probably is not surprising but I hope Mubarak will step down and things will calm down. With the direction this demonstration is going right now, it could turn into a very bloody/deadly revolution fairly easily.

    The snow here in the US and its temperatures are staggering; I hope the groundhog, Paxwutany Phil is right in that there will be spring soon. I know we could all use it.

    February 2, 2011 at 9:17 pm |
  29. Patricia Wolfe

    Be safe and come home! We can't afford to lose the team that "keeps us honest!" wonderful job but be careful.

    February 2, 2011 at 9:15 pm |
  30. Dona Elliott

    I was in Egypt this summer and they sleep during the day. So it is not unusual for them to stay up all night. Especially since electricity is so expensive. Of course the situation is out of control but it is not unusual for them to be up at night.

    February 2, 2011 at 9:03 pm |