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May 7th, 2010
01:40 PM ET
May 7th, 2010
11:05 AM ET

Video: Escape from the Taliban

Anderson Cooper | BIO
AC360° Anchor

Program Note: See the full interview on AC360° tonight at 10pm eastern

In the fall of 2008, David Rohde traveled to Afghanistan to do some reporting for a book about the region. He and two Afghan colleagues were kidnapped by the Taliban and held for seven months. He was held in the North Waziristan region of Pakistan, less than a half mile away from a Pakistani military base.

After seven months and ten days in captivity, Rohde made a daring escape. In the dark of night, Rohde and another captive used a rope to lower themselves down a wall and made a run for it, trying desperately to reach the nearby base.

Intelligence now indicates Rohde may have been captured by the same people who trained the Times Square bombing suspect, Faisal Shahzad.

Rohde speaks to Anderson in his first Primetime Exclusive… about his captivity, his escape, the Taliban's presence in Pakistan and their ability to attack the United States.

Watch the full interview tonight.


Filed under: Anderson Cooper • Pakistan • Taliban
May 7th, 2010
10:42 AM ET

Mosque to go up near New York's ground zero

Nicole Bliman
CNN

The mosque project has gotten mixed reviews from families and friends of 9/11 victims.

The mosque project has gotten mixed reviews from families and friends of 9/11 victims.

Plans to build a mosque two blocks away from ground zero have set off an emotional debate among area residents and relatives of victims of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.

Cordoba House project calls for a 15-story community center including a mosque, performance art center, gym, swimming pool and other public spaces.

The project is a collaboration between the American Society for Muslim Advancement and the Cordoba Initiative, both of which work to improve relations with followers of the religion.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Islam
May 7th, 2010
10:34 AM ET

Containment dome lowered at oil leak site

CNN Wire Staff

The four-story oil containment dome made its way beneath the Gulf of Mexico early Friday to capture leaking oil.

The four-story oil containment dome made its way beneath the Gulf of Mexico early Friday to capture leaking oil.

A massive dome began its descent into the Gulf of Mexico to cap a gushing oil leak about 5,000 feet below the surface, a BP official said Friday.

The arduous process of lowering the four-story containment dome and getting it in place is expected to continue into the weekend. The technique has never been attempted at the depth of the leak spewing from the sunken oil rig, officials said.

"If all goes according to plan by early next week, we hope to make it operational," said Doug Suttles, chief operating officer of BP. "As we always do, though, we stress this has never been done before. We'll likely encounter numerous challenges, but we'll remain committed to make it work."

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Gulf Oil Spill
May 7th, 2010
10:11 AM ET

U.S. extends travel warning to Mexico

CNN Wire Staff

People wait in line at the border of the United States and Mexico.

People wait in line at the border of the United States and Mexico.

The U.S. State Department on Thursday extended a travel warning that had been issued for Mexico because of the region's high level of drug and gang violence.

The State Department warning also notes that the authorized departure of family members of U.S. government personnel from U.S. consulates in the northern Mexico border cities of Tijuana, Nogales, Ciudad Juarez, Nuevo Laredo, Monterrey and Matamoros has been extended.

The State Department issued similar warnings in March and April.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Mexico
May 7th, 2010
09:48 AM ET

Video: Rescuing Nashville

Anderson Cooper | BIO
AC360° Anchor


Filed under: Anderson Cooper • Weather
May 7th, 2010
09:45 AM ET

Video: Father, son rescue team

Anderson Cooper | BIO
AC360° Anchor


Filed under: Anderson Cooper • Weather
May 7th, 2010
09:43 AM ET

Video: Brad Paisley on Nashville flooding

Anderson Cooper | BIO
AC360° Anchor


Filed under: Anderson Cooper • Weather
May 7th, 2010
09:12 AM ET

Dear President Obama #473: "It's Greek to me"

Tom Foreman | BIO
AC360° Correspondent

Riots in the streets of Athens caused panic on one street in New York.  Or at least that’s what some analysts of the high-finance world would have us believe

Riots in the streets of Athens caused panic on one street in New York. Or at least that’s what some analysts of the high-finance world would have us believe

Reporter's Note: Riots in the streets of Athens caused panic on one street in New York. Or at least that’s what some analysts of the high-finance world would have us believe. Amid the turmoil, I write my next letter to the White House. At least I’m reliable!

Dear Mr. President,

Is there someone to whom I can surrender? I am ready to give up whatever faint, feeble, delusional hope I’ve ever had of understanding the behavior of the financial markets. I’ll hand over my credit cards, my copy of Rich Dad/Poor Dad, my Magic 8 Ball, and I’ll delete Ali Velshi’s private number from my cell phone.

This fit of despair comes in the wake of the Tilt-A-Whirl whip of the stock market. (Btw, please note, my private campaign to retire the phrase “roller coaster ride.” Haven’t we had enough of that?)

So the Dow dropped a thousand points in a matter of minutes, based on a one-two punch. First, the Greek riots got everyone jumpy about a possible meltdown in the European markets. Then some trader spilled his latte into his computer, or dropped a muffin on it, or punched the wrong number in or something like that, and it suddenly looked as if Proctor and Gamble had just been vaporized. Not a good thing.

Both events apparently made the whole bull and bear crowd squeal like second grade girls and start heaving stocks overboard as if they were on fire. Honestly, is this any way to run an economy? The Greeks grumble, Todd forgets his glasses, and the foundation of our whole market system shakes. Ridiculous.

Frankly this is why I don’t trust that whole Wall Street crew when they insist that they just have to have all those massive bonuses. “Why, without that money, we’d lose all the top talent that makes the market such a wonder!” Uh huh. So where were those geniuses today when everyone started running from shadows? I don’t recall one of these intellectual giants of finance stepping up and saying loudly and clearly, “Hold on, everyone. Let’s figure out what is really going on before we let a bunch of knee-jerk reactions fire a slug at our struggling economy.”

Next time you have that pack down to DC for a chat, ask them about that. In the meantime, you might want to print out a chart of the market trend line from today, and when you start hearing that old refrain about how brilliant the Wall Streeters are, just pull one out and start fanning yourself with it.

Here’s another idea: Pull out your phone and give me call! Feels like forever since we’ve talked. Because, uh, it has been.

Regards,
Tom

May 7th, 2010
06:32 AM ET

The Gulf versus Valdez: and the winner (or loser) is...

Tom Foreman | BIO
AC360° Correspondent

Closer scrutiny of the Exxon Valdez and Deepwater Horizon accidents, however, reveal profound differences along with the similarities.

Closer scrutiny of the Exxon Valdez and Deepwater Horizon accidents, however, reveal profound differences along with the similarities.

Cry havoc and unleash the experts! Over the past week or so, the public arena has been filled with the voices of people who know (or purport to know) precisely how bad the oil spill in the Gulf will ultimately be, and time and again, one word keeps coming up: Valdez. The worst oil spill in the nation’s history has loomed like a dark, dripping specter over all that has happened since that Gulf rig exploded and sank, killing close to a dozen people, and unleashing a torrent from a wellhead far beneath the waves.

Closer scrutiny of the Exxon Valdez and Deepwater Horizon accidents, however, reveal profound differences along with the similarities.

First, let’s consider the amount of oil. If we do the math on the Gulf spill, based on the official estimates of how much oil is pumping up every day, we end up with around 3.5 million gallons spilled so far. That’s a bit less than a third of the 11 million gallons spilled in Valdez. But there are important differences to note here. The Valdez spill came pretty much all at once. It rushed into the beautiful and pristine waters of Prince William Sound and went to shore immediately; giving neither marines mammals, birds, sea life, nor humans much time to react or try to stop it. The Gulf spill has been a gradual process. But it has been constant. We don’t know when it is going to end. And so, while it lags behind Valdez now, it could greatly surpass it if that big dome-under-the-sea plan does not stop the flow.

FULL POST


Filed under: Gulf Oil Spill • Tom Foreman
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