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August 14th, 2009
10:10 PM ET

Impact Your World: Typhoon Morakot

Luo Shou Luan (left) is comforted as she looks at what is left of her home village, Shiao Lin.

Luo Shou Luan (left) is comforted as she looks at what is left of her home village, Shiao Lin.

Program Note: For the latest on Typhoon Morakot, including information about the thousands of people still stranded from the typhoon last weekend, tune in to AC360° tonight at 10p ET. Below is a link to CNN's special section 'Impact Your World' with information about how to get involved.

Impact Your World

Typhoon Morakot unleashed its fury in Taiwan and mainland China and caused some of the worst flooding in a half-century. Dozens have died or are missing, with scores displaced or stranded.

Take action on the news you consume! These resources include some of the highest-rated charities by CharityNavigator.org (an independent and non-profit organization that evaluates and rates thousands of charity groups based on effectiveness and financial stability) and are vetted by CNN journalists for credibility. CNN does not endorse any organization and information is provided as an inspiration for you to explore the best ways for you to impact your world.

Click here to learn more about how you can help.

Program Note: For more ways to make a difference, visit Impact Your World.


Filed under: 360° Radar • Impact Your World • Weather
soundoff (7 Responses)
  1. infoseek

    Ma Ying-Jeou’s Morakot

    The torrential rain and flood delayed immediate rescue efforts. Military personnel and heavy equipments could not be mobilized. Helicopters were grounded. Rapid currents wiped out the few roads, bridges and infrastructures of this remote rural area. Morakot befall more challenging rescues than the breach of levees during and after Katrina.

    Temporary shelters, food, water, civil orders of the effected and dislocated victims were well positioned and prepared to the point blames went viral throughout bleak weather openings for rescues.

    I'm certain more than sufficient military hardware and manpower from nearby Mainland China were more than readily to be deployed. I'm sure Mainland China was more than eager to announce their aids in the media, but I think we and the Taiwanese will hear more about our (US) aids for obvious reasons. Please also keep in mind this is an island politically and ethnically divided with just about 1:1 ratio.

    The government failed to evacuate the effected areas prior to the arrival of Morakot. Weather permitted massive airlift evacuations weren't too little, but they were too late. This is an island in the path of many typhoons without history of evacuation.

    Unlike Bush's Katrina, Ma Ying-Jeou did what he could and accepted the blames. Like Bush's Katrina, Ma Ying-Jeou is paying the price.

    More acceptable version

    August 17, 2009 at 3:04 am |
  2. infoseek

    Ma Ying-Jeou’s Morakot

    The torrential rain and flood delayed immediate rescue efforts. Military personnel and heavy equipments could not be mobilized. Helicopters were grounded. Rapid currents wiped out the few roads, bridges and infrastructures of this remote rural area. Morakot befall more challenging rescues than the breach of levees during and after Katrina.

    Temporary shelters, food, water, civil orders of the effected and dislocated victims were well positioned and prepared to the point blames went viral throughout bleak weather openings for rescues.

    I'm certain more than sufficient military hardware and manpower from nearby Mainland China were more than readily to be deployed. I'm sure Mainland China was more than eager to announce their aids in the media, but I think we and the Taiwanese will hear more about our (US) aids for obvious reasons. Please also keep in mind this is an island politically and ethnically divided with just about 1:1 ratio.

    The government failed to evacuate the effected areas prior to the arrival of Morakot. Weather permitted massive airlift evacuations weren't too little, but they were too late. This is an island in the path of many typhoons without history of evacuation.

    Unlike Bush's Katrina, Ma Ying-Jeou did what he could and accepted the blames. Like Bush's Katrina, Ma Ying-Jeou is paying the price.

    ETTV isn't what I would consider an equatable CNN arm. Unhook them for now. Please?

    August 17, 2009 at 3:03 am |
  3. Martin T

    To all CNN reporters covering the aftermath of Typhoon Morakot:

    Please stop criticizing the Taiwanese government for its reaction towards this disaster. You must understand that the magnitude of this disaster is much worse than you can imagine. Access to the affected areas is very limited and dangerous at the same time, and the safety of the rescuers must also be considered. Rescue personnel are trying their very best to do their jobs.
    You guys do wonderful jobs to report the status of the affected areas, but there is no need to say things like President Ma is not doing his best to help the victims, or that he is making excuses towards this disaster.
    Remember, Taiwan is experiencing "some of the worst flooding in a half-century".
    Please also know that there is no president in the world who is able to satisfy/comfort every victim in this kind of extreme situation.

    August 17, 2009 at 2:48 am |
  4. M

    Dear Anderson ,

    Thank you and your team members reporting Taiwan Typhoon- Morakot news.

    I want to thank you because
    1. What you have reported is fair and accurated. Your reporters shown their sympathy and carings to Taiwanese.

    2. Because of the reports, people in the world are aware of the global warming and climate change.

    3. and I appreciated you see Taiwan as a one nation Taiwan , not Taiwan, China .

    4. I really appreciated you sent your reporters to those dangerous areas to investigate the truth of what happened in the country.

    5. Similar to Hurricane Katrina happened in New Orleans, USA, those people whose home were destroyed and killed by Typhoon were poor people and weak people. Most of them were Native Taiwanese (similar to Native American, tribal villages) They really need help.

    Because of the news report, the world offered help and donation to Taiwan . USA goverment even sent military supports to help Taiwan.

    I think the reason I wrote you this email because, even though there were a 30 seconds to 2 minutes news report daily, but it is a big impact to a lot of us.. It shows that you and your team members care.

    A lot of big TV stations don’t even bother to report such small country like Taiwan , but you do.

    I think that is the difference you have made.

    And now, I believed that AC360 is a TV news truly fair, democratic, unrestricted and open minded.

    It is a small action that make big impact.

    M

    August 16, 2009 at 11:41 pm |
  5. Julie

    I'd like to say thank you to CNN and many other international media for your extensive coverage on this disaster.

    It started off as a natural disaster that no one has seen in a very long time, yet it is becoming a human disaster due to slow relief efforts by the Ma administration.

    The people of Taiwan really appreciate the international coverage it has received recently, so that the world is aware of the plight of our brave and resilient people.

    Please help us hold this government responsible through your coverage of the event. Many could have been saved, if the Ma administration had moved faster and be more prepared. Even now, they are still doing little and have no idea what they should do.

    Please keep up the good work, and please keep on praying for Taiwan and all the survivors. There are still many people stranded and need all the help they can get.

    Thank you again.

    August 15, 2009 at 6:10 am |
  6. Sue Dailey

    80 inches of rain. I read Thursday they streached a cable across a ravine and saved 80 people. How could people survive and have the strength to hold on to a cable to be rescused?

    August 14, 2009 at 11:42 pm |
  7. Annie Kate

    Looks worse than some of our hurricanes that strike our mainland. Appreciate the links to places where we can help. The Impact your World section of the CNN site is one of your better ideas. Thank you for providing it.

    August 14, 2009 at 5:56 pm |