.
August 5th, 2009
04:06 PM ET

Democrats say Republicans staging town hall protests

The DNC released a Web ad charging the Republicans have 'called out the mob.'

The DNC released a Web ad charging the Republicans have 'called out the mob.'

CNN

Democrats are accusing Republicans of organizing "angry mobs" to disrupt town hall meetings across the country, but conservatives say the protests are a sign of the opposition to President Obama's health care plans.

The Democratic National Committee released a Web video Wednesday charging that Republican operatives "have no plan for moving our country forward, so they've called out the mob."

The video shows footage of angry constituents and protesters at recent events and then flashes pictures of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, House Minority Leader John Boehner, Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele, and even conservative talk radio icon Rush Limbaugh on the screen.

The ad says "desperate Republicans and their well-funded allies" are trying to "destroy President Obama."

Obama had originally asked Congress to send him health care legislation before the August recess, but lawmakers were unable to reach an agreement on a plan. The House of Representatives recessed last week, and the Senate heads home at the end of this week.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Health Care • President Barack Obama
August 5th, 2009
03:49 PM ET

Photo gallery: The scene of the crime immediately after the attack

Editor’s Note: Last Wednesday, gunmen shot up and burned the home of Mexican police commander José de Jesús Romero Vázquez. The officer, his wife and their four children were killed. The house in the Gulf Coast city of Veracruz was completely burned and its facade covered with bullet holes. Police said the youngest was a 6-year-old boy and the oldest was a 15-year-old girl. Take a look at these photos from the scene immediately after the torching. We’re looking into the drug wars this week and we’ll have more on the incident from Michael Ware tonight at 10 p.m. ET.

FULL POST

August 5th, 2009
03:36 PM ET
August 5th, 2009
03:02 PM ET

Bill Clinton shows that diplomacy works

Former President Bill Clinton and former Vice President Al Gore greets freed U.S. journalist Laura Ling.

Former President Bill Clinton and former Vice President Al Gore greets freed U.S. journalist Laura Ling.

Joseph Cirincione
Special to CNN

President Clinton did more than free two unjustly jailed journalists. He jump-started the successful diplomacy he had begun 15 years earlier.

In October 2000, then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright visited Pyongyang. During Bill Clinton's presidency, the administration had locked down North Korea's plutonium production program, which had created enough deadly material for two bombs during the Reagan years. They had stopped all missile tests. They were a few details away from concluding a deal to end these programs completely.

But Clinton ran out of time. Enmeshed in Middle East peace talks, Clinton could not get assurances that a presidential visit to North Korea would seal the deal. He passed off the almost completed process to the incoming George W. Bush administration.

On March 6, 2001, new Secretary of State Colin Powell said, "We do plan to engage with North Korea to pick up where President Clinton and his administration left off." But Bush had different ideas. On March 7, Bush kneecapped Powell.

With South Korean President Kim Dae-jung sitting next to him in embarrassed silence, Bush said, "We look forward to, at some point in the future, having a dialogue with the North Koreans, but any negotiation would require complete verification of the terms of a potential agreement."

Keep reading...


Filed under: Bill Clinton
August 5th, 2009
03:02 PM ET

Tonight: Text 360°

AC360°

Laura Ling and Euna Lee arrived back in the United States Wednesday morning with former President Bill Clinton, who flew to North Korea to negotiate their release after they were sentenced to a labor camp.

Clinton, 62, jumped back onto the world stage with the unannounced trip to Pyongyang. Pulling out the Clinton card was a big move. What kind of effect will it have on foreign policy? Will we be seeing more of the former president in this diplomatic role?

Tonight we'll be talking about Bill Clinton's role with our panel of experts. Do you have a question?

Let us know!

Send us a text message with your question. Text AC360 (or 22360), and you might hear it on air!


Filed under: T1 • Text 360
August 5th, 2009
02:55 PM ET

Excerpts from the shooter's diary

George Sodini wrote a diary before walking into an LA Fitness gym Tuesday near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

George Sodini wrote a diary before walking into an LA Fitness gym Tuesday near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Lateef Mungin
CNN

He felt lonely, said he hadn't had a girlfriend since 1984. He said his father didn't love him. And he detailed plans to kill young women.

George Sodini, the 48-year-old man police blame for killing three women and wounding 10 others in a suburban Pittsburgh gym, left behind an online diary that is as shocking in places as it is profane in others.

It offers a rare glimpse into the mind of a suspected killer who police say walked into an aerobics class, turned off the lights and fired more than 50 rounds from multiple handguns.

"Why do this?? To young girls? Just read below. I kept a running log that includes my thoughts and actions after I saw this project was going to drag on," the diary begins.

It seems almost formatted, like a résumé, with Sodini's date of birth and date of death. The date of death is listed as Tuesday, the day of the shootings at an LA Fitness outside Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

A law enforcement source who identified the shooter said Sodini was a member of the gym. The source provided a month and year of the suspect's birth that matches the month and year listed for Sodini in the online diary.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Crime & Punishment
August 5th, 2009
01:05 PM ET

Financial Dispatch: Jobs, jobs and (fewer) jobs…

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner says the stimulus plan is working, but tough choices may be ahead.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner says the stimulus plan is working, but tough choices may be ahead.

Andrew Torgan
CNN Financial News Producer

A tale of two job reports this morning… actually make it three reports.

Private-sector employment recorded its smallest monthly drop in nine months during July, but the number of job cuts announced in the month spiked 31%.

Payroll-processing firm ADP said private-sector employers cut 371,000 jobs in July - the smallest monthly total since last October.

Separately, outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas reported that the number of job cuts announced in July spiked 31% to more than 97,000, bouncing off a 15-month low in June.

July marked the first increase in monthly job cuts since January, and Challenger said the rate of job cuts will continue to increase for the rest of the year.

All this comes ahead of the government’s monthly employment report for July, which is due out on Friday. The consensus there is for a decline of about 330,000 jobs, while the unemployment rate is expected to tick up a tenth to 9.6%.

Service sector contracts

The service sector contracted in July at a faster pace than in June.

The Institute for Supply Management's services index fell to 46.4 last month from 47.0 in June, below economists' median forecast for a rise to 48.0. The dividing line between growth and contraction is 50.

The services sector represents about 80% of U.S. economic activity, including businesses such as banks, airlines, hotels and restaurants.

Factory orders rise

New orders received by factories climbed unexpectedly in June, advancing for a third straight month and raising hopes of an economic turnaround

The Commerce Dept. said factory orders climbed 0.4% in June after increasing by a revised 1.1% in May.

Excluding transportation items, factory orders surged 2.3% in June from May's 0.9% advance. And shipments of manufactured goods rebounded 1.4%, breaking 10 straight months of declines.

RadioShack to shake up image

RadioShack is hoping to revitalize its image with a marketing campaign that will dub its store “The Shack” in TV, print and online ads.

“The Shack” was chosen as the new name based on the fact that many consumers were already dropping "Radio" from the company's name when referring to one of its stores (or at least that’s what the company’s chief marketing officer said in a statement announcing the change).

Possible future ad slogans such as “I Love The Shack!” may result in lawsuits filed by both Shaquille O'Neal and The B-52s.

Follow the money… on Twitter: @AndrewTorganCNN


Filed under: Andrew Torgan • Economy • Finance
August 5th, 2009
01:01 PM ET

Bill Clinton shows diplomacy works

Joseph Cirincione
Special to CNN

President Clinton did more than free two unjustly jailed journalists. He jump-started the successful diplomacy he had begun 15 years earlier.

In October 2000, then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright visited Pyongyang. During Bill Clinton's presidency, the administration had locked down North Korea's plutonium production program, which had created enough deadly material for two bombs during the Reagan years. They had stopped all missile tests. They were a few details away from concluding a deal to end these programs completely.

But Clinton ran out of time. Enmeshed in Middle East peace talks, Clinton could not get assurances that a presidential visit to North Korea would seal the deal. He passed off the almost completed process to the incoming George W. Bush administration.

On March 6, 2001, new Secretary of State Colin Powell said, "We do plan to engage with North Korea to pick up where President Clinton and his administration left off." But Bush had different ideas. On March 7, Bush kneecapped Powell.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Bill Clinton • North Korea
August 5th, 2009
12:20 PM ET

The Buzz: Back at home in the US of A

Laura Ling, left, and Euna Lee step off a plane Wednesday morning at the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank.

Laura Ling, left, and Euna Lee step off a plane Wednesday morning at the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank.

Eliza Browning
AC360° Associate Producer

There was hardly a dry eye in the house when American journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee walked off the plane and were reunited with their families this morning in Los Angeles. Ling and Lee had been detained in North Korea since March and were sentenced to 12 years of hard labor. But North Korea pardoned the two American journalists after Bill Clinton traveled to Pyongyang to negotiate their release. There is a lot to this story and we’re continuing to learn more about who was involved in the negotiations and when the plan was put into place. We’ll have more about what went on behind-the-scenes tonight.

Clinton walked off the plane minutes after Ling and Lee but did not address the crowd. He later issued a statement saying he was happy the ordeal had ended. President Obama applauded their release and thanked the former President for doing “a great job.” Pulling out the Clinton card was a major move. What kind of foreign policy implications could result from his involvement? Tom Foreman will have more on Clinton’s role – and what it means for U.S. – NK relations and diplomatic policy in general.

FULL POST


Filed under: Eliza Browning • The Buzz
« older posts
newer posts »