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July 10th, 2009
10:07 PM ET

Photo Gallery: Choking on ash?

Program Note: Tune in tonight to learn more about the environmental disaster in Kingston, Tennessee. Dr. Sanjay Gupta went there to speak to residents of the region and to Erin Brockovich, who is advocating on behalf of the local community. More tonight at 10 p.m. ET.

soundoff (11 Responses)
  1. Katie

    I was curious as to what TVA has done to gain your appreciation? There are multiple ways they could have disposed of the coal and allocated it to be used for alternative resources. Have they relocated you to a new home, compensated you for the value of your property, relocation cost, and the time you have lost from work and family due to TVA'S accident? They are a multi billion dollar industry. Has TVA paid for you to be consulted by a medical expert of your choice, in pulmonary complications? Who may medically inform you and your family on some potential health ramifications of exposure to large amounts of ash inhaled in such a short time from burned coal ?

    July 13, 2009 at 8:56 am |
  2. Louisiana

    Hi Anderson & Erica:

    You know, we have a very high cancer rate
    near "Cancer Ally" near Baton Rouge.

    Could you all report on this death trap?

    Thank-you...

    July 13, 2009 at 5:02 am |
  3. Ed

    Considering that the head of the TVA was just given bonus money for doing a great job, I think he should give it back. One million dollar paychecks don't make for good management. Good management earns million dollar paychecks. Just another example of the tradegy caused by turing TVA over to a pseudo partnership.

    July 12, 2009 at 2:54 pm |
  4. Larry

    Now TVA has convinced the Alabama Department of Environmental Managment and the EPA to permit the transfer three million cubic yard of this toxic brew to the mostly Black Perry County, Alabama.

    The politically weak, uninformed, and poor continue to be exposed at a disproportionate rate to hazardous substances because their health is of no concern.

    July 12, 2009 at 2:16 pm |
  5. Donna Wood, Lil' Tennessee

    It looks like everyone was perhaps living on a kind of a shell and the shell gave way. Is that a fair summation?

    Donna Wood
    Lexington, Tennessee
    (West Tennessee)

    July 11, 2009 at 3:25 pm |
  6. Ruby

    Exactly GF, Los Angelos! Thats what I keep asking. Why aren't we hearing about this on the news? I suspect it has something to do with the fact that the Obama administration is promoting 'clean coal technology'.

    July 11, 2009 at 12:17 pm |
  7. dennis cook

    First of all, the disaster is horrific. I have no clue who Mr/Ms Happy is above but TVA has been hiding the truth, has been less than helpful, treated hundreds of residents unfairly, has done very little to deliver our community back to pre-coal ash disaster, has continued to deny the truth regarding the hundreds of acres and miles of rivers pollution with heavy metals, has denied claims, ruined our environment and destroyed our community.

    It appears the pripr post is either a plant or is someone who has rec'd pymt from tva.

    This disaster is very real and if one does a mere google search, one will find the real truth.

    It will take a lifetime to restore our waterways, if that is at all possible. Our landscape has changed, our air is likely to be contaminated, and it is a terrible disaster.

    Senator Boxer and Representative Bernice Johnson are both chairing committees in DC which are realizing how horrible this is.

    Do not be fooled, I live here, and am within 2 miles, cannot go in our river and the fish are contaminated.

    July 10, 2009 at 9:56 pm |
  8. Annie Kate

    The spill that caused this mess happened in December of last year. I would have thought TVA would have made more progress than what these pictures show and what the post by Erin Brockavich wrote. If the area is making the residents sick TVA should pay to let them stay somewhere else until their area is cleaned up. Its far easier to fix the mess on the ground than it is to fix the health problems the stuff causes.

    July 10, 2009 at 8:35 pm |
  9. Callie

    I lived 1/4 of a mile from where these images were photographed. To give you some context, Luke, yes, it is somewhat a combination of all of the things you mentioned. The TVA plant nearby burns coal to create electricity and the ash that results from this process was stored nearby. On top of these ash dikes was water, what we used to call the ash pond.

    On the night of the ash spill the crack in the foundation of the dike gave way and all the water and ash rushed forward. The force of the ash moved the house pictured off its foundation, and moved the owner's truck, boat, etc. across the road a good distance.

    As you will probably see if you tune into night, the area looks completely different now. It is by no means back to normal, but some of these images are not representative of how the area now looks.

    As a resident that was affected by this, I must say that my family has been treated well by TVA. They have done and continue to do what is necessary to make things right. They have our appreciation.

    July 10, 2009 at 8:01 pm |
  10. GF, Los Angeles

    I'm troubled by the fact this is a much larger disaster then the Exxon Valdez spill and this is the first I've heard of it. Where is the media coverage for this and what type of environmental impact will this have for years to come?

    July 10, 2009 at 7:29 pm |
  11. Luke

    I'm having trouble understanding the context of these images.

    Obviously, there is an environmental, and perhaps even human, crisis going on here. But on a very basic level what are these images showing? Is it the aftermath of a torrential downpour and the flooding/erosion left in its wake? Is it the accumulation of years of mining waste and its toll on the landscape and residents? Maybe all of the above?

    Perhaps some captioning would clarify what I'm seeing...or maybe I'll have to tune in for all the details (if so, a clever hook).

    Nevertheless, these are troubling images, to be sure.

    July 10, 2009 at 6:01 pm |