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August 7th, 2008
03:21 PM ET

Sending out the message from AIDS summit

A protester stands at the opening ceremony of the XVII International AIDS conference in Mexico City

A protester stands at the opening ceremony of the XVII International AIDS conference in Mexico City

Harris Whitbeck
CNN Correspondent

MEXICO CITY, Mexico
Twenty-two thousand people from all over the world, gathered in one conference center for a week. All of them have different takes on the AIDS epidemic, and all of them are keen on making their points of view known.

It’s like being a kid in a candy store for a journalist. All these people, all eager to talk to you, all vying for your attention as a representative of the global media.

But that’s what makes covering an AIDS conference so difficult: How do you sort through all the information, all the public relations pitches, all of the staged events to get to the story?

Keep reading


Filed under: AIDS • Harris Whitbeck
soundoff (4 Responses)
  1. Ashley

    We have to find a cure,this virus/disease is alreday a giant epidemic.We need more funding for research.

    August 7, 2008 at 8:06 pm |
  2. Chicago

    I think AIDS lost a lot of the public outcry because it's preventable.
    If you take certain steps you can't contract HIV... (this only happening after more public education and testing of blood, etc) I think a lot can be done in third world countries especially in the education department.

    I hope that a cure is found... or at least a vaccine... But some people will never consider it a threat because their lifestyle prevents them from getting it... sadly,,, some even see it as the fault of the victim.

    August 7, 2008 at 6:45 pm |
  3. Tammy, Berwick, LA

    Prevention specialists, scientists, doctors. other health workers, counselors, survivors (those still living with the disease and those who've survived a loss of someone they love to the disease) all have at base the same message I think. That message is the people this disease impacts matter too much for this to ever be ignored. Those who have died matter too much for this to ever be ignored. All voices should be heard. No one should ever forget. No one should ever stop trying to stop this thing until we have done that. Fifteen years ago I promised my best friend I would never allow him to be forgotten when he died of AIDS complications and would never stop working to stop this disease. I think a lot of us made those promises we all try to keep. Telling the stories in the media simply helps us honor them and share the message of prevention and awareness with the world. Thank you.

    August 7, 2008 at 5:14 pm |
  4. sally

    –canada has come out strongly against providing heroin and
    other injected drugs to person accessing the clean needle
    sites.
    –canada contributre to who for clean needsl, counseilling
    etc. - everythoing except actually supplying the actural drugs
    ..drugs that are against the law.
    perhaps this is something that cnn should report on as well.
    there is a great difference between providing help to users
    and providing free drugs to contribute to more crime etc.
    sally.
    ps most canadainas watch cnn

    August 7, 2008 at 4:21 pm |