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October 14th, 2008
10:26 AM ET

"Drill Baby Drill" – A whale of a problem

Editor’s note: CNN’s award-winning Planet in Peril returns this year to examine the conflict between growing populations and natural resources. Anderson Cooper, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, and Lisa Ling travel to the front lines of this worldwide battle. Ling has been a co-host of The View, correspondent for The Oprah Winfrey Show, National Geographic and Channel One. She filed this blog from Alaska

Lisa Ling
AC360° Special Correspondent

Arrived in Anchorage, Alaska yesterday. The burning question I had for everyone I encountered was what people really thought of Governor Palin. But since that question is not germane to the reason why I’m here, I shall refrain from writing about what those conversations entailed.

Almost immediately upon arrival, we set off to interview the General Manager of Shell operations in Alaska. He stressed the vital importance of drilling off shore in the Alaskan Arctic, as it is potentially a source that could reduce our reliance upon foreign oil. When I asked him if the result would be a temporary one, he said, “ we can’t know until we’re actually allowed to drill.”

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Filed under: Lisa Ling • Planet in Peril
September 17th, 2008
11:31 AM ET

Shark population threatened near Costa Rica

Lisa Ling
AC360° Special Correspondent

Shark Finning

Planet in Peril: Battle Lines special correspondent Lisa Ling travels to Cocos Islands, located about 330 miles off the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, to investigate the threat to the shark population brought on by the demand for shark fin soup.


Filed under: Lisa Ling • Planet in Peril • T1
July 7th, 2008
11:32 AM ET

Shark fin soup is tasty...but so is a twinkee

Lisa Ling
AC360° Special Correspondent

On our last night in Taiwan, we visited a restaurant that proudly serves Shark Fin Soup. A couple from Japan came specifically because they had seen an ad for it in a popular Japanese magazine. It was a Thursday night and the restaurant was full—every table ordered it. What was once only consumed on special occasions for wealthy people has become so commonplace that we saw shark fin products in a gas station mini-mart.

It seems the best way to save the world's shark population will be to educate people about how shark fin soup is made. I know that I was totally shocked when I learned of the process and what happens to so many sharks as a result of our desire to consume this insignificant soup. Sure, it's tasty, but so is a twinkee.


Filed under: Lisa Ling • Planet in Peril
July 4th, 2008
05:43 PM ET

A taste for soup – a bite out of a population

Editor’s note: CNN’s award-winning Planet in Peril returns this year to examine the conflict between growing populations and natural resources. Anderson Cooper, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, and Lisa Ling travel to the front lines of this worldwide battle. Ling has been a co-host of The View, correspondent for The Oprah Winfrey Show, National Geographic and Channel One. She filed this blog from Taiwan on how shark-finning operations that have helped deplete the oceans of more than 90 percent of shark species.

Lisa Ling
AC360° Special Correspondent

This experience has been quite an education for me. I, frankly, have been terrified of sharks all of my life. That's because pop culture and sensational news reporting have perpetuated the notion that sharks are the fiercest attackers of humans in the animal world. I was surprised to learn that this is to the contrary. Worldwide sharks kill an average of 10 people every year. According to WildAid, humans kill up to 70 million sharks over the course of a given year. Who's the bigger killer?

Because of films like "Jaws," humans have been conditioned to fear sharks. They are considered to be the most maligned animals in the world. Sharks predate dinosaurs and have roamed the oceans for 400 million years.

They are the ocean's top predator and essential for the ocean's ecosystem.

FULL POST


Filed under: Lisa Ling • Planet in Peril
July 2nd, 2008
11:37 AM ET

Shark Fin Soup – altering an ecosystem

Editor’s note: CNN’s award-winning Planet in Peril returns this year to examine the conflict between growing populations and natural resources. Anderson Cooper, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, and Lisa Ling travel to the front lines of this worldwide battle. Ling has been a co-host of The View, correspondent for The Oprah Winfrey Show, National Geographic and Channel One. She filed this blog from Taiwan on how shark-finning operations that have helped deplete the oceans of more than 90 percent of shark species.

Lisa Ling
AC360° special correspondent

Arrived in Taipei after flying 13 hours from LA. After looking for lost luggage and equipment–which is standard these days–we hopped into a car for a 4-hour drive to the south.

I have spent a fair amount of time in Taiwan as my mother is from here. It's one of my favorite countries to visit primarily because the food is so excitingly exotic and delicious.

The irony is that we are here to report on the impact that the overfishing of sharks is having on the overall shark population and how it's affecting the ocean's ecosystem. Shark meat and shark skin are used for food and textiles, but the most desirable part of a shark is its fins. Shark Fin Soup is one of the great delicacies in Asia–particularly China. It symbolizes wealth and prosperity. One is not considered a good host if he/she omits Shark Fin Soup from a celebratory dinner.

FULL POST


Filed under: Lisa Ling • Planet in Peril • T1
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