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June 19th, 2013
10:35 PM ET

Documentary: TWA 800 crash no accident

A documentary on the 1996 explosion that brought down TWA Flight 800 offers "solid proof that there was an external detonation," its co-producer said Wednesday.

"Of course, everyone knows about the eyewitness statements, but we also have corroborating information from the radar data, and the radar data shows a(n) asymmetric explosion coming out of that plane - something that didn't happen in the official theory," Tom Stalcup told CNN's New Day.

Read more...

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Filed under: Airline Safety
June 19th, 2013
10:33 PM ET

FBI's TWA 800 investigator denies cover-up

Former FBI Assistant Director James Kallstrom calls a documentary suggesting missiles shot down TWA Flight 800 "preposterous."

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled the 1996 explosion was caused by an electrical short circuit, but former investigators want the investigation reopened because they assert evidence proves an outside force caused the crash. Kallstrom says agents took the missile theory seriously when they examined the wreckage and circumstances.

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Filed under: Airline Safety
June 19th, 2013
10:30 PM ET

Investigator: Lies told about plane crash

Former Senior National Transportation Safety Board Investigator Hank Hughes says physical evidence shows an outside explosion brought down TWA flight 800 in 1996, and it was not an accident.

All 230 passengers aboard the plane heading to Paris died when it exploded and fell apart soon after taking off from John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The NTSB ruled that the incident was caused by an electrical short circuit, but now former investigators are requesting the investigation be reopened.

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Filed under: Airline Safety
March 26th, 2013
10:04 PM ET

Electronics on airplanes

The FAA is rethinking the ban on some electronics during takeoff and landing. PBS' science correspondent, Miles O'Brien, explains why.

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Filed under: Airline Safety
March 9th, 2013
11:00 PM ET

Opposition to new TSA knives policy

Delta Air Lines' CEO said tonight he objects to the federal Transportation Security Administration's move to allow small pocketknives on airplanes.

Anderson spoke to CBS News' John Miller and Intl. President of the Association of Flight Attendants Veda Shook about the proposed changes.

Veda Shook says we're safer without knives on planes and easing restrictions will create airport checkpoint bottlenecks.

Read more about the new TSA rules


Filed under: Airline Safety • TSA
April 16th, 2010
04:04 PM ET

Update: How the volcanic ash is affecting air travel


The volcanic ash has created traffic delays from Denmark to France, above.

CNN Wire Staff

Here are the latest highlights regarding problems for air travel caused by the volcanic eruption in Iceland:

1:35 p.m.

• According to the Air Transport Association of America, U.S. carriers have canceled 196 flights so far on Friday between the United States and volcano-affected areas in Europe.

• British Airways is flying a number of flights from North America to Scotland overnight.

• Ryanair has decided to cancel all scheduled flights to and from the United Kingdom, Ireland, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Holland, northern France, northern Germany, Poland and the Baltic states into Monday.

• IATA's initial and conservative estimate of the financial impact on airlines is in excess of $200 million per day in lost revenues. The group is an international trade body created more than 60 years ago by a group of airlines.

• The Swedish airspace authority LFV said almost all Swedish airspace will close again. Only the country's two most northern airports, Lulea and Kiruna, will be able to have limited air traffic, and these restrictions will most likely remain in place throughout the weekend, LFV said.

Keep reading...


Filed under: 360° Radar • Airline Safety
April 16th, 2010
02:06 PM ET

Experts: No end to volcano ash in sight

CNN

Weather experts predicted Friday that a volcanic ash causing chaos to air traffic across Europe would affect the region well into the weekend and possibly beyond as the dust cloud continued to spread.

Scientists said it was too soon to predict when the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland would cease spewing ash, raising the prospect of thousands more grounded flights in coming days.

Prevailing westerly winds are expected to fan the massive plume of dust from an erupting volcano in Iceland further east and north, according to predictions from the London Ash Advisory Center.

By 07:00 GMT Saturday (7 p.m. ET) the cloud traveling at up to 9,000 meters (30,000 feet) is forecast to be covering parts of Russia, Poland, Finland and other East European countries while continuing to affect the UK, Sweden, Norway, Germany, Denmark and Netherlands.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Airline Safety
April 16th, 2010
11:17 AM ET

Video: Volcanic ash still causing travel chaos

CNN Wire Staff

Volcanic ash from Iceland severely disrupted air traffic across Europe for a second day on Friday, causing the cancellation of some 17,000 flights, according to the intergovernmental body that manages European air travel.

Eurocontrol said it expected around 11,000 flights to take place Friday, in contrast to the normal 28,000. The impact will last at least another 24 hours, Eurocontrol said Friday morning.

The ash has spread to large parts of northern Europe and has forced the closure of some of Europe's busiest airports, causing more disruption to worldwide air travel than 9/11.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Airline Safety
April 16th, 2010
11:14 AM ET

Video: Weather is factor in how ash cloud acts, experts say

Craig Johnson
Special to CNN

As a volcanic ash cloud hung over parts of Europe on Thursday, weather experts said air travel in the region, and increasingly the world, will be affected by how the wind blows.

With no major storm system on the horizon, the weather –specifically the wind - in Europe could play a significant role in how the cloud acts, CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller said.

The ash cloud, swept in from a volcanic eruption in Iceland, has affected thousands of flights and closed some of Europe's busiest airports.

Keep reading...

http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/weather/04/15/volcano.weather/index.html?hpt=T1


Filed under: 360° Radar • Airline Safety
April 15th, 2010
03:07 PM ET

U.S. airlines cancel Europe flights

The closure of United Kingdom airspace prompted the cancellation of numerous flights.
The closure of United Kingdom airspace prompted the cancellation of numerous flights.

Marnie Hunter
CNN

Americans flying to Europe on Thursday are in for some bumps in their itineraries as clouds of volcanic ash from Iceland close airspace in parts of Europe.

The United Kingdom's airspace was closed about noon Thursday (7 a.m. ET) and will be closed until at least 7 a.m. (2 a.m. ET) Friday, air traffic authorities said. Delta Air Lines has suspended service into and out of the UK for the rest of Thursday, spokesman Anthony Black said.

"At this point, it's only the UK (other flights have departed/arrived for the day). We will automatically rebook any cancelled flights. We are waiting to hear additional info from European air traffic controllers before we make any other adjustments," Black said in an e-mail.

Keep reading...

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