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March 18th, 2014
10:16 PM ET

Sarah Bajc: Please don't hurt the people on the plane

Sarah Bajc was preparing to move to Malaysia with her partner Philip Wood. He is one of the Americans on board Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. They have been together two years and had plans to get married this year. Now she tells Anderson "miracles do happen, they happen everyday."

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
March 18th, 2014
10:13 PM ET

Flight 370: Analyzing the facts and breaking down theories

In the 11 days since Flight 370 vanished, only a handful of clues have surfaced. Without much for investigators to go on, they have not been able to rule out any of the theories on the table. Anderson looked at all of this with CNN aviation analysts Les Abend and Jim Tilmon along with aviation analyst for ABC News John Nance.

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Filed under: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
March 18th, 2014
09:53 PM ET

AC360 Exclusive: Inside ACARS

Since Flight 370 disappeared there has been plenty of talk about the plane's ACARS system. That's one of the two communications systems that stopped broadcasting before the plane lost contact. To the untrained eye, ACARS may look like a a bunch of computers and wires. But how hard is it to turn off? Anderson got a closer look with Jim Sciutto and former NTSB member and aircraft mechanic John Goglia.

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Filed under: Exclusive • Jim Sciutto • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
March 18th, 2014
09:49 PM ET

Recreating Flight 370's sharp left turn

Both Thai and Malaysian officials report their radar systems registered a plane that may have been Flight 370. If that's true, it would indicate the flight took a hard left from its intended route. A law enforcement official says a move like that was almost certainly programmed by someone in the cockpit. Martin Savidge took a closer look in a 777 flight simulator with flight instructor Mitchell Casado.

March 18th, 2014
09:41 PM ET

New indication of Flight 370's possible flight path

Thailand's military says their radar tracked an unidentified aircraft flying west. That backs up earlier reports from Malaysia that the plane took a hard left turn. Officials say a maneuver like that would likely require someone in the cockpit to alter the 777's flight computers. Kyung Lah is in Kuala Lampur with the latest.

Anderson discussed all of this with The New York Times' Michael Schmidt, former U.S. Department of Transportation Inspector General Mary Schiavo, and 777 Captain Les Abend.