AC360 Thursday 8p

There are growing questions about the Bluefin-21 search for Flight 370. What's happens when it completes its sweep? The latest tonight on AC360.
May 21st, 2013
05:54 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Catastrophe in Oklahoma

A day after a twister 1.3 miles wide ravaged the city of Moore, Oklahoma, the scope of the damage is evident. At least 24 people died, including nine children. Some of the youngest victims who lost their lives were in Plaza Towers Elementary School, which collapsed in the storm.

The estimated peak wind was about 200 mph, which would put the tornado in the most powerful category, an EF5, according to the National Weather Service. Today more than 40,000 customers are still without power, a utility spokesman said

This afternoon Anderson Cooper was standing in front of twisted metal and layers of debris. The bowling alley would have been completely unrecognizable except for the bowling balls scattered in the wreckage. That scene is replicated throughout the town – pile after pile of crumbled buildings and homes.

As residents face tremendous loss and suffering, heroes have risen to the occasion. Anderson will talk with a teacher who protected her students, and he'll interview eyewitnesses who survived the wrath of the storms. He'll also ask Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin and Moore Mayor Glenn Lewis about the status of recovery operations. Anderson, Gary Tuchman and our team of reporters are live on the scene at 8 and 10 p.m. ET.

TO HELP, DONATE TO THE AMERICAN RED CROSS
http://www.redcross.org or text REDCROSS to 90999
1-800-REDCROSS

AND VISIT CNN.COM/IMPACT

Check out photos taken by our producers and photojournalists covering the aftermath in Oklahoma:

Moore, Oklahoma. Photo credit: Anderson Cooper

Moore, Oklahoma. Photo credit: Anderson Cooper

Moore, Oklahoma. Credit: Neil Hallsworth

Moore, Oklahoma. Credit: Neil Hallsworth

Moore, Oklahoma. Photo credit: Susan Chun

Moore, Oklahoma. Photo credit: Susan Chun

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Filed under: Tornadoes • Weather
soundoff (One Response)
  1. T Levy

    With tornados such a constant issue why are safe room not required in each house in these areas unless they already have a basement. I heard yesterday that digging a basement is very hard an expensive in Oklahoma so why not require a safe room made from concreate so even if the whole house is taken, the room will stay with the slab.

    May 21, 2013 at 7:27 pm |