AC360 Monday 8p

There are growing questions about the ferry crew's actions. The latest on the South Korean ferry disaster live on AC360.
October 30th, 2012
11:40 PM ET

Stranded drivers rescued in New Jersey

CNN's Gary Tuchman reports from Hoboken, New Jersey, where thousands are trapped in their homes due to flooding. In parts of the city the water is four or five ft. deep, and there are live power lines that could be deadly. Gary was with the mayor and a police office when they saw two people trying to drive, then push their car through the flooded streets. The officer got in the water and picked up both the man and the woman and lifted them into a dump truck, with assistance from Gary and Mayor Dawn Zimmer.

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy • Weather
October 30th, 2012
06:59 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Superstorm Sandy

Anderson Cooper reports live at 8 and 10 p.m. ET on the devastating impact of the deadly storm. Millions are still without power and search and rescue operations continue. Tonight, details from Anderson and our correspondents across the Northeast.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION ON THE LIVE BLOG.


Filed under: 360° Radar • Hurricane Sandy
Tonight on AC360: Sandy's wrath
October 30th, 2012
05:02 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Sandy's wrath

The worst of the storm may have passed in certain parts of the Northeast, but Sandy is not over. Residents are still experiencing intense and sometimes dire situations. Today police and other emergency personnel continue rescue operations, fight fires and pump water out of flood areas.

Nearly 8 million customers are without power in 15 states and the District of Columbia, according to figures compiled by CNN from local power companies. In the U.S., 30 people have died from the extreme conditions. The total death toll, including Canada, Haiti, and the Caribbean is 98.

FULL POST


Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
October 30th, 2012
02:45 PM ET

Letters to the President #1380: 'After the storm'

Reporter's Note: President Obama and Mitt Romney remain focused on the storm that swept through the Northeast, as do I.

Dear Mr. President,

As I read up on the damage from the big storm, I could not help but find myself focusing on the stark contrast between the good and bad news. This was an absolutely massive storm slamming into one of the most populated geographic regions in the world. The potential for unbelievable loss of lives and homes was very real. Tragically, some people did lose their lives, and more lost their houses.

So what is the good news? This truly is a case in which it could have been much, much, much worse. Ask the people of New Orleans. Or the Gulf Coast. Or Joplin, Missouri. In terms of the direct, human cost of this storm, the whole area came out remarkably well. Maybe that is because leaders and the media did a good warning people to get ready. Maybe it’s because the storm behaved a little differently than we expected. Maybe we were just lucky. No matter the cause, we can all be thankful for all the lives and homes that made it through with little or no damage.

But then there is the other part of the equation which is demonstrably bad. The impact on the infrastructure and economy of the region is profound and could last for a substantial amount of time. The Northeast is a massive economic engine that drives employment for millions of people within its area and far beyond. Losing railroad lines, electricity, subways, airports, roads, and days of commerce in that critical part of the country will cost many billions of dollars…real money that will not be recovered. Towns will lose businesses as a result of this storm. Surviving businesses will lose income. And people will lose jobs.

The people who lost friends or family will never be the same, of course, and we can only mourn with them. Those who lost their homes will also be forever changed by the experience, and will largely have to chart their own private ways forward. But the rest of it…the long slow struggle to rebuild what was lost and restore fully the communities that were stricken…that is something with which we might all be able to assist. And judging from what I’ve already seen, there are plenty of Americans who will be happy to help.

Call if you can.

Regards,
Tom

October 30th, 2012
12:22 PM ET

Mayor addresses governor's criticism

Atlantic City Mayor Lorenzo Langford says New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is misinformed about evacuations in his city. He tells Anderson Cooper he's focusing on helping the people in his city.

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy
October 30th, 2012
12:05 PM ET

Mayor: Hoboken filling up like a bathtub

On Monday, Mayor Dawn Zimmer tells Anderson Cooper about the biggest threats in Hoboken, New Jersey, after flooding from Sandy.

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Filed under: Hurricane Sandy