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June 21st, 2012
11:48 PM ET

How re-enactment video affects Zimmerman

Mark Geragos says video of George Zimmerman re-enacting the Trayvon Martin shooting helps his defense. Sunny Hostin thinks it could aid the prosecution

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Filed under: Crime & Punishment • Trayvon Martin
June 21st, 2012
11:46 PM ET

Grandma bullied on school bus

Video taken on a cell phone shows 68-year-old school bus monitor Karen Klein tormented by middle school students. She says she's never experienced anything like it. CNN's Randi Kaye reports.

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Filed under: Bullying
June 21st, 2012
11:20 PM ET

George Zimmerman re-enacts Trayvon Martin shooting

In a newly released video made the day after the shooting, George Zimmerman walks police through the deadly confrontation with Trayvon Martin.

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Filed under: Crime & Punishment • Trayvon Martin
June 21st, 2012
11:16 PM ET

Bus monitor Karen Klein opens up about kid bullies

School bus monitor Karen Klein tells Anderson Cooper what she hopes happens to the boys who harassed and threatened her.

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Filed under: 360° Interview • Bullying
June 21st, 2012
11:02 PM ET

Sandusky's adopted son claims sex abuse

Mark Geragos calls the timing of Matt Sandusky's announcement, that Jerry Sandusky molested him, 'incredibly suspicious.' Sunny Hostin disagrees.

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Filed under: Jerry Sandusky
June 21st, 2012
01:54 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Bullied bus monitor speaks out

In a cringe-inducing cell phone video, 68-year-old Karen Klein is bullied relentlessly by middle school students. Klein is bombarded with profane language, insults, threats and cruel taunts. The students repeatedly call the mother of four and grandmother of eight ugly, a troll, smelly and worse.

Klein is just trying to do her job; she's the bus monitor for students in Greece, New York. In the video you can see she's surrounded by the kids leaning out of their seats to harass her, and even touch her while calling her fat.

At one point, she tries to ignore them and look the other way when one of the boys jabs the backside of her arm with his finger and then a book, prompting the others to comment on her "jiggle" and "flab."

FULL POST

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Filed under: 360° Radar • Bullying
The AC360 Weekly Buzz: Fast and Furious, Egypt elections, Mubarak, Clemens, immigration, Sandusky, Holder, Karen Klein
June 21st, 2012
12:55 PM ET

The AC360 Weekly Buzz: Fast and Furious, Egypt elections, Mubarak, Clemens, immigration, Sandusky, Holder, Karen Klein

What everyone’s talking about:

Results from Egypt’s presidential elections were supposed to be announced today, but have been delayed. Meanwhile, conflicting reports about ex-Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak’s health surfaced on Tuesday. Mubarakwas sentenced to life in prison earlier this month. A state news agency reported that the 84-year-old suffered a stroke and was “clinically dead.” However, Mubarak’s lawyer said he was in a coma and the military said he was in critical condition. On Wednesday, he was removed from life-support equipment, his attorney said. But many don’t believe Mubarak’s health should be a concern with the country struggling to create a new political identity. Stanford University’s Fouad Ajami says Mubarak is just playing a game to move out of prison and into a hospital.

There are allegations of a child sex abuse cover-up in ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn, New York. The District Attorney is accused by some of being part of the problem. He says he’s done nothing wrong. CNN’s Gary Tuchman has the story.

FULL POST

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Filed under: AC360° Weekly Buzz
June 21st, 2012
09:36 AM ET

Letters to the President #1249: 'Rule four: Admit it'

Reporter's Note: President Obama is running for re-election. This week I’m writing my favorite guidelines for any politician who wants to win.

Dear Mr. President,

Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone. Paupers and Presidents alike.

Rule four: Admit it.

This is a tough one, I know. I’ve never met a single U.S. President who seems to readily admit when he was wrong, no matter how many years we are past the issue under discussion. To a soul, I’ve heard them vigorously defend every decision, no matter how disastrously it turned out. Oh, I’m sure there must be some exceptions but I can’t remember any at the moment.

The strange thing is I believe the greatest leaders are always those who most readily admit when they have made a mistake.

Admitting you’ve done something wrong may be seen as weakness in D.C., but I have always known it to be a sign of genuine strength. Who doesn’t admit his failings? A person who is afraid. A person who lacks the courage to face the facts. A person who is deceiving himself, and therefore is likely to deceive you as well.

Sure, there is risk involved. Your followers may lose faith. You may be ridiculed. In the rough and tumble world of politics, admitting a mistake can have dire consequences. But I think Presidents should ask themselves a basic question. Do you want to be just a president, or a great leader? There truly is a difference. And great leaders achieve that goal not by always being right, but instead by admitting when they are wrong…so they can get onto the right path again.

More tomorrow.

Regards,
Tom