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March 2nd, 2012
10:52 PM ET

Video: Reporter: We saw homes ripped apart

WDRB reporter Lawrence Smith describes what it was like being trapped in a tornado that hit Henryville, Indiana.

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Filed under: Tornadoes • Weather
March 2nd, 2012
10:50 PM ET

Video: Limbaugh comments spark controversy

Anderson Cooper asks political analysts to weigh in on the presidential candidates' response to Rush Limbaugh's recent comments about Georgetown Law student Sandra Fluke. The radio talk show host called her a 'slut' and a 'prostitute' after she testified before a congressional panel advocating for health insurance to cover contraceptives.


Filed under: Raw Politics
March 2nd, 2012
10:40 PM ET

Video: Dad and daughter reunite after tornado

A father and daughter in Indiana find each other after the storm. He says he's in shock from seeing his community destroyed.


Filed under: Tornadoes • Weather
March 2nd, 2012
10:35 PM ET

Video: Conroy on Syria: 'It's a slaughterhouse'

Paul Conroy, a British photojournalist who was recently smuggled out of Syria, spoke with Anderson by phone earlier tonight. He was injured in the same shelling that killed his friends and colleagues Marie Colvin and Remi Ochlik. "This was murder" Conroy told us, "professional artillerymen targeted and murdered Marie Colvin. They murdered Remi." Conroy, who has covered wars and conflicts all over the world says what he's witnessed in Syria is a systematic slaughter of civilians by the regime. He calls this the most ferocious and unnecessary violence he's seen, and that the world has stood by and watched this assault continue while doing nothing. Although Conroy just escaped Syria, he says he would go back to confront Assad. "I would go face to face with anyone in the Syrian regime and refute their lies," Conroy told us.

 

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Filed under: Syria
March 2nd, 2012
10:22 PM ET

Video: RidicuList: Airlines add Facebook 'social seating'

Two airlines have decided to let passengers choose who they want to be seated next to based on their Facebook profiles. Anderson chooses to add this to the RidicuList.

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Filed under: The RidicuList
March 2nd, 2012
10:15 PM ET

Video: Children trapped in school after tornado

Storm chaser Jeff Piotrowski says the severe damage in Indiana left people trapped in buildings and under houses.


Filed under: Tornadoes • Weather
March 2nd, 2012
07:19 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Journalist: 'Medieval siege' in Syria

Paul Conroy, a veteran war photojournalist, describes the "vicious" attacks on civilians by government forces in Syria. Watch the full interview tonight on AC360 at 8 and 10 p.m. ET.

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Filed under: Syria
March 2nd, 2012
07:13 PM ET

Tonight on AC360: Conroy: Marie Colvin targeted, murdered

Photojournalist Paul Conroy was with Marie Colvin when she was killed in Syria. He says the government murdered her. Watch the full interview tonight on AC360 at 8 and 10 p.m. ET.

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Filed under: Syria
March 2nd, 2012
06:15 PM ET

Letters to the President #1138: 'Tornadoes'

Reporter's Note: Once again I have written to the president. The sun rose. I wrote. He did not respond. Same formula every day.

Dear Mr. President,

It was so awful to contemplate all those tornadoes ripping across the country this week. I’ve been close to a good many tornadoes over the years; near enough to have some idea of how the sky howls, houses shake, the air alternates between being sticky hot and shivering cold, and it feels as if any moment the wind will close around you like a hand and pull you away from earth.

Here is the thing, however: Most of the time that I’ve been near such things, it has been because that’s my job; I choose to be there. It is a totally different matter when you are simply living in some town that you love, going about the life you lead, and a monster storm drops upon your world with no warning.

I don’t have to go on about how horrific the results can be. The loss of lives is, of course, devastating, but even where no one dies the loss of possessions and security can leave people frightened and uneasy for a lifetime whenever the sky darkens.

There is little to do about it in the short run. We can continue to work on storm resistant homes, and better forecasting models. And we should. But these storms are so powerful and sudden, no matter what we do, they will still visit hell upon our fellow citizens from time to time. So I think our focus probably needs to be more on constantly improving the response, which has thankfully grown much better over the years, but can improve still.

People will still crouch in fear as the storms roar overhead, but perhaps it will help them feel a little more secure, if we can steadily make it more and more clear that we will all stand together to rebuild when the skies clear.

My thoughts are with all those communities under the storms now, as I am sure are yours.

Regards,
Tom