AC360 Monday 8p

There are growing questions about the ferry crew's actions. The latest on the South Korean ferry disaster live on AC360.
January 13th, 2011
09:53 PM ET

Arizona's Suspected Gunman: Missed Red Flags? - Join the Live Chat

Tonight on 360°, the missed opportunities that might have prevented a massacre. Arizona makes it very easy to compel someone to get a mental health evaluation. Yet the campus police chief at the community college Jared Loughner attended and was suspended from for bizarre and allegedly threatening behavior did not seem to know that. Plus, exclusive details on Rep. Giffords condition. Dr. Sanjay Gupta talked with her husband and doctors.

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
January 13th, 2011
06:46 PM ET

Beat 360° 1/13/11

Ready for today's Beat 360°? Everyday we post a picture you provide the caption and our staff will join in too. Tune in tonight at 10pm to see if you are our favorite! Here is the 'Beat 360°' pic:

Kim Clijsters of Belgium throws her racket in her match against Alisa Kleybanova of Russia during day five of the 2011 Medibank International at Sydney Olympic Park Tennis Centre on January 13, 2011 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo credit: Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Have fun with it. We're looking forward to your captions! Make sure to include your name, city, state (or country) so we can post your comment.

Update: Beat 360° Winners:

Staff
Devna Shukla
“'Wingardium Leviosa': Kim Clijsters has nothin’ on Harry Potter!"


Viewer

Amber
“"Ms. Clijsters demonstrates her impressive skills with the Force: ‘Do or do not; there is no try.’”

___________________________________________________________________________Beat 360° Challenge


Filed under: Beat 360° • T1
January 13th, 2011
06:00 PM ET

Margaret Cho: HIV/AIDS still carries stigma

Katie McLaughlin
CNN

(CNN) - For Margaret Cho, HIV/AIDS isn’t something to think about once a year around the start of December – it’s a personal cause.

The comedian recently spoke with CNN about what inspired her to get involved with HIV/AIDS activism as "Anderson Cooper 360°" gears up to mark the 30th anniversary of the first AIDS diagnosis with a special presentation, "Hope Survives: 30 Years of AIDS." The hour-long special, which airs Friday at 9 p.m. ET on CNN, will also feature guests Sir Elton John, Sharon Stone, Mo'Nique and Cho, among others.

We caught up with Cho to talk about where the issue of HIV/AIDS stands today as well as if she’s spoken to one Bristol Palin lately.

CNN: Why is this issue so important to you, personally?

Cho: It's an issue that I, unfortunately, grew up around. HIV/AIDS was a really big problem right when I was a kid growing up in the ‘80s in San Francisco. There were so many people who were dying of AIDS and it was such a huge, huge, terrible issue in our community and then, of course, it was a global issue as well.

It made me realize that issues of health can be very political, and so that’s really where I began my political journey as a young AIDS activist trying to raise money and trying to find a way out of the problem.

CNN: What are some of the stigmas surrounding HIV/AIDS that bother you the most?

Cho: I think that because the disease affected mostly gay people, there was a stigma attached that there was something wrong with people who had it – that the homophobia that surrounded the disease made people more hesitant to want to find a cure.

Or, that there was something wrong with having [HIV/AIDS], and that people who had it often were dying needlessly because they were either not aware of it, they didn't want to be aware of it, they didn't want to be associated with it and that’s why they didn’t seek treatment, or they weren’t getting help from their families because they somehow felt that they deserved the illness. There was so much made about the way that people contracted the disease and judgment being placed on that which was really terrible.

Full story on the Marquee blog

Editor's note:
Greater Than AIDS – a new national movement to respond to AIDS in America– is asking Americans to share their “Deciding Moments," personal experiences that changed how they think about the disease and inspired them to get involved. For many it is someone close to them who was infected. For some it was their own diagnosis. For others it was a realization that we all have a role to play. Tell us about your “Deciding Moment” by visiting: www.greaterthan.org/moment.

Related: Visit Greater Than AIDS for answers to frequently asked questions about HIV/AIDS, as well as information about local testing centers.


Filed under: 360° Radar • AIDS • Katie McLaughlin
January 13th, 2011
05:15 PM ET

iReport Assignment: 30th anniversary of AIDS epidemic

Watch an AC360° special 'Hope Survives: 30 Years of AIDS' Friday beginning at 9pm ET.
Watch an AC360° special 'Hope Survives: 30 Years of AIDS' Friday beginning at 9pm ET.

iReport.com
CNN

2011 marks 30 years since the AIDS epidemic began, and is an important time of remembrance for those whose lives have been affected by the disease.

Has AIDS and HIV touched your life or that of someone you know? Have you been inspired to take action in some way? We're putting together a story for CNN.com, and we want to include your voice.

Click here to go to CNN's iReport.com to share your story

Editor's note: Tune in to "Hope Survives: 30 Years of AIDS," an AC360° beginning 9pm ET Friday.
Greater Than AIDS – a new national movement to respond to AIDS in America– is asking Americans to share their “Deciding Moments," personal experiences that changed how they think about the disease and inspired them to get involved. For many it is someone close to them who was infected. For some it was their own diagnosis. For others it was a realization that we all have a role to play. Tell us about your “Deciding Moment” by visiting: www.greaterthan.org/moment.

Related: Visit Greater Than AIDS for answers to frequently asked questions about HIV/AIDS, as well as information about local testing centers.


Filed under: 360° Radar • AIDS • iReport
January 13th, 2011
04:45 PM ET

Chefs with Issues – Suvir Saran on HIV/AIDS activism

New Delhi-born Suvir Saran is the executive chef of Dévi restaurant in New York City.
New Delhi-born Suvir Saran is the executive chef of Dévi restaurant in New York City.

Eatocracy and AC360°'s Devna Shukla
CNN

Editor's note: Tune in to "Hope Survives: 30 Years of AIDS," an AC360° special report beginning 9pm ET Friday.

(CNN) - New Delhi-born Suvir Saran is the executive chef of Dévi restaurant in New York City, where his authentic Indian flavors earned one Michelin star in 2007 and 2008, as well as two stars from The New York Times and three stars from New York Magazine.

He is also the author of "Indian Home Cooking: A Fresh Introduction to Indian Food, with More Than 150 Recipes" and "American Masala: 125 New Classics From My Home Kitchen."

This is the first on a two-part interview with Saran on the subject of HIV/AIDS activism, the disease's impact on the food world and his personal life, his identity as an Indian and a gay man and the healing power of a good meal.

How did food help you to connect to the community?

After coming to the US, I started studies as a student of the visual arts and also working in retail. Each night I would cook dinners for friends and their friends. Each night brought new faces and new personalities into my world. A large number of those who came into my world in the early 90's were people that had been affected with HIV/AIDS personally and through loved ones. Seeing people one day and then hearing they had gone the next day or week or month, was one of the most difficult things to come to grips with.

Often the foods I prepared at these parties would incite some awe, give comfort and solicit wonderful reactions. One guest exclaimed at one of the gatherings that he wished he could have a bowl of my rice pudding every night until he passed away. He was so young and so vital, yet he was being eaten away by this disease. I was not able to give him many bowls of the pudding before he was robbed from our world by the disease. This haunts me to this date. I feel terrible that I did not bring him a bowl each day.

Another friend of mine, the proprietor of a great small cafe in NYC died of HIV/AIDS just a couple of years ago. His family again kept this a secret, or at the very least denied it. In doing so, they also kept us friends that knew this fact away from their son, who was also one of our dearest friends.

This friend of mine had given me comfort and a warm welcome when I was new in the US. I cried for days and months and still shed tears when I grasp the fact that his family denied us his company and him ours. In living a lie they felt they had succeeded in some botched manner. But in doing so, they robbed their son, and those that loved him of contact that could have healed and given hope.

While you are not HIV+, how would you address incorrect stigmas such as an HIV+ chef would transmit the disease to his patrons?

Full story on the Eatocracy blog

Editor's note:
Greater Than AIDS – a new national movement to respond to AIDS in America– is asking Americans to share their “Deciding Moments," personal experiences that changed how they think about the disease and inspired them to get involved. For many it is someone close to them who was infected. For some it was their own diagnosis. For others it was a realization that we all have a role to play. Tell us about your “Deciding Moment” by visiting: www.greaterthan.org/moment.

Related: Visit Greater Than AIDS for answers to frequently asked questions about HIV/AIDS, as well as information about local testing centers.


Filed under: 360° Radar • AIDS
January 13th, 2011
01:00 PM ET

Producer's Notebook: Keeping the hope alive

Editor's note: Tune in to "Hope Survives: 30 Years of AIDS," an AC360° beginning 9pm ET Friday.
Greater Than AIDS – a new national movement to respond to AIDS in America– is asking Americans to share their “Deciding Moments," personal experiences that changed how they think about the disease and inspired them to get involved. For many it is someone close to them who was infected. For some it was their own diagnosis. For others it was a realization that we all have a role to play. Tell us about your “Deciding Moment” by visiting: www.greaterthan.org/moment.

Ben Finley
AC360° Editorial Producer

(CNN) - When AC360°’s editorial department was first approached a few months back about producing the 9pm hour during the first two weeks of January, I must admit the initial reaction was one of mild panic. Not only were we already producing our normal time slot at 10pm ET, but now we’d be responsible for a second hour, with a completely different show. To raise that bar even higher, the holidays were rapidly approaching and the two-week period of the year where even cockroaches are on hiatus from the daily hubbub of New York City life was about to begin. How on Earth would we pull this off?

Despite the hurdles before us, we began to view this as a great opportunity to think outside the box and generate some really new and fantastic ideas for our viewers.

I began to think about the year 2011 and what events or moments in history would be having an anniversary. Having worked on HIV/AIDS projects in the past, it dawned on me that this would indeed be the 30th year since the first diagnosis of HIV/AIDS in America. It is almost too hard to believe that three decades of a disease that has defined my generation have really passed before our eyes. I thought to myself: How could we NOT spend at least one of our shows looking into this incredibly long journey, the stigmas still surrounding this disease, and why it is that we still do not have a cure?

After reaching out to a handful of individuals who could speak best to the legacy of this terrible disease, my first response was a resounding yes from Sir Elton John. For those who might not realize it, 20 years ago, Elton John became quite active with HIV/AIDS awareness after being inspired by a young, HIV positive hemophiliac named Ryan White. It was then that he created the Elton John AIDS Foundation and began trying to generate greater public awareness and better understanding about how to fight the stigmas surrounding HIV/AIDS.
FULL POST


Filed under: 360° Radar • AIDS • Ben Finley
January 13th, 2011
12:45 PM ET

Letters to the President: #724 'Nice job'

Tom Foreman | BIO
AC360° Correspondent

Reporter's Note: President Obama spoke in Arizona last night in the wake of the shootings there.

Dear Mr. President,

Nice job on the speech last night. I was a little startled by all the cheering and I wondered at first if you were too. I realize it was not billed as a memorial service, but the generally loud atmosphere surprised me. Still, I read a comment from some local leader there who said it was just what the local people needed to release a lot of pent up emotion, so if it worked, so much the better.

I used to possess no understanding of the impact of tragedies like this on the larger community. It was easy to see how and why it affected the people who were directly involved, but the idea that people who simply lived in the area would be traumatized seemed strange. Then the Columbine shootings happened.

I think I've mentioned before that we lived only a few miles from the school, went to events there, and knew some people who were inside during the gunfire. I was also assigned to cover the killings. So for pretty much a straight month I was on the story all day, then sat up half the night talking about it with my wife - about friends who were struggling with grief, guilt, and fear. We were profoundly sad. Not just for those who were hurt or killed, but also for the lost sense of safety in our neighborhood.
FULL POST

January 13th, 2011
11:23 AM ET

Memorial to honor youngest victim of Arizona mass shootings

CNN Wire Staff

Tucson, Arizona (CNN) - A memorial on Thursday will honor the youngest victim of the Arizona mass shooting, a 9-year-old dancer and swimmer whose untimely death has broken hearts nationwide.

Six people were killed and 13 others wounded when a gunman opened fire Saturday at Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' meet-and-greet event in Tucson. Giffords was among the injured.

The youngest victim, Christina Green, was born on September 11, 2001. Christina had just been elected to the student council at her elementary school, and was attending the event with a neighbor. She was there to meet the lawmaker when the gunman struck.

The neighbor, Suzi Hileman, was shot three times and is recovering, but is struggling emotionally with the girl's death, relatives said.

Christina entered the world "on a tragic day and she went out on a tragic day," said her father, John Green. "There's going to be a lot of those kind of moments that - I had one this morning, just waking up. She comes up and says, 'Daddy, it's time to get up.' She didn't do that this morning."

Obama eulogized the victims at a service at the University of of Arizona Wednesday night. He paid special attention to the young girl whose life was cut short.

"In Christina we see all of our children. So curious, so trusting, so energetic, so full of magic. So deserving of our love. And so deserving of our good example," Obama said.

"Christina was an A student; she was a dancer; she was a gymnast; she was a swimmer. She decided that she wanted to be the first woman to play in the Major Leagues, and as the only girl on her Little League team, no one put it past her."

The president said she had a unique appreciation for life.

"She'd remind her mother, 'We are so blessed. We have the best life,' " the president said. "And she'd pay those blessings back by participating in a charity that helped children who were less fortunate."

Full story


Filed under: 360° Radar • 360º Follow
January 13th, 2011
11:17 AM ET
January 13th, 2011
11:15 AM ET

Giffords' progress a source of jubilation

CNN Wire Staff

Tucson, Arizona (CNN) - They described it as "a miracle."

Shot in the head less than a week ago, U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords opened her eyes briefly for the first time Wednesday, with her husband, her parents and other members of Congress in the room.

"It was extraordinary," said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-New York, who was holding Giffords' hand at the time. "It was a miracle to witness."

The incident occurred shortly after President Barack Obama had visited Giffords in her hospital room. Less than an hour later, given permission to disclose the information by Mark Kelly, Giffords' husband, Obama electrified a memorial-service crowd and a national television audience by revealing one of the most promising pieces of news about Gifford's condition to emerge since an assassination attempt against her on Saturday.

Giffords was squeezing and stroking Gillibrand's hand, as doctors previously said she had been able to do.

Giffords "absolutely could hear everything we were saying," Gillibrand said. "And Debbie (Wasserman Schultz, D-Florida) and I were telling her how much she was inspiring the nation with her courage, her strength, and we were talking about the things we wanted to do as soon as she was better."

Gillibrand mentioned having another night out with Giffords and her husband for beer and pizza. And Wasserman Schultz recounted telling her, "Come on, you've got to get better, because we expect you up in New Hampshire this summer" at Wasserman Schultz's vacation home.

"And just as I said that, that's when she suddenly was struggling to open ... her eyes," Wasserman Schultz said. "First just a little bit. And the doctors couldn't believe it. They said, 'This is such a good time.' "

Kelly saw her struggling, Gillibrand said, and he and the others began to encourage her, saying, "Open your eyes, Gabby. Open your eyes."

And Giffords did - actually opening only one eye, as the other remains bandaged, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters.

"She took a moment to focus, you could see she was focusing," Gillibrand said. "And then Mark said ... 'Gabby, if you can see me, if you can see me, give us a thumbs-up ... She didn't only give a thumbs-up, she literally raised her entire hand. We were just - we couldn't stop crying ... It was just one of those moments that life brings you so rarely."

But Giffords didn't stop there, Gillibrand said. She reached out and grabbed her husband "and is touching him and starts to really choke him like she was really trying to hug him." He asked her to touch his wedding ring, "and she touches his ring, then she grabs his whole watch and wrist and then the doctor was just so excited, he said, 'You don't understand ... this is amazing what she is doing right now and beyond our greatest hopes.'"

Full story


Filed under: 360° Radar • 360º Follow
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