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May 11th, 2010
09:45 PM ET

A Cure for Spinal Injuries?: Join the Live Chat

A trainer who runs a California clinic claims to hold the key to helping spinal injury patients walk again.  But some doctors say it could be a hoax. We give you an up close look at the controversy. Plus,  the blame game in the Gulf oil spill and more.

Want to know what else we're covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog
May 11th, 2010
08:48 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Oil Spill Blame Game

A fish killed by unknown causes washed ashore in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, on Monday.

A fish killed by unknown causes washed ashore in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, on Monday.

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

There is still no accurate timetable for controlling the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Today lawmakers on Capitol Hill tried to find out who's responsible for the mess. They got few answers and lot of finger-pointing.

At the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing, the owner and operator of the well, BP, said the fault lies with the company it hired to work the well: Transocean. BP officials specifically pointed to Transocean's valve, or blowout preventer, that was supposed to cut off the oil after the accident; but it failed. Meanwhile, Transocean is pushing blame in two directions. First, back at BP and second, it blames subcontractor Halliburton, which encased the well in cement. As you might predict, Halliburton is also denying responsibility and says the focus should be on Transocean and BP.

We're keeping them honest tonight on 360°. Tom Foreman will break down the blame game and show you how this is playing out.

Senators on both sides of the aisle are not happy with the denials from the three big companies.

"It doesn't benefit any one of them for BP to be pointing the finger at Transocean, to be pointing the finger at Halliburton, to be pointing the finger back, at BP, because if there is no offshore exploration activity then BP's not going to be working out there, Halliburton's not going to be working out there and Transocean's not going to be working out there. So they've got to resolve, all of them, that the effort now is to make sure that we never see a disaster of this magnitude again," said Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), a supporter of offshore drilling, at a news conference this afternoon.

"I think it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that there is no such thing as 'too safe to spill,' " said Sen. Bob Menendez (D-New Jersey), a critic of offshore drilling, at today's hearing.

Meanwhile, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar spoke about the crisis on CNN's Situation Room today. He said everything is being done to try to stop the oil leak as "fast as possible."

"Best case: That it starts coming into some kind of containment over the weekend and into next week and the next couple of weeks. Worst case is looking at August with a relief drill," Salazar said.

We’ll also continue Nic Robertson's eye-opening report on the new jihad training ground here in the U.S. - maybe even in your town. Nic spent the last year retracing the steps of a young American, to determine how the former altar boy from Long Island, New York became determined to kill for al Qaeda.

Also tonight, in Washington state three men and a woman are accused of killing a man over a diamond ring. All four are charged with the murder of Jim Sanders on April 28 after he posted an ad for the ring on Craigslist. Sanders, his wife and their two sons, ages 14 and 10, were restrained with plastic handcuffs during the deadly home invasion, investigator said. Sander’s wife is speaking out. Hear what she said she and her family faced that day.

Join us for these stories and much more starting at 10 p.m. ET. See you then.


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
May 11th, 2010
07:23 PM ET

Welcome to the Hollywood Walk of...oops!

CNN producer David Daniel's photo of the misspelled star.

CNN producer David Daniel's photo of the misspelled star.

Program Note: Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus will be on the show tonight with CNN producer David Daniel to talk about her misspelled star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Watch AC360° at 10 p.m. ET. for the interview.

David Daniel
CNN Senior Entertainment Producer


I'm a longtime copy editor, and I take the Metro to work. As a result, I made one person laugh hysterically today, and another almost vomit.

Let me explain.

As I emerged from the Hollywood and Vine Metro station this morning and headed for the CNN Los Angeles bureau, I noticed two workmen cleaning off the newest star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for the 11:30 a.m. unveiling ceremony. It was for Julia Louis-Dreyfus, star of "The New Adventures of Old Christine" – and the first "Seinfeld" alum to receive a star on the Walk of Fame. I glanced at it as I walked by... then stopped, and peered more closely:

Keep reading...


Filed under: 360° Radar
May 11th, 2010
07:09 PM ET

Video: Julia Louis-Dreyfus gets her star

Program Note: Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus will be on the show tonight with CNN senior entertainment producer David Daniel to talk about her misspelled star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Watch AC360° at 10 p.m. ET. for the interview.


Filed under: 360° Radar
May 11th, 2010
06:31 PM ET
May 11th, 2010
06:18 PM ET

Looking for entrepreneurs in the Muslim world

Amy Wilkinson
Special to CNN

The Presidential Summit on Entrepreneurship late last month marked a turning point in U.S. foreign policy. Did you hear about this summit? Likely not, as headlines focused on the oil spill, the bomb scare in Times Square and the Supreme Court nomination. And with the U.S. unemployment rate at nearly 10 percent, promoting prosperity abroad is difficult for the White House to tout at home.

Still, President Obama pledged in Cairo, Egypt, last June to build a new beginning with Muslim nations, and entrepreneurship provides an innovative new tool.

Obama was keeping his promise to deepen partnerships between the United States and the Muslim world when he invited 275 entrepreneurs from Muslim-majority countries to participate in the Washington summit. Selected delegates came from more than 50 countries, including Iraq, India, Indonesia and Kazakhstan.

The gathering marked an important shift in foreign policy. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who spoke at the event's conclusion, said "the summit reflects the new approach to foreign policy that President Obama described last year at Cairo University, one that we have been putting into practice through partnerships based on shared values, mutual respect and mutual responsibility."

In the past, U.S. engagement with the Muslim world has focused primarily on defeating al Qaeda, ending the war in Iraq and deterring Iran's nuclear ambitions.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Global 360° • Islam • Opinion • President Barack Obama • Raw Politics
May 11th, 2010
05:49 PM ET

Interactive: The spread of homegrown terrorism

Program note: CNN Senior International Correspondent Nic Robertson spent a year investigating convicted terrorist, Bryant Neal Vinas. He is now on assignment in Pakistan tracking down details of Times Square bombing suspect Faisal Shahzad. Watch AC360° tonight at 10pm ET to see Parts 2 & 3 of Robertson's report. Watch CNN"s "American Al Qaeda: The Story of Bryant Neal Vinas" on Saturday and Sunday, May 15-16, at 8pm ET.

Paul Cruickshank and Nic Robertson
CNN

Nearly a decade ago, a group of Saudis and other men from the Middle East came to the United States to carry out the worst terrorist attack on the U.S.

Not a single one had American citizenship.

Almost nine years after the September 11 attacks, the threat of another major terror strike is still a concern, but where the threat is coming from has changed.

A growing number of American citizens and longtime residents of the United States are becoming radicalized enough by al Qaeda's extremist ideology to kill their fellow Americans, counterterrorism officials say.

A growing number are also learning the bomb-making skills necessary to become potentially dangerous terrorists, the officials say. They are training in the mountains of Waziristan in northwestern Pakistan, where al Qaeda still enjoys significant safety.

That's where, according to the U.S. government, alleged Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad was trained by the Pakistani Taliban, a group with close ties to al Qaeda.

Shahzad's case has strong similarities to that of another American who plotted with terrorist groups in Pakistan to attack the United States. His name is Bryant Neal Vinas, a Catholic convert to Islam from Long Island, New York, who became radicalized, traveled to Pakistan to join up with al Qaeda and helped Osama bin Laden's terrorist organization plot a bomb attack on New York City.

When news of Vinas' arrest broke last summer, family members, friends and terrorism experts where dumbfounded by how a studious, middle-class, baseball-loving, all-American kid and onetime U.S. Army recruit could end up plotting to kill in the name of al Qaeda.

Keep Reading...

May 11th, 2010
05:12 PM ET

Financial Dispatch: ‘No smoking gun’ in market meltdown

Investigators are still unclear what caused the Dow's 1,000 point drop last week.

Investigators are still unclear what caused the Dow's 1,000 point drop last week.

Andrew Torgan
CNN Business News Producer

It’s been five days since the Dow plummeted nearly 1,000 points in less than 10 minutes and there is still no concrete answer to the question: “What the heck happened?”

In testimony before a House Financial Services subcommittee looking into last Thursday’s so-called “flash crash,” executives from the nation's major stock exchanges said the plunge was triggered by a combination of unusual factors, but that its ultimate cause remains a mystery.

Eric Noll, executive vice president of the Nasdaq OMX Group, said in prepared remarks that his exchange continues to investigate, “but has at present located no ‘smoking gun’ that single-handedly caused or explains Thursday's events.”

Larry Leibowitz, chief operating officer of NYSE Euronext, said, “Although some of the underlying economic and global financial conditions that influenced this selling activity are known, the exact succession of events and what precipitated them remain unclear.”

FULL POST


Filed under: Andrew Torgan • Economy
May 11th, 2010
04:32 PM ET

Video: Spinal injury patient miracle?

Program Note: CNN's Alina Cho reports on Project Walk, a spinal injury clinic that has patients rising to their feet and doctors raising eyebrows. In this web-only clip, Cho speaks with clinic patient Kendell Hall about her progress. Watch AC360° at 10 p.m. ET. for the full report.


Filed under: 360° Radar • Alina Cho • Medical News
May 11th, 2010
03:15 PM ET

Beat 360° 5/11/10

Ready for today's Beat 360°? Everyday we post a picture you provide the caption and our staff will join in too. Tune in tonight at 10pm to see if you are our favorite! Here is the 'Beat 360°' pic:

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich addresses the Republican National Committee's State Chairman's meeting at the Gaylord National Hotel and Convention Center today in National Harbor, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Have fun with it. We're looking forward to your captions! Make sure to include your name, city, state (or country) so we can post your comment.

________________________________________________________________________________ Beat 360° Challenge


Filed under: Beat 360° • T1
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