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March 3rd, 2010
09:52 PM ET

Health Care Power Play: Chat During AC360°

Tonight on 360°, Pres. Obama's end game for health care reform. He's made some concessions and is calling on Congress to pass a bill now. We'll break it down of you. See what's in the bill and what it could mean for you and your family. Plus, we kick off a new series "Cost of Entry". Do rich candidates have a better chance of winning an election? See what Randi Kaye discovered.

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog • T1
March 3rd, 2010
06:56 PM ET
March 3rd, 2010
06:46 PM ET

Revised guidelines for Prostate Cancer screening

Program Note: Don't miss Anderson's conversation with Dr. Sanjay Gupta about the revised guidelines tonight. AC360° at 10 p.m. ET.

The American Cancer Society

In revised guidelines made publicly available today, the American Cancer Society said that most men 50 and older should seriously consider the potential risks of treatment before deciding whether to be screened for prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer screening consists of the prostate specific antigen, or PSA, blood test or a digital rectal examination.

While these tests can detect cancer, they also can produce false positive results that lead to unnecessary and uncomfortable biopsies and treatments that carry undesirable side effects such as impotence and urinary incontinence.

On the other hand, tests that appear normal can overlook existing cancers.

The guidelines place greater emphasis on individual counseling by doctors. Meanwhile, the American Urological Association says all men should have baseline PSA test at 40.

Read the revised guidelines here...

March 3rd, 2010
06:40 PM ET

Chile quake hit poor communities hardest


John Rector
Special to CNN

Images of destroyed homes, people sleeping in the streets and broken freeways reveal the recent tragedy of Chile. Who would think that after the horror of Port-au-Prince, restless geological plates would so quickly wreak havoc in another nation? The Earth seems at war with itself.

But, as many have observed, Chile is not Haiti. Chile's economy is one of the fastest-growing in Latin America. This earthquake will do little to slow down that down. In Santiago, dominated by industries, corporate offices and financial institutions, most people will return to work within a week.

But there is another side of Chile for which the picture cannot be as optimistic: the depressed areas that have never enjoyed the nation's economic boom. These are "callampas," or impoverished wards of major cities and small towns that have been bypassed by progress. Unfortunately, the earthquake has hit these areas the hardest. The question is now, how will the government address these people's need for housing and employment?

In stark contrast to the coast, inland from the quake's epicenter are some of the finest vineyards in the country. They were spared by the tsunami that destroyed some coastal towns, and although they sustained some damage from the quake, their grapes will soon be on our tables to join the avocados and berries that Chile shares with the Northern Hemisphere.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Chile Earthquake
March 3rd, 2010
06:30 PM ET

Cost of Entry: 50 million bucks!

Program Note: Don't miss Randi Kaye's full report on the cost of entry into politics tonight on AC360° at 10 p.m. ET.

Republican Senate Candidate Linda McMahon.

Republican Senate Candidate Linda McMahon.

Randi Kaye | BIO
AC360° Correspondent

What would you do with $50 million? Would you spend it on a campaign for the U.S. Senate?

That’s what Republican Senate Candidate, Linda McMahon, says she’s willing to do to get to Washington. She’s been campaigning in Connecticut and has said she’s willing to spend her own money - $50 million bucks – on her campaign if necessary.

We tried to interview Linda McMahon for our story on AC360° tonight, but her campaign staff repeatedly told us she was too busy. So, last night, we went to her in Hartford, CT.

She was debating her two primary opponents, who aren’t exactly hurting, but have considerably less than money than she does.

Candidate Rob Simmons has raised about $3 million dollars, and Peter Schiff earned about $17 million just last year, but even that may not be enough to compete with McMahon.

If you recognize her name, you must be a fan of wrestling. McMahon and her husband, Vince McMahon, co-founded Worldwide Wrestling Entertainment. As she tells it, they were bankrupt all those years ago and then turned that bankruptcy into a billion dollar business.

FULL POST


Filed under: Randi Kaye • Raw Politics
March 3rd, 2010
05:05 PM ET

The calm after the storm

Andrew Rubin
Special to AC360°

On Tuesday I woke up to the sound of the television in the living room. A sharp contrast to how I’ve woken for the past three mornings: to temblores that shake me awake.

A friend, camped out on my couch, had been watching a movie with the volume way too loud for 7:20 in the morning. Originally my couch surfing friend was supposed to catch a flight to Buenos Aires, Argentina Saturday afternoon. But because the Santiago airport is now open only to national and incoming international flights, Mr. Surfer is trapped for the foreseeable future.

It was an uncharacteristically cold and gray day in Santiago; very strange because the past four months have been sunny and warm with almost no sign of rain. It is my girlfriend’s birthday at the end of the week so I thought I would make my way down to the antique mall to see if I could find her a gift. Secretly my hope was that there would be something I could pick up that was slightly damaged from the quake and, therefore, a bit cheaper.

FULL POST

March 3rd, 2010
04:33 PM ET

Beat 360° 3/3/10

Ready for today's Beat 360°? Everyday we post a picture you provide the caption and our staff will join in too. Tune in tonight at 10pm to see if you are our favorite! Here is the 'Beat 360°' pic:

Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-NY) waves from an elevator on Capitol Hill March 3, 2010 in Washington, DC. Rangel announced he is temporarily stepping down as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee until the House ethics committee concludes an investigation into possible ethics violations.

Have fun with it. We're looking forward to your captions! Make sure to include your name, city, state (or country) so we can post your comment.

Beat 360° Winners:

Staff:

Ric Ward

"How come the Senate elevator has wood paneling and the House elevator has the cheap used furniture pads?"

Viewer:

Wonz

"If you need me, I'll be in the Dominican Republic... er, I mean my office!"

_________________________________________________________________________________ Beat 360° Challenge


Filed under: Beat 360° • T1
March 3rd, 2010
04:19 PM ET

Former Sea World Trainer: 'Whale captivity grossly unjust'

John Jett, Ph.D.
Stetson University

The recent death of a Sea World trainer should cause us as a society to ponder the wisdom of keeping large carnivores such as killer whales in captive environments. I too was a killer whale trainer at Sea World of Orlando in the early to mid 1990s. Having worked with Dawn Brancheau, the trainer who was tragically killed, I knew her to be a talented and capable trainer.

The majority of trainers I worked with were similarly dedicated, competent, and caring. I also worked extensively with Tillicum, the whale who perpetrated the attack. Despite his now infamous history, Tillicum appeared to me to be no more dangerous or plotting than any of the other killer whales in our care.

Danger aside, my dream of working closely with captive killer whales and other marine mammals eventually evolved to a point where I found it emotionally impossible to participate in their captivity. As a result of my direct experience, I’m now among a growing contingent who considers killer whale captivity grossly unjust. This general sentiment combined with Dawn’s recent death has added fervor toward Tillicum and others’ release back into the wild.

FULL POST

March 3rd, 2010
04:11 PM ET

Health care industry sick with medical waste

Wasteful spending accounts for half of the $2.2 trillion spent on health care in the United States, says a 2008 report.

Wasteful spending accounts for half of the $2.2 trillion spent on health care in the United States, says a 2008 report.

John Bonifield
CNN Medical Producer

In a home office, slipped inside file cabinets and stacked on top of workspaces, Cindy Holtzman has amassed a collection of "medical waste." She's not hoarding used syringes or old bandages. She's hanging on to hospital bills that are loaded with outrageous examples of money that was poorly spent.

"Nobody usually looks at their bills," Holtzman said. "There could be lots of mistakes."

Holtzman, a consumer advocate with Medical Billing Advocates of America, looks at medical bills for a living. Among the excessive charges she's seen: A patient in Florida was billed $140 dollars for one Tylenol pill; a patient in South Carolina was billed $1,000 for a tooth brush; a patient in Georgia was billed more than $4,000 for 41 bags of IV saline solution when she went to the emergency room for a two-hour visit and used just one bag.

In the Georgia example, Holtzman says, the patient's insurance company paid the entire claim.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Health Care
March 3rd, 2010
04:03 PM ET

Let men decide on prostate screening, cancer society says

The American Cancer Society recommends that men weigh the risks of treatment before agreeing to prostate screening.

Miriam Falco
CNN

Most men 50 and older should seriously consider the potential risks of treatment before deciding whether to be screened for prostate cancer, the American Cancer Society said Wednesday in revised guidelines.

"What we are trying to say to men is the harms (of prostate screening) are better proven than the benefits," said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society.

Prostate cancer screening consists of the prostate specific antigen, or PSA, blood test or a digital rectal examination.

While these tests can detect cancer, they also can produce false positive results that lead to unnecessary and uncomfortable biopsies and treatments that carry undesirable side effects such as impotence and urinary incontinence.

On the other hand, tests that appear normal can overlook existing cancers.

Keep reading...


Filed under: Health Care • Medical News
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