AC360 Tuesday 8p

Ferry crew members answered questions about why more life rafts were not deployed. Tonight on AC360, the latest from South Korea on the effort to reach victims.
January 26th, 2010
10:51 PM ET

What Haiti needs now – a future

Christiane at the rubble of the U.N.'s Headquarters in Haiti
Christiane at the rubble of the U.N.'s Headquarters in Haiti

Christiane Amanpour | BIO
CNN Chief International Correspondent
Anchor, Amanpour

In Haiti, the emergency phase is still in full swing. Yes, many official rescue efforts have been called off. But the truth is that international rescue crews are still being called out when there's a clue that somebody might be alive under the rubble.

Because of the miraculous rescue of a 24-year-old man on Saturday night, they are not giving up. Hope does diminish with each day, but the rescues haven’t ceased. So they may even pull more people out. I think that gives tremendous hope not just to people here in Port-au-Prince but to people everywhere.

This Sunday, we saw Mass and religious services here and around the country. This is a powerfully religious country. So many Haitians were not just mourning the family and friends they lost, but giving thanks for the survival of friends who made it through and for the resilience and resolve they have shown throughout this incredible crisis.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Christiane Amanpour • Haiti
January 26th, 2010
09:59 PM ET

'It's just survival'

Dr. Sanjay Gupta | BIO
AC360° Contributor
CNN Chief Medical Correspondent

A couple of days ago, a man was stoned to death about a block from where we are staying in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. I
have been down here nearly two weeks covering the earthquake devastation, having arrived quickly the morning after it occurred. I didn’t see the stoning myself, but several of my colleagues described a man who had been trying to steal money and was met with swift and deadly citizen justice. A lot was made of this particular tragedy, and if you caught only that headline, you might be left believing the incident was in some way emblematic of what was happening all over the place. Truth is, even though I braced myself to see rampant lawlessness and mob hostility, I wanted to blog about what I have actually seen.

As I drove through the streets of Port-au-Prince, just 16 hours after the earthquake, I was met with stunned stares and unfathomable grief, as parents tried to dig their babies out of the rubble and older kids did the same for their parents. It was heartbreaking. And though we raced out with our first aid bags to help those we could, it seemed like we would never be able to make a dent in the suffering. There were people who died in this earthquake and those who lived – but there were also a large number of people somehow caught in between. They were alive, but terribly injured and dying. That is where we focused our attention. Terrible crush injuries of arms and legs. Degloving injuries, where the skin of the arms or legs was ripped away. And, people so malnourished and dehydrated that they could barely walk.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Dr. Sanjay Gupta • Haiti Earthquake
January 26th, 2010
09:50 PM ET

Haiti by the numbers

CNN

Two weeks after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake devastated Haiti, the numbers have mounted. The numbers tell stories of death and destruction, as well as a global outpouring of aid.

CNN has compiled the latest, most reliable figures available as the devastation continues to unfold:

THE TOLL

150,000: Latest estimate of the death toll, from the Haitian Health Ministry. The European Union and the Pan American Health Organization, which are coordinating the health-sector response, have estimated the quake killed 200,000 people.
194,000: Number of injured
134: Estimated number of people rescued by international search teams since the quake

THE EFFECT

9 million: Population of Haiti
3 million: Estimated number of people affected by the quake
1 million: Estimated number of displaced people
800,000 to 1 million: People who need temporary shelter
235,000: People who have left Port-au-Prince using free transportation provided by the government. The number who left by private means is undetermined.
At least 50: Aftershocks of magnitude 4.5 or higher that have hit Haiti since the January 12 quake

Keep Reading...

January 26th, 2010
09:45 PM ET

Live Blog from the Anchor Desk 01/26/10

Tonight on 360°,  what's being down to try to find the nearly 5,000 missing Americans in Haiti.  Plus,  Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports on the damage to one of Haiti's medical schools and how it could impact the country's health crisis. We also continue our special report "The Stimulus Project". See how your tax dollars are being spent in hopes of boosting the economy.

Want to know what else we're covering? <strong><a href="http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/category/the-buzz/&#034; target="_blank">Read EVENING BUZZ</a></strong>

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&amp;*)


Filed under: Live Blog • T1
January 26th, 2010
08:45 PM ET

Interactive: The economy one year later

CNNMoney.com

A year can make a big difference in the economy. Or not so much in some cases. Take a look at some key economic indicators and how they've gone up, down and all around. Take a look at this interactive of unemployment, foreclosures, the market and fears of inflation.


Filed under: Economy • Stimulus
January 26th, 2010
06:20 PM ET

Stimulus and jobs: what the fight's all about

A shot of stimulus funds is aiding construction projects.
A shot of stimulus funds is aiding construction projects.

Tami Luhby
CNNMoney.Com Senior Writer

One of the most important questions surrounding the stimulus program is also one of the most controversial: How many jobs has it created?

The Obama administration credits the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act with turning around the economy and bringing America out of the worst downturn since the Great Depression. Without it, things would have been a lot worse.

Critics, particularly congressional Republicans, say that stimulus has done little to help the economy. They point to the high unemployment rate and to pork-barrel projects they say have done little good.

CNNMoney takes a closer look at the jobs debate.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Economy • President Barack Obama • Stimulus • Unemployment
January 26th, 2010
05:48 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Missing Americans in Haiti

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

Nearly 5,000 Americans are feared missing in Haiti.

At least 17 Americans could be buried where the Hotel Montana once stood. Tonight, Anderson will talk with daughter of man who was staying at the hotel.

We'll also give you a look at the one industry in Haiti that has not been crippled by the killer earthquake. The garment industry. Christiane Amanpour visited factories where they make clothing that's sold in the U.S., at Gap, Old Navy, JC Penney and other retailers.

"The big danger for us is that buyers start to look somewhere else for production.. then we are dead if that happens," Georges Sassine, a garment factory owner told Christiane.

Tonight, we're also continuing our special report "The Stimulus Project." On the eve of Pres. Obama's State of the Union Address, our own Ali Velshi is looking at whether the plan to boost to the economy is actually creating jobs.

360's Randi Kaye is also tracking your stimulus money. Have you noticed those signs on the side of highways touting the construction work is funded by American Recovery and Reinvestment Act? Turns out in Ohio the big signs cost up to $3,000. So, Ohio is using stimulus money to tout how it's using the money. We're keeping them honest.

Join us for these stories and much more at 10 p.m. ET.


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
January 26th, 2010
04:16 PM ET

Hard lessons, humility for big-city doctors in Haiti


Drs. Hiba Georges and Roberto Feliz, both from the Boston Medical Center in Massachusetts, talk to Elizabeth Cohen about the difficulties they encountered while trying to treat patients in Haiti.

Elizabeth Cohen | BIO
CNN Senior Medical Correspondent

Dr. Roberto Feliz and Dr. Hiba Georges were quickly jolted from the most modern of medical care in Boston, Massachusetts, to the most rudimentary of care when they flew to Haiti last week to work at a hospital housed in two tents run by the University of Miami.

The doctors, who worked at the Boston Medical Center, quickly learned that when you have no technology - not even the simplest blood test - you have to make medical decisions in an entirely different way.

The first death they witnessed taught them a valuable lesson.

The patient was a boy who needed his leg amputated or else he would die of either an infection or rhabdomyolysis, a kidney disease that follows injuries where muscles are crushed.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Elizabeth Cohen • Haiti
January 26th, 2010
04:08 PM ET

State of the Union speech unlikely to ease worries, analysts say

Ed Hornick
CNN

President Obama's State of the Union speech on Wednesday will be a tough sell for millions of Americans struggling under the weight of an economic recession, political analysts said.

"The president will respond as he always does to emergencies: with a speech. In this case, it's his State of the Union address," said David Frum, a CNN contributor and former speechwriter to President George W. Bush. "The Obama team always assumes the best remedy for any Obama difficulty is more Obama."

Frum said Obama's new populist tone, which he said emerged after the Democrats' surprising loss in the Massachusetts special Senate election - might work short-term if he uses it in Wednesday's speech, but it won't work over the long haul.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Barack Obama • Economy • President Barack Obama
January 26th, 2010
03:57 PM ET

Where does stimulus money come from?

The government can't count on the Federal Reserve to soak up $300 billion of Treasurys.
The government can't count on the Federal Reserve to soak up $300 billion of Treasurys.

Colin Barr
Senior writer

It's no secret that the government is borrowing huge sums of money. What may surprise you is how much of it is coming from the United States.

Rising domestic demand for U.S. debt allowed the government to sell more than $1.7 trillion of Treasurys during fiscal 2009. Those sales paid for billions of dollars of stimulus spending, without drawing unusually large contributions from overseas creditors such as China or triggering a long-feared interest rate spike.

The big question is whether the feds can pull off that trick again in 2010.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Economy • Stimulus
« older posts