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December 9th, 2009
05:35 PM ET

Interactive: Side-by-side comparison of the House and Senate Bills

The battle over health care reform has energized people on both sides of the debate.

The battle over health care reform has energized people on both sides of the debate.

Kaiser Family Foundation

Comprehensive health reform legislation is currently being debated in Congress. On November 7, 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Affordable Health Care for America Act and the U.S. Senate introduced the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on November 18, 2009. The following summaries of these bills focus on provisions to expand health care coverage, control health care costs, and improve the health care delivery system. These summaries will be updated to reflect changes made during the legislative process.

House Leadership Bill
Affordable Health Care for America Act (H.R. 3962)
Date plan announced: October 29, 2009 (passed by the House November 7, 2009)

Overall approach to expanding access to coverage:
Require most individuals to have health insurance. Create a Health Insurance Exchange through which individuals and smaller employers can purchase health coverage, with premium and cost-sharing credits available to individuals/families with incomes up to 400% of the federal poverty level (the poverty level is $18,310 for a family of three in 2009). Require employers to provide coverage to employees or pay into a Health Insurance Exchange Trust Fund, with exceptions for certain small employers, and provide certain small employers a credit to offset the costs of providing coverage. Impose new regulations on plans participating in the Exchange and in the small group insurance market. Expand Medicaid to 150% of the poverty level.

Senate Leadership Bill
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (H.R. 3590)
Date plan announced: Nov. 18, 2009

Overall approach to expanding access to coverage:
Require most U.S. citizens and legal residents to have health insurance. Create state-based American Health Benefit Exchanges through which individuals can purchase coverage, with premium and cost-sharing credits available to individuals/families with income between 100-400% of the federal poverty level (the poverty level is $18,310 for a family of three in 2009) and create separate Exchanges through which small businesses can purchase coverage. Require employers to pay penalties for employees who receive tax credits for health insurance through an Exchange, with exceptions for small employers. Impose new regulations on health plans in the Exchanges and in the individual and small group markets. Expand Medicaid to 133% of the federal poverty level.

Go here to view the complete comparison of the House and Senate Bills.


Filed under: Health Care
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