AC360 Monday 8p

There are growing questions about the ferry crew's actions. The latest on the South Korean ferry disaster live on AC360.
December 4th, 2009
11:43 PM ET

Interactive: The evidence in the Knox trial

CNN

Amanda Knox is accused of murdering her roommate, British student Meredith Kercher, on November 2, 2007, in Italy. She faces life in prison if found guilty.

Go here and scroll down to view the evidence in the Knox trial.


Filed under: 360° Radar • Crime
December 4th, 2009
10:58 PM ET
December 4th, 2009
09:48 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Amanda Knox Guilty of Murder

Amanda Knox is driven into court at midnight in Perugia, Italy, to hear the verdict in her murder trial.
Amanda Knox is driven into court at midnight in Perugia, Italy, to hear the verdict in her murder trial.

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

American Amanda Knox is facing 26 years in an Italian prison after a jury convicted her of murdering her roommate Meredith Kercher, while they were exchange students in the city of Perugia in 2007. Knox's Italian ex-boyfriend was also convicted. Raffaele Sollecito was sentenced to 25 years.

The two were convicted of all charges, except theft. They must pay 5 million euros to the victim's family. Knox must also pay 40,000 euros to a man who she falsely accused of the killing.

When the judge read the jury's verdict, Knox started to weep and said "No, no."

In a written statement, Knox's parents said they were "extremely disappointed" in the verdict.

"While we always knew this was a possibility, we find it difficult to accept this verdict when we know that she is innocent, and that the prosecution has failed to explain why there is no evidence of Amanda in the room where Meredith was so horribly and tragically murdered," they said.

"It appears clear to us that the attacks on Amanda's character in much of the media and by the prosecution had a significant impact on the judges and jurors and apparently overshadowed the lack of evidence in the prosecution's case against her."

Prosecutors said Kercher died during a sex game in which Knox taunted her while Sollecito and an acquaintance Rudy Guede sexually assaulted her. Guede was convicted in a separate trial and is appealing.

Tonight on 360°, you'll hear from Knox's aunt.

"They [the jury/the italian legal system] screwed up. They made a huge mistake. People are cheering about it now. I'm disgusted by that. I'm absolutely disgusted my family had to come out of that courtroom and hear people cheering Amanda has been convicted of something she had nothing to do with it," said Janet Huff on CNN's Campbell Brown show.

"What upsets me most about this is, i guess you can't change an entire country's way of justice and their court system, but the fact their jurors are not sequestered, they are allowed to go home, talk to their friends, reads the newspapers and go online, read whatever they want and believe it or not that does affect their decision-making process," she added.

Do you agree with the verdict? Share your thoughts below.

Join us for this story and much more starting at 10 p.m. ET on CNN. See you then!


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
December 4th, 2009
09:45 PM ET

Live Blog from the Anchor Desk 12/04/09

Tonight on 360°, an American convicted of murder in Italy. Friends and family of Amanda Knox speak out. Hear why they're outraged at the jury's decision. Plus, another mistake uncovered in the Maurice Clemmons case. He's the man who shot to death four cops in Washington State. And, Hillary Clinton talks about her role – Mother of the Bride.

Want to know what else we're covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog • T1
December 4th, 2009
09:04 PM ET

Interactive: Are things really getting better?

CNN

Last quarter, the economy grew by the largest amount since the summer of 2007, but there are signs that things are still getting worse.

Go here and learn more about the ups and downs of the economy.


Filed under: Economy
December 4th, 2009
08:33 PM ET

The failure of the H-1B visa program

Editor's Note: This article continues our series excerpted from AC360°'s contributor David Gewirtz's upcoming book, How To Save Jobs, which will be available in December. Over the next few months, we'll be excerpting the first section of the book, which answers the question, "How did we get here?" Last time, we looked at how the dot-com bubble lost $5 trillion. This time, we begin our look at outsourcing and how its hurting American jobs. To learn more about the book, follow David on Twitter @DavidGewirtz.

David Gewirtz | BIO
AC360° Contributor
Editor-in-Chief, ZATZ Publishing

To many Americans, the word "outsourcing" is a four-letter word. It implies, as Ross Perot called it, a "giant sucking sound," where jobs leave the United States for less advantaged countries.

Perot was concerned about NAFTA in the early 1990s sucking good paying American jobs to Mexico, but as it turns out, he had no idea what was coming - and certainly no idea of the magnitude of the problem we'd be facing a couple of decades later. As you'll see, NAFTA is the least of our worries.

We've been actively permitting foreign companies to set up shop here, and then bring in their people to displace ours.

Outsourcing is one of our main job-related problems and I'll talk more about it later in this chapter. But it's not our only problem. In fact, the policy of the American government over the last half a decade or so has not only made outsourcing economically viable, it's all but encouraged bringing foreign workers into the United States.

And, in a shining example of your tax dollars at work, we weren't just bringing foreign nationals into the United States, we've been actively permitting foreign companies to set up shop here, and then bring in their people to displace ours.

FULL POST


Filed under: David Gewirtz • Economy • Opinion
December 4th, 2009
06:22 PM ET

Holiday communicating: What’s left unsaid

Emma Lacey-Bordeaux
CNN Researcher

As the holidays approach I've been thinking about communication. Working at CNN as a researcher, my communication is dominated by the written and spoken word for nine hours straight. On a slow day I will work on 10 scripts and go through 100 emails. When I’m not reading and writing, I’m speaking – to our reporters in every corner of the world. At the end of the day my voice is tired from talking and my fingers from typing. Only a tiny percentage of my communication at CNN is non-verbal.

During the holiday season I have to re-adjust my own thinking on communication because of the symbolic, tangible and non-verbal holiday communication. At my family's Thanksgiving for example we communicate affection, connection and community through carefully prepared food eaten together. For me the significance and power of this communication was heightened this year when, for the first time, my boyfriend's family and my family dined together. Stefan's aunt's sweet potatoes were joyfully scarfed down alongside my father's Turkish zucchini and my first-ever attempt at a turkey. That which divides us was left unspoken and our togetherness communicated by a bountiful table, full stomachs and smiling faces.

FULL POST


Filed under: Emma Lacey-Bordeaux • Thanksgiving
December 4th, 2009
06:17 PM ET

Guilty until proven guilty

Editor's Note: An Italian jury found American student Amanda Knox guilty in the knifing death of British student Meredith Kercher. Barbie Nadeau will be on AC360° tonight at 10 p.m. E.T. to discuss the case.

Amanda Knox is led into the court in Perugia Friday
Amanda Knox is led into the court in Perugia Friday

Barbie Nadeau
Newsweek Magazine

Amanda Knox is a household name in Italy, America, and the United Kingdom. Her face is immediately recognizable; her alleged crimes well known. (For those living under a rock for the last two years, she is the Seattle native standing trial in Perugia, Italy, for the sexual assault and murder of her British study-abroad roommate Meredith Kercher.) After a tedious trial that began last January, a verdict is expected sometime late Friday night or early Saturday morning. If she is convicted, she will likely get a life sentence. If she is acquitted, she'll be on the first flight back to Seattle—along with every journalist who can get a seat.

But even if she escapes a prison term, "Foxy Knoxy" (as she called herself on social networking Web sites) has already lost the battle for her image. She still has defenders, in addition to her very vocal opponents, but she will never again be able to control how she is seen. In the press, Knox is portrayed either as an angel-faced devil or the clean-cut girl next door. Few follow her case without bordering on obsession. She is the darling of Italy's front pages and the vixen of the British tabloid press. Bloggers, at least six book authors, and a high-budget British Channel 4 documentary filmmaker are harvesting her cult following for big bucks. Rumors abound that her own high-dollar book deal is in the works. There is even talk of a movie about her life. She is 22.

Read More...


Filed under: Crime
December 4th, 2009
05:55 PM ET

Photo Gallery: Amanda Knox's childhood

CNN

Amanda Knox, who is accused of murdering her roommate in Italy, was an easy child to raise in Seattle, Washington, along with her younger sisters Deanna and Ashley, her parents said. She took to soccer early on but hit the books as hard as she played.

Go here and scroll down to view a photo gallery of Amanda Knox's childhood.

December 4th, 2009
05:55 PM ET

Raw Data: Offenders on compact supervision

Editor's Note: We take a look tonight at the case of Maurice Clemmons and the legal provision called Interstate Compact Supervision that allows offenders across state lines amidst pending charges.We'll have more tonight at 10 p.m. ET.

Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision

TOTAL OFFENDERS SUPERVISED FOR OTHER STATES

TOTAL OFFENDERS TRANSFERRED TO OTHER STATES

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Puerto Rico

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

US Virgin Islands

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

3,423

254

1,746

2,860

7,181

2,290

1,033

464

563

6,899

4,360

228

664

5,995

3,452

1,356

2,267

2,832

2,095

478

3,038

2,404

2,132

1,569

1,889

3,034

443

940

946

555

2,530

2,011

4,899

1,250

668

3,602

3,350

1,369

3,311

312

479

2,368

421

3,899

6,733

38

562

330

3,101

2,527

1,228

1,333

584

1,731

274

2,514

2,597

4,460

2,929

1,381

443

398

7,193

8,829

537

1,447

3,774

2,356

1,035

2,315

3,446

2,074

306

1,671

1,180

2,087

2,641

1,319

5,341

1,023

452

1,080

759

3,747

1,196

3,689

4,207

463

2,875

1,378

1,909

4,572

112

1,088

510

828

2,293

11,429

12

416

346

7,211

1,046

693

3,035


Filed under: 360° Radar • Crime & Punishment
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