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November 16th, 2009
09:02 PM ET

New mammogram recommendations

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's new mammography recommendations have raised controversy.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's new mammography recommendations have raised controversy.

Preventive Services Task Force
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Women in their 40s should not get routine mammograms for early detection of breast cancer, according to updated guidelines set forth by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Before having a mammogram, women ages 40 to 49 should talk to their doctors about the risks and benefits of the test, and then decide if they want to be screened, according to the task force.

For women ages 50 to 74, it recommends routine mammography screenings every two years. Risks and benefits for women age 75 and above are unknown, it said.

Find the full recommendations here.


Filed under: 360° Radar • Medical News
November 16th, 2009
08:47 PM ET

Sarah Palin wants to friend you

Matthew Continetti
Special to CNN

Sarah Palin appears on Oprah on Monday to mark the launch of her book, "Going Rogue." She'll follow up with an extensive interview with Barbara Walters, a multicity book tour and appearances on the Fox News Channel and talk radio.

She'll grab plenty of headlines. As you read about Palin's old-media tour, it's important to remember that she's also a pioneer in the political use of new social media. Not that she gets any credit.

Sometimes the most important revolutions are the quiet ones. This is especially true in the case of technology, which has a way of sneaking up on us.

Take cell phones, for example. A decade ago, they were a luxury item. Suddenly, everyone seemed to have one. What had once been a sign of status became commonplace, all with hardly anybody noticing - and without any central direction.

Keep Reading...


Filed under: Barack Obama • Democrats • John McCain • Republicans • Sarah Palin • Technology
November 16th, 2009
07:31 PM ET

Task force opposes routine mammograms for women age 40-49

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's new mammography recommendations have raised controversy.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's new mammography recommendations have raised controversy.

Danielle Dellorto
CNN Medical Producer

Women in their 40s should not get routine mammograms for early detection of breast cancer, according to updated guidelines set forth by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Before having a mammogram, women ages 40 to 49 should talk to their doctors about the risks and benefits of the test, and then decide if they want to be screened, according to the task force.

For women ages 50 to 74, it recommends routine mammography screenings every two years. Risks and benefits for women age 75 and above are unknown, it said.

The group's previous recommendation was for routine screenings every year or two for women age 40 and older.

The task force is composed of 16 health care experts, none of whom are oncologists. The group reviews medical data and bases recommendations on effectiveness and risks involved.

"All we are saying is, at age 40, a woman should make an appointment with her doctor and have a conversation about the benefits and harms of having a mammography now versus waiting to age 50," said Dr. Diana Petitti, vice chair of the task force.

While roughly 15 percent of women in their 40s detect breast cancer through mammography, many other women experience false positives, anxiety, and unnecessary biopsies as a result of the test, according to data.

Read More...

November 16th, 2009
06:45 PM ET

Who would be most impacted by the Stupak amendment?

Rep. Bart Stupak

Rep. Bart Stupak

Brian Beutler
TPM

The Stupak amendment has touched off a furious argument among Democratic politicians and elites–one that could tank the entire health care reform project if it's not resolved by the time legislation comes up for a final vote in the House.

For the most part, the argument has been about justice. The Stupak amendment would forbid anybody who receives new government health insurance subsidies from buying policies that cover abortion. So why should women's health care be treated differently than other kinds of health care? Is it fair to prevent women, forced into the health care market, from buying any insurance policy she wants, even if they have some government assistance?

But somewhat less prominently, these same combatants have been at odds about what the practical effect of the Stupak amendment would actually be. There's substantial lack of clarity on that score–many say it's likely that there will be no abortion coverage in the exchange at all, and others hypothesize that, over time, the norms in the exchange will come to dominate the norms across the insurance market. At this point, that's all theoretical. But there is at least some data on the immediate practical implications of the Stupak amendment: It will, at least, directly and immediately impact a small, but growing number of poor and middle-class women.

Read More...


Filed under: Health Care
November 16th, 2009
06:38 PM ET

Video: Killings at the Canal

Abbie Boudreau
CNN Special Investigative Correspondent

November 16th, 2009
06:26 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Pension Outrage, Tracking Your Tax Dollars

William Jefferson, shown with his wife, Andrea, represented the New Orleans area in Congress for 18 years.

William Jefferson, shown with his wife, Andrea, represented the New Orleans area in Congress for 18 years.

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

Convicted former Congressman William Jefferson, a New Orleans Democrat, is facing 13 years in prison for taking hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes. But what is more outrageous to some people is the fact that Jefferson will still get his congressional pension paid with your tax dollars.

What do you think about that? Sound off below.

The pension goes to Jefferson, even though Congress passed a law two years ago that was supposed to prohibit congressional convicts from cashing in. That's because his crimes were committed before the law was passed in 2007.

Jefferson isn't the only former lawmaker turned convict who gets to keep his pension. See who else is getting rich in prison tonight on 360°.

Plus, Sarah Palin's interview with Oprah Winfrey aired today. They covered politics, Levi Johnston and more. We've got the raw politics.

And, the American Cancer Society is speaking out against the new advice from a government panel that recommends women shouldn't get mammograms until the age of 50, instead of 40. We'll dig deeper on the controversy. And, Dr. Sanjay Gupta will answer your questions. Text them to AC360 or 22360. Standard message rates apply.

Join us for these stories and much more starting at 10 p.m. ET. See you then!


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
November 16th, 2009
05:24 PM ET

Not covered

Jeffrey Toobin | Bio
CNN Senior Legal Analyst
New Yorker Columnist

Abortion is almost as old as childbirth. There has always been a need for some women to end their pregnancies. In modern times, the law’s attitude toward that need has varied. In the United States, at the time the Constitution was adopted, abortions before “quickening” were both legal and commonplace, often performed by midwives. In the nineteenth century, under the influence of the ascendant medical profession, which opposed abortion (and wanted to control health care), states began to outlaw the procedure, and by the turn of the twentieth century it was all but uniformly illegal. The rise of the feminist movement led to widespread efforts to decriminalize abortion, and in 1973 the Supreme Court found, in Roe v. Wade, that the Constitution prohibited the states from outlawing it.

Throughout this long legal history, the one constant has been that women have continued to have abortions. The rate has declined slightly in recent years, but, according to the Guttmacher Institute, thirty-five per cent of all women of reproductive age in America today will have had an abortion by the time they are forty-five. It might be assumed that such a common procedure would be included in a nation’s plan to protect the health of its citizens. In fact, the story of abortion during the past decade has been its separation from other medical services available to women. Abortion, as the academics like to say, is being marginalized.

The latest evidence comes from the House of Representatives, which two weekends ago narrowly passed its health-care bill, by a vote of 220 to 215. One reason that the Democrats won back control of Congress is that the Party adopted a “big tent” philosophy on abortion. The implications of that approach became clear when, during the health-care vote, the House considered a last-minute amendment by Bart Stupak, a Michigan Democrat, which proposed scrubbing the bill of government subsidies for abortion procedures. It passed 240 to 194, with sixty-four Democrats voting in favor.

Read More...


Filed under: Health Care • Jeffrey Toobin
November 16th, 2009
05:18 PM ET

Beat 360° 11/16/09

Ready for today's Beat 360°? Everyday we post a picture – and you provide the caption and our staff will join in too. Tune in tonight at 10pm to see if you are our favorite! Here is the 'Beat 360°' pic:

(Getty Images) Hulk Hogan arrives at Sydney Airport, ahead of the Australian Hulkamania tour.

Have fun with it. We're looking forward to your captions! Make sure to include your name, city, state (or country) so we can post your comment.

UPDATE BEAT 360º WINNERS

Staff:

Eli Lazar

“How about we send these guns to our troop in Afghanistan, Mr President.”

Viewer:

Kevin Haggith Toronto Canada

"Until you scrolled up and saw my head, I bet you thought it was that Anderson Cooper guy, right?"

_________________________________________________________________________________ Beat 360° Challenge


Filed under: Beat 360° • T1
November 16th, 2009
05:05 PM ET

Terror in Mumbai

HBO Documentary Films

On the evening of November 26, 2008, 10 young Pakistani men reached Mumbai, India in a small hijacked fishing boat, having slaughtered its captain and crew, and arrived unnoticed into busy port city. Over the next three days, armed with cell phones, machine guns and fruits and nuts for sustenance, the men unleashed coordinated attacks across Mumbai that left at least 170 people dead and more than 300 people wounded. Fareed Zakaria, host of CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS and Newsweek's International editor, narrates the powerful documentary, ‘Terror in Mumbai,’ and recounts the events of those three days that sent shockwaves of fear around the world. We’ll show parts of this documentary tonight and we’ll talk to Fareed about the impact of the attacks almost one year later. Learn more about the film here

Read More...


Filed under: Fareed Zakaria
November 16th, 2009
04:39 PM ET

The lessons of Mumbai

The coordinated attacks on hotels, hospitals and railway stations in Mumbai killed more than 170 people.

The coordinated attacks on hotels, hospitals and railway stations in Mumbai killed more than 170 people.

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

It’s been nearly one year since the terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India. At least 170 people died in the attack and 300 people were wounded. It was one of the worst acts of violence on Indian soil in decades. Experts at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace provided insight on the possible motivation of the terrorist, what the attacks revealed about India’s security and the implications for relations between India, Pakistan and the U.S.

Read More...


Filed under: Terrorism
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