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September 17th, 2009
08:42 AM ET
soundoff (63 Responses)
  1. Nicky

    Is there a rational Republican or Conservative talk show host or strategist in the US? They all freak out the minute anyone points out a racist sign or comment. In all the CNN Wed Sept 16th interviews everyone of them said "no racism in the US". Do they know how stupid they sound? Larry King asked a black Conservative Republican if he saw the racist signs and heard the bombastic yelling that the rest of the world did at the "tea party" in DC on the weekend and his answer was NO and how come nobody said anything when Bush was being called a Nazi? Like one has anything to do with another and two wrongs make a right. I can't believe I am saying this but Al Sharpton said it best "it is just as irrational and insane to say everybody who opposes healthcare reforms is racist as it is to say "there is nobody who opposes healthcare that is a racist". David Gergen is so right when he says let's not dignify the discussion by mentioning Limbaugh's name – the majority of the world know he is a opportunistic loser who says what he says for ratings and gives all his followers a terrible reputation.,

    September 17, 2009 at 6:00 pm |
  2. ids

    I agree with Jon, why doesn't CNN dig into these protests objectively? That is what CNN should be doing to maintain it's jouranalistic integrity. Not sponsoring shouting matches between the 'pundits' and 'strategists.' What is the value of these people who just spit out the talking points and/or make up their 'facts'
    We didn't see Tea Parties when President Bush was running up the deficit like crazy for 8 years. In fact we didn't hear a peep from these people who are 'mad as hell' now over government spending.
    What is it that makes these people so mad in less than one year of President Obama being in office, and never brought out the same reaction towards President Bush for 8 long years? They don't exactly look like folk who are patient and long suffering.
    I would be interested in an objective, piece of reporting on this subject

    September 17, 2009 at 5:42 pm |
  3. Ann

    As a 60 year old white woman from the heart of Alabama and grew up during the civil rights movement, I hear racists remarks everyday from my famly and friends about the president. I have a few I don't even speak to anymore because of the racists remarks they make.

    I voted for Obama and think he is trying very hard to do a good job but nothing he does will please the repupblicians. It's like John Legend said, just don't waste time trying to defend the racists people because they will never change. I never thought it was right in the 60's what America did to the blacks and sure don't think it is right today.

    My father stood in the doors of the University of Alabama with George Wallace so believe me I know what I'm talking about. Thank God I didn't believe what was preached to me everyday of my childhood.

    September 17, 2009 at 5:25 pm |
  4. Adrian

    Unfortunately racism is everywhere, in multi-ethnic societies as well as in more homogeneous ones (Europe/Africa/Asia). I think it was obvious when he was sworn in that President Obama will face these kind of situations. Not all the people that voted for McCain voted "against" Obama, but I'm sure that there is a portion of his voters that actually voted "against" Obama rather than "for" McCain. I think as race of human beings, we are far from achieving acceptance at a social level. Right now I think that we have it on an individual level, i.e. a person can be open minded. But where a bunch of people make up a community or society, you'll always find a bigot or a chauvinist or a xenophobe or a racist.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Jan_Pawel_and_Quiana_Jenkins_Pietrzak

    September 17, 2009 at 4:46 pm |
  5. Lampe

    As I've stated before, there were alot of protesters around when GWB was POTUS. To say that there wasn't is just not true. Are there Racist in the mix HELL YEAH! But, to call everyone a Racist, is just not right. And, do you all think that just because GWB ran us into the ground with debt, that gives Obama the right to do the same? He should be getting us out of debt, not adding more to it. Double Standards do not apply when adding to this debt, we can't let it, or all of our children and grandchildren, will never know what it is like to not owe someone. Is that what you all really want? One more Question, Every Black person that hated GWB, was that because of what he stood for, or was it because of the color of his skin? Or maybe it was a little of both?

    September 17, 2009 at 4:45 pm |
  6. Isabel Siaba, Brazil

    Not only America is racist, but many places in the world. My country, where there is a huge diversity of races, there is much racism too. America took a big step against racism when elected President Obama, but in the battle against racism there are still many barriers to be broken.

    September 17, 2009 at 4:40 pm |
  7. Isabel Siaba, Brazil

    No need to go far to mention racism. Just remember, in the early this year, the cartoon in the NY Post that showed the rabid chimpanzee with the following comment: 'They'll have to find someone else to write the stimulus bill'

    September 17, 2009 at 4:33 pm |
  8. Michael Stephenson

    You cannot legitimately deny that a portion of this country holds racist views towards African Americans. Those racists will join in and support anyone else who opposes President Obama. Two people can both voice opposition to Obama's policies each with a different underlying reason for such opposition. Anyone who is not racist, but holds legitimate reasons for opposing Obama's policies will be embarrassed to find themselves on the same side of the argument as a racist, but denying that there are those who are on your side for the wrong reasons is disingenous or even cowardly. Republicans should admit the existence of and also denounce those who expouse such blatantly racist views. Doing so will not weaken the legitimacy of their own opposition.

    September 17, 2009 at 4:31 pm |
  9. David Beard

    Anderson needs to address my comments tonite, so the American People can see for themselves where racism lies so, we can move on. Craigslist houston rants and raves, go read people it makes no sense. let find out who sends those hate comments lets investigate their ip address. find out who it is, maybe senators, house reps, the texas republic. lets do some real investigating on a real issue. accountability is the new slogan right. lets hold the people who post those comments accountable, have some sort of round table to discuss their racism. how can we get over it if we never really address it, with real citizens not some rich politician. i want real people on tv discussing issues not some politician. let the people speak for themselves. Please!!

    September 17, 2009 at 4:17 pm |
  10. Barbara

    If the correct ethnic term had been applied to and used in reference to President Obama, the whole racist issue would be a moot point. He is biracial. Half black and half white. Let's stop digressing and get back to the real issues of the economy, health care and unemployment.

    September 17, 2009 at 4:10 pm |
  11. Jon Brunke

    Jon Ohio

    Anderson,

    I've been reviewing these blogs with much interest. It's pretty clear to me there is an abundance of speculation about the movitation of those directly involved with the tea parties. Nobody seems to know, including those commentators appearing on your show.

    So I have an idea. Your a investigative reporter right? Go investigate.

    Clearly this is of interest to many people I for one would really like to have a better idea what people are thinking. The people directly involved, not just the speculators or the paid pundits.

    Sincerely,

    September 17, 2009 at 4:09 pm |
  12. David Beard

    People take a look a craigslist houston, rants and raves column. there is your racism right there!!

    September 17, 2009 at 4:06 pm |
  13. Joe G. (Illinois)

    How come so many bright/outspoken people can’t ever even once come up with a viable solution? Answer is that: These people are not bright, even if they might be outspoken and part of your refined/selective CNN 360 guest roster. “You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.” The Americana approach ain’t working.

    September 17, 2009 at 4:03 pm |
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