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August 28th, 2009
11:45 PM ET

About our show

Anderson Cooper goes beyond the headlines to tell stories from many points of view, so you can make up your own mind about the news. Weeknights, 10 ET

 

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Filed under: 360° Radar • T1
August 28th, 2009
11:02 PM ET

Video: New Orleans' levees improved?

Program Note: Four years after Katrina, what is New Orleans like now? Some residents continue to face challenges as the Big Easy keeps trying to rebuild. Take a look at In Depth: After the Storm. And to learn about ways you can make a difference, visit Impact Your World.

August 28th, 2009
09:45 PM ET

Live Blog from the Anchor Desk 8/28/09

Tonight, new developments in the bizarre and disturbing story unfolding in Antioch, California—a kidnapping cold case solved after nearly two decades.

There’s also breaking news in the Michael Jackson case. The coroner ruled today the singer’s death was a homicide. The report says Jackson died from “acute propofol intoxication.” It also says a combination of additional drugs contributed to his death. Randi Kaye will have all the details from Los Angeles.

We’ll bring you the highlights from Boston, on the eve of Senator Kennedy’s funeral.

Want to know what else we're covering? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)


Filed under: Live Blog • T1
August 28th, 2009
08:22 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Couple Pleaded Not Guilty to 29 Felony Counts

Phillip Garrido, a registered sex offender, was arraigned in California on Friday.

Phillip Garrido, a registered sex offender, was arraigned in California on Friday.

Cate Vojdik
AC360° Writer

Tonight, new developments in the bizarre and disturbing story unfolding in Antioch, California—a kidnapping cold case solved after nearly two decades.

Phillip Garrido, a convicted sex offender, and his wife, Nancy, were charged today with kidnapping 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard in 1991. Authorities say they kept Dugard, now 29, captive in a secret backyard compound for the last 18 years.

The couple pleaded not guilty to nearly 30 felony counts, including kidnapping for sexual purposes and forcible rape. Investigators say Garrido fathered two children with Dugard, the first when she was just 14.

How could all this have unfolded for so long right in the middle of a residential neighborhood?

Today, the local sheriff made a stunning admission–saying his department missed a chance three years ago to crack the case wide open.

We’ll have more details on how exactly they dropped the ball. We’ll also talk to the heroes who acted on a hunch days ago, leading to Garrido’s arrest.

There’s also breaking news in the Michael Jackson case. The coroner ruled today the singer’s death was a homicide. The report says Jackson died from “acute propofol intoxication.” It also says a combination of additional drugs contributed to his death. Randi Kaye will have all the details from Los Angeles.

For a second day, thousands of people filed past Sen. Ted Kennedy’s coffin at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, paying their last respects. The public viewing ended this afternoon. An invitation-only memorial service is underway at this hour, with a veritable Who’s Who of Washington gathered to pay tribute to the lion of the Senate. Sen. Chris Dodd of Connecticut just finished his remarks. A former Kennedy aide is now singing one of Kennedy’s favorite songs, the senator’s flag-draped casket just feet away. We’ll bring you the highlights from Boston, on the eve of Senator Kennedy’s funeral.

We’re also continuing our special coverage from New Orleans, four years after the storm. After the floods, important people promised they would never let the city flood again. They vowed to rebuild the levees bigger and stronger than before. But that hasn’t happened. Why not? We’re keeping them honest.

See you at 10 p.m. EST


Filed under: 360° Radar • Crime & Punishment • The Buzz
August 28th, 2009
05:25 PM ET

Beat 360° 8/28/09

Ready for today's Beat 360°? Everyday we post a picture – and you provide the caption and our staff will join in too. Tune in tonight at 10pm to see if you are our favorite! Here is the 'Beat 360°' pic:

Celebrity impersonators pose as First Lady Michelle Obama, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, and former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, during the Sunburst Convention of Celebrity Tribute Artists in Orlando, Florida.

Have fun with it. We're looking forward to your captions! Make sure to include your name, city, state (or country) so we can post your comment.

_________________________________________________________________________________ Beat 360° Challenge


Filed under: Beat 360° • T1
August 28th, 2009
05:16 PM ET

Schedule of events for Sen. Ted Kennedy's memorial service

AC360°

Funeral services for Sen. Edward M. Kennedy will begin Thursday, August 27, with events scheduled through Saturday, when he'll be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Check out this schedule to say updated on all of the events over the weekend.

Click here for more details on the services.


Filed under: Sen. Ted Kennedy
August 28th, 2009
05:15 PM ET

How much does a “shared planet” cost? Free at Starbucks…

Planet Money
NPR

Check out this receipt from Starbucks photo on NPR's Planet Money Blog. It was submitted by Jen Firlik.

Shared planet = NC. Free, it seems.


Filed under: Beyond 360 • T1
August 28th, 2009
04:38 PM ET

Reckless Neglect: A disaster waiting to happen...again?

Stephen Flynn, Frank J. Cilluffo, and Sharon L. Cardash
AC360° Contributors

Katrina, the costliest hurricane in U.S. history, roared ashore on the Gulf Coast four years ago on August 29, 2005. The images of floating corpses and storm survivors stranded on rooftops and at the Superdome will long be seared in our collective memories. Even today, many families throughout the Gulf region are finding the road to recovery to be a long and arduous one.

For those of us during the late summer of 2005 who were fortunate enough to reside outside of harm’s way, we should pause on the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina to reflect on this sobering fact: 9 out of 10 Americans live in a place that faces a moderate to high risk of a natural disaster. North America is a beautiful continent, but Mother Nature is not always very kind to it. Earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, wildfires, hurricanes, flooding, blizzards, and high-wind damage are always in the offing.

While Katrina serves as a forceful reminder of the inevitability of natural disasters, it underscores another important lesson: the risk we will become victims will rise dramatically if we neglect infrastructure. We now know that New Orleans should have survived the storm largely unscathed. The city’s flood protection system was supposed to withstand a direct hit by a powerful Category 3 hurricane. But New Orleans dodged the worst of the storm because at the last minute, Katrina’s center veered east so that the winds that buffeted New Orleans were barely above Category 1. Tragically, because the levees had been so shabbily maintained, they started to fail even before the full fury of the storm had arrived. In the end, it was not an Act of God that doomed so many New Orleanians. It was the neglect of man.

FULL POST

August 28th, 2009
04:25 PM ET

4 years after Katrina, NOLA mental health system still in crisis

Alesia Crockett, who suffers from bipolar disorder, ended up in a hospital hours outside New Orleans.

Alesia Crockett, who suffers from bipolar disorder, ended up in a hospital hours outside New Orleans.

Stephanie Smith
CNN Medical Producer

As the storm raged outside her hospital room four years ago, an equally consuming force hijacked Alesia Crockett's mind: deep depression.

For days, Crockett lay in darkness and a tangle of sweaty hospital bed sheets, one among hundreds of desperate patients trapped inside Charity Hospital in 2005, while outside, Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath battered the city.

Crockett had been admitted to Charity's inpatient mental health unit after having a psychotic episode. She had struggled for years with bipolar disorder, an illness that causes her to volley between euphoria and profound depression.

She said she barely remembers Katrina.

"Most of the time, I was in a fog, but I do remember some things," Crockett said. "Where my room was, I could see thousands of people wandering, and I could see the waters rise."

Keep reading...


Filed under: Hurricane Katrina
August 28th, 2009
04:20 PM ET

Recidivism rates for sex offenders

Phillip Garrido is a registered sex offender, listed as having been convicted of forcible rape.

Phillip Garrido is a registered sex offender, listed as having been convicted of forcible rape.

AC360°

The 18-year mystery surrounding the kidnapping case of Jaycee Dugard ended this week when a sex offender admitted to correction authorities that he abducted her.

Dugard was 11-years-old when she was snatched from the street in front of her house in 1991. She had two children with the man accused of taking her and since her kidnapping she has lived in her alleged abductor’s backyard, in a shed. All of this played out in a residential neighborhood.

All of this got us thinking – what are the recidivism rates for sex offenders? We found this report released a few years ago by the Department of Justice. It is a study based on convicted sex offenders who were released from prison in 1994.

Here are some of the findings from the study:

– Within 3 years following their 1994 state prison release, 5.3 percent of sex offenders (men who had committed rape or sexual assault) were rearrested for another sex crime, the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. If all crimes are included, 43 percent of sex offenders were rearrested for various offenses.

– Sex offenders were less likely than non-sex offenders to be rearrested for any offense –– 43 percent of sex offenders versus 68 percent of non-sex offenders. But sex offenders were about four times more likely than non-sex offenders to be arrested for another sex crime after their discharge from prison –– 5.3 percent of sex offenders versus 1.3 percent of non-sex offenders.

Click here for the full report.°


Filed under: Jaycee Dugard
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