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July 2nd, 2009
09:45 PM ET

Live Blog from the Anchor Desk 07/02/09

We have information that might shed new light on perhaps the central unanswered question in Michael Jackson's death. Was the "King of Pop" using powerful, potentially deadly, surgical anesthetics to get to sleep? Don't miss our exclusive 360° investigation.

Want to know what else we're covering tonight? Read EVENING BUZZ

Scroll down to join the live chat during the program. It's your chance to share your thoughts on tonight's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules.

Here are some of them:

1) Keep it short (we don't have time to read a "book")
2) Don't write in ALL CAPS (there's no need to yell)
3) Use your real name (first name only is fine)
4) No links
5) Watch your language (keep it G-rated; PG at worst - and that includes $#&*)

And take a look at our live web camera from the 360° studio. Watch the WEBCAM


Filed under: Live Blog • T1
July 2nd, 2009
09:45 PM ET

Lose yourself in Buenos Aires

Gov. Mark Sanford has said it's better for him to keep his governorship to learn lessons.

Gov. Mark Sanford has said it's better for him to keep his governorship to learn lessons.

David Puente
AC360° Producer

There’s another twist in the story of South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford today. His wife, South Carolina First Lady Jenny Sanford said she is “willing to forgive Mark for his actions,” though she did put the onus on him publicly. “Mark has stated that his intent and determination is to save our marriage…I hope he can make good on those intentions,” she said in a statement.

I was covering the disappearance of the governor last week, before being pulled into the breaking news of Michael Jackson’s death. Though it feels like it’s been longer than that, it was just last Monday when Sanford’s spokesman Joel Sawyer said his boss was on the road, “to kind of clear his head after the legislative session." Then Wednesday morning was when I read the governor’s first account of his trip to Buenos Aires in The State, South Carolina’s largest newspaper. “I would get out of the bubble I'm in," Sanford said describing why he traveled to Argentina. But something about even the article’s headline just didn’t ring true: “Governor Says He Cruised Along the Coast of Buenos Aires.”

During one of my visits to Buenos Aires, I wanted to go to the beach but it never happened because the nearest “decent” one, I was told, was about 250 miles away. So it seemed unbelievable to me that the governor would want to travel for so many hours just to go cruising along a “decent” coastline. Of course if he had really wanted to go to a beach, he could have stayed in South Carolina as its official tourism website says, the state’s coast has “miles of crystal white sand” and it’s a great place to “relax at a romantic island resort”.

FULL POST


Filed under: 360° Radar • David Puente
July 2nd, 2009
08:14 PM ET

Evening Buzz: Jackson Rehearsal Caught on Tape

Michael Jackson is shown rehearsing at the Staples Center on June 23, two days before his death.

Michael Jackson is shown rehearsing at the Staples Center on June 23, two days before his death.

Maureen Miller
AC360° Writer

Tonight on 360°, we'll play for you the last known video of Michael Jackson shot two days before he died.  CNN got the video from Jackson's concert promoter, AEG Live. It  was recorded at his last full rehearsal at LA's Staples Center. Jackson appears healthy as he danced and sang "They Don't Care About Us", a song from his HIStory album.

Anderson is reporting live from Los Angeles again tonight. He'll share with you his interview today with Randy Phillips, president and CEO of AEG. Phillips saw Jackson in his last rehearsal Wednesday night. He told Anderson that Jackson was a "healthy, vibrant human being" hours before his death. "He put his arm around me, and with that soft voice of his he whispered in my ear, 'Thank you, we're going to get it there together. I know I can do this.'"

Anderson also spoke with Jackson's show director, musical director and choreographer. All three have amazing insight on Jackson's final hours. The "King of Pop" was scheduled to return to the arena for another rehearsal at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, two hours after he was pronounced dead at UCLA Medical Center.

Tonight, we also have new insight on the memorial service that will take place Tuesday morning at the Staples Center. The arena has 20,000 seats.  We're also working our sources to find out when his funeral will take place.

There are also legal developments tied to Jackson's death. We've learned that a judge has delayed for a week, until July 13, a hearing to decide if Jackson's mother will remain the temporary guardian of Jackson's children.  Will the mother of Jackson's two oldest children, Debbie Rowe, try to get custody of them? Do you think she should? Share your thoughts below. Randi Kaye will have that story for you tonight.

In other news, a U.S. soldier has been abducted in southeastern Afghanistan. He's being held by a notorious militant clan, a senior U.S. military official said. Here's what's been pieced together: The American soldier and three Afghan soldiers were first captured by low-level militants who then quickly "sold" them to the clan. Nic Robertson will have the latest on military mystery tonight on 360°.

And, on a lighter note, don't miss tonight's shot. Wait 'till you see what a sea lion was caught doing in Southern California. We could put this in our infamous category of "Amazing Animal Video."

Join us for all this and much more starting at 10pm ET. See you then!


Filed under: Maureen Miller • The Buzz
July 2nd, 2009
06:23 PM ET

Beat 360º 7/2/09

Ready for today's Beat 360°? Everyday we post a picture – and you provide the caption and our staff will join in too. Tune in tonight at 10pm to see if you are our favorite! Here is the 'Beat 360°' pic:

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger holds a press conference in Los Angeles. The governor attacked the Democratic-led state legislature, saying it is putting union interests over taxpayers' well-being. The governor made the remarks as the state was about to start issuing IOUs instead of payments. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Have fun with it. We're looking forward to your captions! Make sure to include your name, city, state (or country) so we can post your comment.

UPDATE: Check out our Beat 360° Winners!


Filed under: Beat 360° • T1
July 2nd, 2009
05:22 PM ET
July 2nd, 2009
05:21 PM ET

Rowe: “My kids don’t call me Mom, because I don’t want them to”

Program Note: For more about Debbie Rowe and her role in the Jackson custody battle, tune in for Randi Kaye's report tonight on AC360º at 10 P.M. ET.

Debbie Rowe, ex-wife of the recently deceased Michael Jackson and biological mother of Paris and Michael Jr., is the latest to enter the Jackson custody battle. In a 2005 'Fox TV' interview, Rowe commented on her role as a mother and her relationship with Michael Jackson.

DEBBIE ROWE, JACKSON`S EX-WIFE: My kids don`t call me Mom, because I don`t want them to. They`re not - they`re Michael`s children. It`s not that they`re not my children, but I had them because I wanted him to be a father.

I believe that there are people who should be parents. And he`s one of them.

We are a family unit. Michael and I will always be connected with the kids. I will always be there for him. I will always be there for the children. And people make remarks, "Oh, I can`t believe she left her children."

Left them? I left my children? I did not leave my children. My children are with their father where they`re supposed to be.


Filed under: 360° Radar • Michael Jackson
July 2nd, 2009
04:42 PM ET

U.S. “hits the pause button” on aid to Honduras

Zelaya's supporters burn tires Monday near the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa.

Zelaya's supporters burn tires Monday near the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa.

Charley Keyes
CNN Senior Producer

The United States put some teeth in its diplomatic signals to Honduras Thursday, stopping some aid programs temporarily to the Latin American country as it grapples with its two-president crisis.

State Department spokesman Ian Kelly said the U.S. already had “hit the pause button” on some aid programs, even before lawyers make a final ruling on whether to halt assistance.

The United States continues to hope the Organization of American States quickly will hammer out a compromise between ousted President Manuel Zelaya, forced out of Honduras last weekend, and the man who took his job, Provisional President Roberto Micheletti.

Mr. Zelaya earlier had said he would defy the new government and return to the Honduras capital of Tegucigalpa Thursday. He later postponed that to Saturday to allow the OAS negotiations to proceed.

FULL POST


Filed under: 360º Follow
July 2nd, 2009
04:38 PM ET
July 2nd, 2009
04:32 PM ET

Documents: Air France investigation report

The tail fin of the Airbus A330 that crashed in the Atlantic is unloaded in Brazil earlier this month.

The tail fin of the Airbus A330 that crashed in the Atlantic is unloaded in Brazil earlier this month.

Today, French investigators announced the Air France flight that crashed off the coast of Brazil last month did not break up in the air, but hit the water intact.

The details of the investigation are located in the French Office of Investigations and Analyses' Report, which you can read here.


Filed under: 360º Follow • Documents
July 2nd, 2009
04:20 PM ET

The survival of Bahia

Kassim Bakari said he thought he would never see his wife or daughter again after learning of the crash.

Kassim Bakari said he thought he would never see his wife or daughter again after learning of the crash.

Michael Schulder
CNN Senior Executive Producer

It wasn’t the Hudson River. It wasn’t a soft landing. It wasn’t a happy ending. When the Yemenia Airlines Airbus went down in the rough seas of the Indian Ocean, 152 people perished. Everyone on board. Everyone except a 14-year-old girl named Bahia Bakari. The way her father describes her, Bahia did not fit the profile of a survivor. She could “barely swim” her father told the Associated Press. She was, he said, a fragile, timid girl.

Bahia was on the plane with her mother, flying from their home in Paris, to Yemen, then on to the Comoros Islands off the southeast coast of Africa to visit Bahia’s grandma. Their flight was approaching the Comoros when it disappeared from the radar. With the wind blowing at nearly 40 miles an hour, the plane went down in the choppy seas of the Indian Ocean. Bahia’s father, back in Paris, recounted for the AP what his daughter told him over the phone. “Papa, we saw the plane going down in the water. I was in the water. I could hear people talking, but I couldn’t see anyone. I was in the dark. I couldn’t see a thing. On top of that, daddy, I can’t swim well and I held onto something, but I don’t really know what.”

FULL POST

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