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February 9th, 2009
04:56 PM ET

Obama sells stimulus plan

President Obama traveled to Elkhard, Indiana to promote the stimulus package being considered by Congress.

February 9th, 2009
04:33 PM ET

Sully could have delivered those octuplets in his sleep

Nadya Suleman, mother of the octuplets, and Angelina Jolie.

Nadya Suleman, mother of the octuplets, and Angelina Jolie.

Jack Gray
AC360° Associate Producer

I can hear the Octuplet Mom screaming at her television set now. Damn you, Sully Sullenberger, how dare you and your neatly trimmed mustache encroach on my morning show turf. Indeed, the broadcast networks presented us with an exciting dichotomy today.

On ABC and CBS, the hero US Airways pilot who saved 155 lives without breaking a sweat.  On NBC, the woman who says that she will, in fact, be able to care for her 14 children…as soon as she goes back to school and they get full-time jobs.

As for Captain Chesley B. Sullenberger III, he’s back in New York for the aforementioned round of television interviews, including one tomorrow night with Larry King.  I can picture it now.  “Good to meet you Captain Sullenberger.”

“Please, Larry, (gives him the two-handed handshake, looks him in the eye and pauses a beat) call me Sully.” By then I’m hoping Sully will be channeling 50 Cent and wearing his Key to the City on a gold chain around his neck.

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Filed under: 360° Radar • Chesley Sullenberger • Jack Gray • Octuplets
February 9th, 2009
04:08 PM ET

Actress Murdered

A picture of Coco Silvera on the main page of her website.

A picture of Coco Silvera on the main page of her website.

Gabriel Falcon
AC360° Writer

Manhattan’s Upper West Side used to be a dangerous place to live. Crime was high. Drugs were rampant. But that was decades ago. Today, the neighborhood is one of the safest parts of New York. It’s also among the priciest. Celebrities and wealthy families call it home. Upscale shops and trendy restaurants line the streets. Moms and nannies with kids on their way to private school clog the sidewalks. You’ve got a much better chance of being run over by a $1000 stokke stroller than being mugged.

Debra Silver lived on the Upper West Side. In a doorman building. Her apartment was just a block from Central Park. It’s still there. She is not. The 46-year-old was murdered in her home last week. So was a former companion. Police say both were shot to death by Silver’s current boyfriend. The New York Daily News reports she was making dinner for the two of them when the killer entered and gunned both down. He then committed suicide.

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Filed under: Crime & Punishment • Gabe Falcon
February 9th, 2009
03:51 PM ET

Let shame be A-Rod's punishment

Jeffrey Toobin
CNN Contributor

Congressional hearings rarely produce much news of interest, or much good for the world, but the House Government Reform Committee did a great service to baseball - and the country - on March 17, 2005.

That was the day that several great stars of the recent era, including Mark McGuire, Sammy Sosa and Rafael Palmeiro, were forced to answer questions about steroids.

McGuire hedged (he said he didn't want to talk about the past); Palmeiro may have lied (he later tested positive); and the usually talkative Sosa developed a sudden unfamiliarity with the English language (he testified in Spanish).

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Filed under: 360° Radar • Jeffrey Toobin • Steriods
February 9th, 2009
02:41 PM ET

Bank plan postponed until Tuesday

CNNMoney.com

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner was originally scheduled to give full details about the changes to the rescue plan in a speech midday Monday. But the Treasury Department said Sunday that the plan will be announced Tuesday instead, in order for Geithner to focus on the stimulus bill that is being debated in the Senate.

"With record high job losses, and weakening economic forecasts, we're focused on working with Congress to pass an economic recovery bill so we can create the jobs and make the investments necessary to get our economy moving again," said Treasury spokesperson Isaac Baker in a statement. "Economic officials administration wide will be working and consulting with senators throughout the day."

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Filed under: Bailout Turmoil • Economy • Raw Politics
February 9th, 2009
02:25 PM ET

Month robs blacks of part in U.S. history

Cynthia Tucker
Ajc.com

When Carter G. Woodson launched Negro History Week in 1926, white mobs still lynched black citizens with impunity, black students attended inferior segregated schools and black patrons were not allowed to stay at major hotels in Montgomery or Memphis. There were no black players in the major leagues, no black Cabinet secretaries and no black generals or admirals in the armed forces.

Woodson, who was born to former slaves but went on to earn a Harvard doctorate, believed that America ought to recognize the significant contributions that its black citizens had made to the nation’s cultural and civic life — contributions that were ignored in (or, in some cases, expunged from) the historical record. So he chose the week in which both Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were born to commemorate the substantial achievements of black Americans against heartbreaking odds.

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Filed under: Black in America • Race in America
February 9th, 2009
02:00 PM ET

Obama's team of zombies

David Sirota
Salon.com

Only weeks ago, the political world was buzzing about a "team of rivals." America was told that finally, after years of yes men running the government, we were getting a president who would follow Abraham Lincoln’s lead, fill his administration with varying viewpoints, and glean empirically sound policy from the clash of ideas. Little did we know that "team of rivals" was what George Orwell calls "newspeak": an empty slogan "claiming that black is white, in contradiction of the plain facts."

Obama's national security team, for instance, includes not a single Iraq war opponent. The president has not only retained George W. Bush's defense secretary, Robert Gates, but also 150 other Bush Pentagon appointees. The only "rivalry" is between those who back increasing the already bloated defense budget by an absurd amount and those who aim to boost it by a ludicrous amount.

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February 9th, 2009
01:33 PM ET

We won in Afghanistan, so what's the problem?

Program Note: Tune in to hear more from Peter Bergen tonight on AC360° at 10 p.m. ET.

President Obama says he is sending an additional 30,000 troops to Afghanistan.

President Obama says he is sending an additional 30,000 troops to Afghanistan.

Peter Bergen | Bio
AC360° Contributor
CNN National Security Analyst

When President Bush left office the Taliban were stronger than at any point since they had lost Kabul seven years earlier. The Taliban, which in 2002 had barely been more than a nuisance, now controlled large sections of Afghanistan’s most important road, the Kabul to Kandahar highway. And the southern part of the country was not only the source of the vast majority of the world’s heroin, but it was also quite dangerous for those the Taliban deemed an enemy, which, in practice, meant pretty much anyone who wasn’t part of their movement.

By mid-2008 more Americans soldiers were dying in Afghanistan every month than in Iraq. And, by one estimate, by the end of 2008 Taliban had a permanent presence in 72 percent of Afghanistan, up from 54 percent the year before. Indicative of their increased ability to operate more or less freely anywhere in the country, on August 18, 2008 some 100 Taliban fighters ambushed a French-Afghan patrol about 25 miles east of Kabul and in a 12-hour battle killed ten French soldiers. Similarly, in Wanat in the eastern province of Nuristan a few weeks earlier, on July 13, 2008, approximately 200 Taliban guerrillas attacked a NATO base killing nine American soldiers and wounding 27 more.

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February 9th, 2009
12:26 PM ET

Financial Dispatch: Stimulus road show

Nissan is planning to slash its global production by 20 percent.

Nissan is planning to slash its global production by 20 percent.

Andrew Torgan
CNN Financial News Producer

President Obama visits Elkhart, Indiana today for a town hall-style event designed to help push his stimulus package through Congress. The unemployment rate in Elkhart has jumped to 15.3% from 4.7% in just the past year due to a loss of manufacturing jobs. And on Tuesday he travels to Fort Myers, Florida, where the unemployment rate is 10%. He’ll also hold his first primetime news conference tonight at 8:00 p.m.

A compromise version of the economic recovery plan is likely to pass the Senate with a handful of Republican votes as early as Tuesday, but a final bill is still a ways off. If the Senate passes the bill, leaders will need to then negotiate the final bill with the House, which passed a different version nearly two weeks ago.

CNNMoney.com has several stories about the debate, including how the two versions differ and what provisions got cut in the Senate.

FULL POST


Filed under: Andrew Torgan • Economy • Finance • Gas Prices • Oil • President Barack Obama
February 9th, 2009
12:01 PM ET

Was Lincoln a racist?

Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Theroot.com

I first encountered Abraham Lincoln in Piedmont, W.Va. When I was growing up, his picture was in nearly every black home I can recall, the only white man, other than Jesus himself, to grace black family walls. Lincoln was a hero to us.

One rainy Sunday afternoon in 1960, when I was 10 years old, I picked up a copy of our latest Reader’s Digest Condensed Books, and, thumbing through, stumbled upon Jim Bishop’s The Day Lincoln Was Shot, which had been published in 1955 and immediately became a runaway bestseller. It is an hour-by-hour chronicle of the last day of Lincoln’s life. I couldn’t help crying by the end.

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Filed under: Black in America
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